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ROG G751JY repaste

Cannon_19
Level 9
I noticed my laptop was getting quite hot recently, and checked the temperature with some stress test.
CPU goes as high as 96 degrees celsius, while GPU hits 87/88 degrees and throttles.
So I pretty much have to open it up and clean/repaste everything at this point, been 1.5 years since the last time anyway.
But I've never done it myself before, so I need some guidance.
Which termal paste would work the best for this model? I've seen a number of people complainig about kryonaut and mx-4 drying up quickly.
Also, apparently I need to get thermal pads as well for some stuff. How thick should they be and which ones should I get? Frankly I'm not even sure where I need to use them.
I found this picture for another laptop that uses the same gpu (gtx 980m):


But it looks a bit different on this model:



I really need help with this.
Thanks in advance!
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7 REPLIES 7

andreacos92
Level 9
With my G751JY, in these years, I used MX-4, IC Diamond and now I have Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut (repasted a month ago).
I had no problems with all of them and they are quite good in thermal performance.

Regards the GPU VRAM and VRMs, Asus used thermal paste and I suggest you to do the same.
I tried using 1.0 mm thermal pads, but I had the impression that the gap was so small that the pads thickness prevent the right contact between GPU die chip and the copper heatsink.
Maybe you can try with 0.5 mm thermal pads, I think they should work quite well.

andreacos92 wrote:
With my G751JY, in these years, I used MX-4, IC Diamond and now I have Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut (repasted a month ago).
I had no problems with all of them and they are quite good in thermal performance.

Regards the GPU VRAM and VRMs, Asus used thermal paste and I suggest you to do the same.
I tried using 1.0 mm thermal pads, but I had the impression that the gap was so small that the pads thickness prevent the right contact between GPU die chip and the copper heatsink.
Maybe you can try with 0.5 mm thermal pads, I think they should work quite well.


Thank you. Have you had any problems when using thermal paste for VRAM and VRMs ?
And what brand of thermal pads should I look for if I decide to go with them?

Cannon.19 wrote:
Thank you. Have you had any problems when using thermal paste for VRAM and VRMs ?
And what brand of thermal pads should I look for if I decide to go with them?


Until you use not conductive paste, you don't have any problems with thermal paste on VRAM and VRMs. And most of the well-known thermal paste are not conductive, so go with the one you can afford better in your country. Arctic MX-4, IC Diamond, Kryonaut are among the best, but the difference between a top-end compound and a medium compound is smaller than you can think. Go with a well known brand and make sure to apply it correctly, that makes the bigger difference.


mdzcpa wrote:
Just an observation. There is WAY to much paste applied in your photo. I am not sure who did that you in the past, but that is a MESS. Paste should be applied only to the center chip or integrated heat spreader. It should be a nice thin layer. It does not need to be applied in globs and blobs all around the area surrounding the CPU or GPU. In fact, doing so can make the chip run hotter.


+1

I didn't say that because I thought that was a photo taken from the web, but yes that was too much paste.

Anyway, with some thermal pastes you can spread on the chip, Thermal Grizzly suggests this method for example, because it is quite soft. But you have to be sure to create a thin and uniform layer at the same time, and it's not the easiest thing in the world.
On the other hand, you can go with the little pie at center of Die chip method, and then be sure to apply a good pressure with the heatspreader to make the paste spread well.

andreacos92 wrote:
Until you use not conductive paste, you don't have any problems with thermal paste on VRAM and VRMs. And most of the well-known thermal paste are not conductive, so go with the one you can afford better in your country. Arctic MX-4, IC Diamond, Kryonaut are among the best, but the difference between a top-end compound and a medium compound is smaller than you can think. Go with a well known brand and make sure to apply it correctly, that makes the bigger difference.




+1

I didn't say that because I thought that was a photo taken from the web, but yes that was too much paste.

Anyway, with some thermal pastes you can spread on the chip, Thermal Grizzly suggests this method for example, because it is quite soft. But you have to be sure to create a thin and uniform layer at the same time, and it's not the easiest thing in the world.
On the other hand, you can go with the little pie at center of Die chip method, and then be sure to apply a good pressure with the heatspreader to make the paste spread well.


It is indeed from the web 😄 , I haven't opened mine yet, want to make sure I'm ready before I do.
It's a screenshot from a youtube video where a guy just changed cpu and gpu paste, he didn't even touch the VRMs and VRAM, which I found really odd.
Thank you for helping again, I think I'll order the 0.5mm and 1mm pads too, just in case the paste doesn't fill the gap nicely.

mdzcpa
Level 12
Just an observation. There is WAY to much paste applied in your photo. I am not sure who did that you in the past, but that is a MESS. Paste should be applied only to the center chip or integrated heat spreader. It should be a nice thin layer. It does not need to be applied in globs and blobs all around the area surrounding the CPU or GPU. In fact, doing so can make the chip run hotter.

mdzcpa wrote:
Just an observation. There is WAY to much paste applied in your photo. I am not sure who did that you in the past, but that is a MESS. Paste should be applied only to the center chip or integrated heat spreader. It should be a nice thin layer. It does not need to be applied in globs and blobs all around the area surrounding the CPU or GPU. In fact, doing so can make the chip run hotter.


Yeah, I agree, gonna take a while to clean this up 😄

EdFernandez2
Level 7

Arctic MX-4 shouldn't dry up as fast as you'd think, as long as there's full contact to the heatsink and avoiding any air exposure.  The correct thickness of the thermal pads is 1mm for the vram and mosfets then 1.5mm for the vrm.  I've had to find out through trial and error beginning with putting Arctic MX-4 on all chips needing TIM, then went from there to the pads and finding the correct thickness without losing full contact on the GPU and CPU.