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Maximum Hero X core voltages are insane?!!?

el_terrible
Level 8
Hey,

So I finally got a hold of an 8700K and really wanted to wait for the Formula to release, but I can't even find a date for the relase of it in Norway so I decided to go for a Hero X, I had the Hero VII in my previous build and was happy with it so why not..

But straight out of the box I started getting really really high temps while just playing games (80-90 celcius) and even high 60's-70's just in windows watchin youtube and at first I thought it was my new Noctua cooler that was faulty so I even RMA'd it and got a Corsair H100i v2, not even thinking about core voltages (I know it was dumb).. but then I got the same friggin bad temps with the H100i..... then I almost RMA'd my 8700K, but THEN I found out my Hero was pumping 1.412 V into my CPU by DEFAULT....... this is with the 0505 Bios (newest)... like what the hell Asus. I could probably run like way over 5GHz with that kind of voltage, something I'm not even interested in doing with my current setup.
Prime95 goes to 100 degrees in less than 10 minutes.. Assassins Creed Origins crashes after 10-30 minutes.. And my ambient temp is only 22 degrees at the moment (Winter in Norway).. Setting my voltage to 1.200 seems to have fixed everything, but still I am spending hours on this.. I usually don't really bother changing too much in the BIOS, because I trust the ROG team with this stuff and I don't want to break anything myself.. Why would they even do this?!?!? I usually love your stuff and have used Maximus motherboards for my last 4 builds now...

Sorry about the rant, but yeah......
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61 REPLIES 61

morph_
Level 11
Thanks Praz, so after that how do I get it to boot up with the configured settings?

Even after saving the settings and moving on it won’t post...

Seems to be playing post roulette... but once it posts the system boots fine goes into windows and runs... oddly I’ve seen it post once or twice with the “safe mode” voltage settings too...*

Raja
Level 13
Increase the VID to get the target load voltage your CPU needs. Even though, you thought you were seeing no droop and overshoot on the previous build, it was there - you just need a scope to see it.

Raja@ASUS wrote:
Increase the VID to get the target load voltage your CPU needs. Even though, you thought you were seeing no droop and overshoot on the previous build, it was there - you just need a scope to see it.


Hi Raja,


Thank you for the quick response. By stating I should "increase the VID to get the target load" , are you stating I should just increase the CPU voltage from 1.28v to 1.285v, while keeping my previous LLC of 6 and accept the displayed software reading voltage in windows reads overvolting (1.296v) at certain times of load/idle ? Or is there another setting I'm missing that needs to be adjusted?

Overall, it does not surprise me the droop was there. I just preferred knowing my chip was stable at 1.28v w/ no vdroop at LLC6.

Raja
Level 13
A few things:

1) Yes, adjust VID to get voltage your CPU needs under load. There is no issue with that.

2) There is no such thing as no droop. It's actually better if the droop is set to compliment the VRM. If the LLC is too aggressive, it results in more overshoot (which is far worse than Vdroop).

Raja@ASUS wrote:
A few things:

1) Yes adjust VID to get voltage your CPU needs under load. There is no issue with that.

2) There is no such thing as no droop. It's actually better if the droop is set to compliment the VRM.


Great, thank you. Here's my settings so far! Does anything look off to you?



CPU: 8700k - Memory: F4-3600C16D-16GTZR

Custom Watercooling loop (480 Rad + 360 Rad) w/ EK Monoblock + single GTX 1070

XMP Profile Selected

MCE Disabled

AVX 0

Sync all cores 50

CPU SVID Support Disabled

LLC Level 6

Internal CPU power management - Long & Short Duration Power Package - 4095

CPU Core/Cache Current Limit Max 255.50

Min & max cpu cache ratio 47

BCLK Aware Adaptive Voltage - Dissabled

CPU Core/Cache Voltage - 1.285

DRAM 1.35V - VCCIO 0.95v - VCCSA 1.05v


With the bumped VID the system runs very well! I just have to accept my chip takes 1.296v to be stable.....

Raja
Level 13
The actual load voltage required to keep your CPU stable will be the same between both builds. The set VID is not the load voltage.

Raja@ASUS wrote:
The actual load voltage required to keep your CPU stable will be the same between both builds. The set VID is not the load voltage.


Okay. I think I understand what you are saying. However, I need to read some more in depth material on CPU VID and its correlation to CPU Core Voltage. My understanding is, the CPU VID is a base voltage number set by Intel which changes based on the "need" of the CPU during different states of Load. For example, the VID can be anywhere from 1.25v to 1.35v depending on what the CPU is asking for in it's current load/state. The VID value has nothing to do with the actual load voltage or CPU Core voltage that the processor is receiving. Example, Bios settings 1.285v LLC 6 = software reading @ 100% load of 1.28v with a VID of 1.35v

In your previous comments, you say to adjust the VID to achieve the desired load voltage, to achieve stability. If my understanding is true from above, how can I affect the VID value? Wouldn't I just increase CPU core voltage to in turn adjust the minimum load voltage required for stability. And than accept the variances of overshoot/undershoot (vdroop) software readings being displayed. How would you actually adjust VID?

Sorry if I'm missing something blatantly obvious. And thank you very much for your help!

Raja
Level 13
Vid is what you set in bios. In adaptive mode, the vid you set in bios is the vid that's applied when the cpu goes into full load state (the requested vid is affected by the ia ac and dc load lines). In manual mode, the vid you apply in bios is the always applied, regardless of the load. The llc affects the gap between vid and the actual voltage, but the trade off is overshoot. The overshoot cannot be seen without an oscilloscope.


With the llc slope changing between builds, you may need a higher Vid, but ultimately the voltage the cpu needs to be stable is still the same. You just increase the vid to get that voltage.

Raja@ASUS wrote:
Vid is what you set in bios. In adaptive mode, the vid you set in bios is the vid that's applied when the cpu goes into full load state (the requested vid is affected by the ia ac and dc load lines). In manual mode, the vid you apply in bios is the always applied, regardless of the load. The llc affects the gap between vid and the actual voltage, but the trade off is overshoot. The overshoot cannot be seen without an oscilloscope.


With the llc slope changing between builds, you may need a higher Vid, but ultimately the voltage the cpu needs to be stable is still the same. You just increase the vid to get that voltage.



Thank you for the quick explanation!

Raja@ASUS wrote:
Vid is what you set in bios. In adaptive mode, the vid you set in bios is the vid that's applied when the cpu goes into full load state (the requested vid is affected by the ia ac and dc load lines). In manual mode, the vid you apply in bios is the always applied, regardless of the load. The llc affects the gap between vid and the actual voltage, but the trade off is overshoot. The overshoot cannot be seen without an oscilloscope.


With the llc slope changing between builds, you may need a higher Vid, but ultimately the voltage the cpu needs to be stable is still the same. You just increase the vid to get that voltage.


can i ask what LLC you would recommend then?