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Integrated graphics resolution messed up while in games

migles
Level 7
hello i have an ix hero + i7-7700k
i am using integrated graphics (intel hd630) until i get enough for a good GPU however this one is doing the job...

I have a weird issue, i have lastest drivers i can find tried both from asus website and intel, lastest bios (the previous bios also did this problem), windows 10 64 bits
my monitor is 1440x900, in windows it detects fine the resolution and works as expected

however in games, selecting this resolution outputs a picture bigger than my screen, my monitor even complains and asks to select 1440x900
even selecting the 13xx-xxx resoltion a portion appears off screen..
however if i select 1280x800, the monitor thinks it's outputting at 1440x900 and displays it properly..
this happens on every game.. however some games even with the 1280x800 resolution i come up with issues

same thing happens in both my monitor and a tv i tested with the same resolution...
using hdmi, since display port adapters are expensive as hell
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2 REPLIES 2

Korth
Level 14
1440x900 (WXGA+, aka WSXGA, WXGA-II) is a nonstandard resolution with a nonstandard 5:3 widescreen aspect ratio. Wikipedia.

Because 1440x900 is "nonstandard" (and uncommon) it's not supported by all software. Many games lack any specific option for 1440x900 resolution. Windows (and thus DirectX) doesn't automatically recognize it. Intel (and thus the driver for their surprisingly powerful little HD Graphics 630 iGPU) doesn't explicitly support it.

(Quick and Easy)

1. Check your monitor manufacturer's website, they might offer a driver/patch/firmware which automagically corrects some or all of your resolution problems.

2. Check if your games offer any patches/updates which support 1440x900 (or whatever resolution you prefer).

3. Try setting your Windows Desktop to 1440x900 (or to whatever resolution you prefer in game). And use a wallpaper bitmap (.bmp) file which has that specific resolution. And disable Aero Glass, if you can. Maybe Restart.
It seems silly, but it sometimes works.

4. Try playing your games in OpenGL (or even OpenCL) instead of DirectX. A long shot, but it can fix resolution glitches caused Fullscreen/Windowed DX screen transitions.

(More Involved)

5. Force Windows "List All Modes" to include 1440x900 (or whatever resolution you prefer in game) through the Registry. Here's one method. Here's another method. And here's yet another method.
... Backup the Registry and Create a System Restore Point before changing these Registry data - lol, seriously! You want to let Windows have the option of "Reverting changes" so it can boot itself in "Last Known Good Configuration" ... unless you want to try fixing broken Windows display settings without being able to see any Windows GUI on a working display (only morons like yucky Safe Mode).

6. Reconfigure your iGPU settings. In BIOS, or through Windows Device Manager properties, or through the Intel HD Graphics Control Panel. In particular, look for options to increase (shared) memory buffers, lock resolution modes, or enable/define resolution (re)scaling behaviours. Too involved to go into here but google knows all.

(Costs Money)

7. Your M9H (iGPU) video outputs are HDMI 1.4b and DP 1.2 (many non-ASUS sites claim DP 1.2a, but Intel lied and their HD 630 doesn't support VESA Adaptive-Sync or AMD FreeSync, there's little reason ASUS would add a "useless" feature with increased component complexity and costs to this motherboard other than a compatibility gamble with future LGA1151 iGPUs actually/finally being sync-compliant).
... If your monitor has a DP port then suck it up and buy a DP-to-DP cable - it has bidirectional EDID and other signalling features which will let your monitor and your GPU work together instead of working apart - $10-$20 isn't really that "expensive", especially since you can continue to use this DP cable on the "good GPU" you plan to eventually purchase. And you can always return it to the vendor. But avoid non-certified (and underspec) DP cables, they might actually make your problems even worse.
... If your monitor does NOT have a DP port then it's probably better to avoid a DP-to-HDMI cable/adapter/converter. These interfaces contain active logic which basically "strips away" all DP signals and passes along synthetic HDMI signals, they often impose limits on display resolution or performance (refresh rates and raw fps), they sometimes even introduce their own parasitics or otherwise degrade the video signal and quality. You won't need one when you get your "good GPU". And they're comparatively "expensive".

8. Buy a new monitor which supports a different (bigger!) native resolution, along with HDMI 1.4b and/or DP 1.2 (or 1.2a).
Definitely "expensive".
"All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

[/Korth]

Korth wrote:
1440x900 (WXGA+, aka WSXGA, WXGA-II) is a nonstandard resolution with a nonstandard 5:3 widescreen aspect ratio. Wikipedia.

Because 1440x900 is "nonstandard" (and uncommon) it's not supported by all software. Many games lack any specific option for 1440x900 resolution. Windows (and thus DirectX) doesn't automatically recognize it. Intel (and thus the driver for their surprisingly powerful little HD Graphics 630 iGPU) doesn't explicitly support it.

(Quick and Easy)

1. Check your monitor manufacturer's website, they might offer a driver/patch/firmware which automagically corrects some or all of your resolution problems.

2. Check if your games offer any patches/updates which support 1440x900 (or whatever resolution you prefer).

3. Try setting your Windows Desktop to 1440x900 (or to whatever resolution you prefer in game). And use a wallpaper bitmap (.bmp) file which has that specific resolution. And disable Aero Glass, if you can. Maybe Restart.
It seems silly, but it sometimes works.

4. Try playing your games in OpenGL (or even OpenCL) instead of DirectX. A long shot, but it can fix resolution glitches caused Fullscreen/Windowed DX screen transitions.

(More Involved)

5. Force Windows "List All Modes" to include 1440x900 (or whatever resolution you prefer in game) through the Registry. Here's one method. Here's another method. And here's yet another method.
... Backup the Registry and Create a System Restore Point before changing these Registry data - lol, seriously! You want to let Windows have the option of "Reverting changes" so it can boot itself in "Last Known Good Configuration" ... unless you want to try fixing broken Windows display settings without being able to see any Windows GUI on a working display (only morons like yucky Safe Mode).

6. Reconfigure your iGPU settings. In BIOS, or through Windows Device Manager properties, or through the Intel HD Graphics Control Panel. In particular, look for options to increase (shared) memory buffers, lock resolution modes, or enable/define resolution (re)scaling behaviours. Too involved to go into here but google knows all.

(Costs Money)

7. Your M9H (iGPU) video outputs are HDMI 1.4b and DP 1.2 (many non-ASUS sites claim DP 1.2a, but Intel lied and their HD 630 doesn't support VESA Adaptive-Sync or AMD FreeSync, there's little reason ASUS would add a "useless" feature with increased component complexity and costs to this motherboard other than a compatibility gamble with future LGA1151 iGPUs actually/finally being sync-compliant).
... If your monitor has a DP port then suck it up and buy a DP-to-DP cable - it has bidirectional EDID and other signalling features which will let your monitor and your GPU work together instead of working apart - $10-$20 isn't really that "expensive", especially since you can continue to use this DP cable on the "good GPU" you plan to eventually purchase. And you can always return it to the vendor. But avoid non-certified (and underspec) DP cables, they might actually make your problems even worse.
... If your monitor does NOT have a DP port then it's probably better to avoid a DP-to-HDMI cable/adapter/converter. These interfaces contain active logic which basically "strips away" all DP signals and passes along synthetic HDMI signals, they often impose limits on display resolution or performance (refresh rates and raw fps), they sometimes even introduce their own parasitics or otherwise degrade the video signal and quality. You won't need one when you get your "good GPU". And they're comparatively "expensive".

8. Buy a new monitor which supports a different (bigger!) native resolution, along with HDMI 1.4b and/or DP 1.2 (or 1.2a).
Definitely "expensive".


here's pictures about the problem: http://imgur.com/a/fYfcO
(keep in mind, i took pictures instead just screen capture, to both show what happens during games at the default resolution, and the monitor OSD)

thanks for all the info, weird it's not standard, because i had 4-5 monitors\tvs with this resolution.. it was really common... and worked perfectly
well as i mentioned windows works as expected, it detects and defaults to 1440x900 no problem (it also says it's native)
the games also are aware that 1440x900 is the native resolution, they default to that resolution (for example valve games, there is the (native) mark...) and they automatically start with the 1440x900 resolution when i install them, however something happens on the gpu, because it's not outputting 1440x900..


this issue happens in every game in full screen.. i tested on 2 different monitors and even a tv which all uses this resolution...
i used tf2 as an example, but no matter the game, this happens...
this computer is a recent build, in my previous computer i had an nvidea gpu (which the bad PSU killed it along with the cpu) and i never had these issues... it worked perfectly, however this intel graphics got something wrong with them..

1440x900 may not be standard, but never had issues other than games not optimized for widescreen