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VIII Hero 2202 Shutdown Not Killing Power

Ruarc88
Level 7
This has happened twice now where I hit shutdown in Windows and the OS completely shuts down to no display signal but the system still has power. All lights, fans, and water pump remain on. First time after overclocking but just now on default power/OC settings.

Windows 7 64-bit on Intel 600p

Happened on both CoolerMaster V750 and just now on Corsair AX750 PSUs

Method I reset BIOS was removing AI Suite and then restore defaults in BIOS.
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7 REPLIES 7

iluv2fly
Level 7
Hello,

- Try to unplug as many cables as you can from your computer. Just leave the absolute minimum connected. Restart a couple of time and see if it that will take care of it. If it does then start reconnecting your items.

- If you have EA Games Origin running when you shut down, try to kill it before you shutdown (to see if Origin is the problem).

- Make sure windows has not installed a generic driver for one of your hardware components like soundcard, usb, and so on. It can screw things up. I had the same problem and it took me a while before I realized windows had installed generic soundcard drivers for my soundblaster card before I actually installed Soundblasters own drivers. So I had both installed at the same time and it created a problem. Once I discovered and uninstalled Windows generic drivers everything worked fine.

-Initially when my computer was hanging it did so because a conflict with USB 3.1. I disabled USB 3.1 in bios and the computer started to work as it should. I unplugged all my usb items and worked it from there then enabled usb 3.1 in the Bios and it has worked ever since.

You probably have some conflict between one or several devices. Less is more when you trouble shoot 😛

Good luck and let us know how it goes.

This easy fix helped to me:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDWtGC5VbEM

I hope it will help to you.

Machineman , your fix only applies to Win 10..he's on Win 7.

I've got the same issue. Shop that built system informed me that it wouldn't always restart. Then they declared it a windows bug and said they wash their hands of the matter. I was incredibly upset with them, but they already charged my Visa, so I picked it up, thinking I'll have to fix this myself. They ( A-Power) were incredibly useless, in that they don't have a tech with skills who can trouble shoot this and rectify it. Not only would it not restart every time but it wouldn't shut down. Same symptoms, systems makes shutdown click, OS shuts down, HD activity light off, monitor off but motherboard stays on with fans running. I kept a log, it would sometimes shut down properly every second time, and would go as far as only on the 7th time.

Did a lot of forum reading, lots of misinformation and useless opinions out there. Finally contacted Asus support, tech gave me 3 recommendations, The first was if I had it plugged into a surge protector, to plug it directly into wall. Tried that, unbelievably it worked. Shut down 7 times in succession and restarted properly also. Sent the tech a reply. I had 5 other devices plugged into my surge protector. Called the shop, spoke to the manager, they also had it plugged into a surge protector running multiple devices. He was surprised as was every one else as this makes no sense from a technical standpoint. I told him to tell all his useless minions about this., so they would not have to treat any one else in the appalling manner that I was.

Next day, went a bought a new surge protector to use exclusively for PC. First day 2 successful shutdowns. Next day..failed to shutdown. So I plugged it back into wall and it failed to shutdown also. Plugged it back into surge protector and now it randomly fails to shut down. The Asus tech 2nd idea, was to test the PS, or swap it with another to see if that does it. I have Corsair HX850i, seems to work good, don't have a way to test it or another PS to swap in. The 3rd idea was to pull the MB battery and clear the CMOS. Looks like I'll try that one next.

machineman wrote:
This easy fix helped to me:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDWtGC5VbEM

I hope it will help to you.


If you have an SSD, you can just delete the hibernate file via command prompt and it does the exact same thing, but deletes the hibernation file, gives you back some space on your drive causing less wear and tear on your SSD.

Open command prompt as admin. Type in the following minus the quotes. "powercfg -h off" and press Enter.
And that's it, you're good to go.

Thanks for suggestions. Expected emails but didn't get them 😕 I do indeed have fast boot enabled. Will disable this and try a few times but it seems to be occurring about once every dozen plus times so will be a while until I know for sure.

Power button I have configured for shutdown already. One of the first things I change. Sleep is disabled and never done a hibernate on the system.

I disabled Origin when I found out it doesn't have any bandwidth limiter. Did this before the first occurrence.

Will try to identify any generic drivers installed. When I installed Windows I installed all hardware drivers leaving network as last and only then did I connect to the network.

JustinThyme
Level 13
Changing from the wall outlet to a surge protector has precisely nothing to so with it. All that is in a surge suppressor are MOVs that by design will absorb any surge and if the surge is high enough they will become sacrificial lambs and self destruct to save whatever is plugged into it. They do not condition or change the input voltage in any way. Now lets look at the second half of that equation. your PSU is a power converter with rectifiers that convert the AC input to a regulated DC output and will provide a steady DC output with it being understood that the AC input must fall within the design tolerances. The only thing that can even remotely cause any issues that would change with a surge supressor is grounding issues on your AC supply or PSU.

There are the shut down command to the psu is done VIA ground. if you have noise on the ground by peripherals its possible to cause this issue but not very likely.
One way to prove or disprove the OS is rather simple. Download the free windows 10 media creator tool, you dont have to install. Make a bootable USB drive and boot from it having done a complete hard shut down and removing power for at least 30 seconds before booting. Instead of install select repair then troubleshoot. That should give you two options on the following page. Select shut down. If it shuts downs everything as it should the problem is your OS. If it does not its hardware related. Could be the MOBO not issuing the standby command to the PSU or the PSU not acting on it.

Ive had this happen several times usually after monkeying with one thing or another and every time without fail Ive gone to the default balanced power settings, selected advanced then when the window pops up selecting restore defaults in the lower right corner, apply and OK. Done.

In Win 10 fastboot AKA fast joke causes more problems that its worth. Ive seen no benifit from having it enabled however plenty of problems that are introduced because of the simple fact that if you want to reboot to reset you are not resetting, just simply reloading excatly what was present in ram before you shut down or restarted.



“Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity, I'm not sure about the former” ~ Albert Einstein

JustinThyme wrote:
Changing from the wall outlet to a surge protector has precisely nothing to so with it. All that is in a surge suppressor are MOVs that by design will absorb any surge and if the surge is high enough they will become sacrificial lambs and self destruct to save whatever is plugged into it. They do not condition or change the input voltage in any way. Now lets look at the second half of that equation. your PSU is a power converter with rectifiers that convert the AC input to a regulated DC output and will provide a steady DC output with it being understood that the AC input must fall within the design tolerances. The only thing that can even remotely cause any issues that would change with a surge supressor is grounding issues on your AC supply or PSU.

There are the shut down command to the psu is done VIA ground. if you have noise on the ground by peripherals its possible to cause this issue but not very likely.
One way to prove or disprove the OS is rather simple. Download the free windows 10 media creator tool, you dont have to install. Make a bootable USB drive and boot from it having done a complete hard shut down and removing power for at least 30 seconds before booting. Instead of install select repair then troubleshoot. That should give you two options on the following page. Select shut down. If it shuts downs everything as it should the problem is your OS. If it does not its hardware related. Could be the MOBO not issuing the standby command to the PSU or the PSU not acting on it.

Ive had this happen several times usually after monkeying with one thing or another and every time without fail Ive gone to the default balanced power settings, selected advanced then when the window pops up selecting restore defaults in the lower right corner, apply and OK. Done.

In Win 10 fastboot AKA fast joke causes more problems that its worth. Ive seen no benifit from having it enabled however plenty of problems that are introduced because of the simple fact that if you want to reboot to reset you are not resetting, just simply reloading excatly what was present in ram before you shut down or restarted.


Totally agree with disabling fastboot. I had an issue with my keyboard staying powered up. The other thing I found after researching it was there are things that need to be changed in the windows settings also for the power button so it shuts down correctly. By default it goes into sleep mode if I remember correctly. I'm no expert but I'm learning.