cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

New BIOS 1701

reupens
Level 7
Available for the Maximus VIII Hero and others.

Change log is just 'Improve system stability'.

Hero link: http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/LGA1151/MAXIMUS_VIII_HERO/MAXIMUS-VIII-HERO-ASUS-1701.zip
57,813 Views
82 REPLIES 82

bayfront_benny
Level 9
You should download the bios and use the ezflash flash 3 utility in the tools menu to find it and update - I always put it in my c: drive and navigate there. Never do it online too risky and pointless as it is a very small file.

Impsak
Level 7
Installed fine on my ASUS Maximus VIII Hero Alpha

Finally I'm able to use all 4 sticks from my g.skill 32GM kit and XMP profile with 1701

Before I could only run 2x8 (16GB) from my 32 gb memory kit with XMP profile.

G.Skill Ripjaws4 DDR4-2666 C15 QC - 32GB
DDR4, 32 GB : 4 x 8 GB, DIMM 288-pin, 2666 MHz / PC4-21300, CL15, 1.2 V, ikke-bufret, ikke-ECC
Model: F4-2666C15Q-32GRR (officially supported by this mobo)

Impsak wrote:
Installed fine on my ASUS Maximus VIII Hero Alpha

Finally I'm able to use all 4 sticks from my g.skill 32GM kit and XMP profile with 1701

Before I could only run 2x8 (16GB) from my 32 gb memory kit with XMP profile.

G.Skill Ripjaws4 DDR4-2666 C15 QC - 32GB
DDR4, 32 GB : 4 x 8 GB, DIMM 288-pin, 2666 MHz / PC4-21300, CL15, 1.2 V, ikke-bufret, ikke-ECC
Model: F4-2666C15Q-32GRR (officially supported by this mobo)


I had the exact same problem. Ended up sending back the g.skill memory. What exact model of G.skill are you using?

Eric_F
Level 10
With respect to retaining/restoring BIOS settings across upgrades, this is something that might be confusing to some. General-market PC's from the major OEMs usually can and do retain their current BIOS settings across an update. But these are far simpler BIOS configurations for non-overclock CPUs and a very limited spectrum of user-configurable options.

High-end PC hardware has too many options and configuration possibilities to guarantee stability after a BIOS update without resetting to default values. Just flash the BIOS, make sure it's reset to defaults for stability and re-enter the custom settings one-by-one.

I save my settings in an overclocking profile, which can be exported as a text file on a USB stick. Save the profile(s) you want to text and print them out to use as a guide to re-enter after an update. It takes me about 15 minutes to put everything back the way I want after a BIOS upgrade that way -- a little time spent is worth the performance to me. If you have a lot of custom DRAM timings set in BIOS, it might get more complex, but for a lot of systems the XMP profile just works.
Motherboard: Maximus VIII Hero
Processor: I7 6700K - 4.9GHz OC
CPU Cooler: Corsair H80i v2
Memory: G.Skill DDR4-3000 16GB
Graphics: EVGA GTX 1080 FTW2 1721/1860MHz
Storage #1: 1TB Western Digital Black
Storage #2: 2TB Western Digital Black
Case: Antec Nine Hundred
Power Supply: Antec Edge 650 80+ Gold
OS: Windows 10 Pro

Eric_F
Level 10
I've left mine at stock ratio so far, too. I may revisit that now that I've nailed down the software instability problem that me and lot of folks have been having -- AI Suite and ACPI.sys don't get along!

Encoding is driving both the CPU and memory bus to max demands simultaneously, that's what really makes it such a good stress test. I run Adaptive mode and set Additional Turbo to 1.4V, but then set LLC to allow VDROOP to drop the voltage to an actual 1.35 - 1.37 or so during encoding or similar loads. Any voltage spikes should stay reasonable under those conditions. IIRC my LLC is set to level 5 right now. If I want to keep encoding stable at 4.8 or 4.9GHz, I have to at least raise LLC to stiffen the input voltage supply, which pushes voltage closer to full 1.4V and more heat, plus more risks of high transient spikes. (Input current limits are set to 130% on CPU and memory; any lower and stability suffered.) I could try raising the voltage limit and dropping LLC back to get more VDROOP again, but I suspect the temps may still be higher than what I want. The system is running so well now that I'm leaving it alone for a while and enjoying some gaming... :cool:
Motherboard: Maximus VIII Hero
Processor: I7 6700K - 4.9GHz OC
CPU Cooler: Corsair H80i v2
Memory: G.Skill DDR4-3000 16GB
Graphics: EVGA GTX 1080 FTW2 1721/1860MHz
Storage #1: 1TB Western Digital Black
Storage #2: 2TB Western Digital Black
Case: Antec Nine Hundred
Power Supply: Antec Edge 650 80+ Gold
OS: Windows 10 Pro

Eric_F wrote:
I've left mine at stock ratio so far, too. I may revisit that now that I've nailed down the software instability problem that me and lot of folks have been having -- AI Suite and ACPI.sys don't get along!

Encoding is driving both the CPU and memory bus to max demands simultaneously, that's what really makes it such a good stress test. I run Adaptive mode and set Additional Turbo to 1.4V, but then set LLC to allow VDROOP to drop the voltage to an actual 1.35 - 1.37 or so during encoding or similar loads. Any voltage spikes should stay reasonable under those conditions. IIRC my LLC is set to level 5 right now. If I want to keep encoding stable at 4.8 or 4.9GHz, I have to at least raise LLC to stiffen the input voltage supply, which pushes voltage closer to full 1.4V and more heat, plus more risks of high transient spikes. (Input current limits are set to 130% on CPU and memory; any lower and stability suffered.) I could try raising the voltage limit and dropping LLC back to get more VDROOP again, but I suspect the temps may still be higher than what I want. The system is running so well now that I'm leaving it alone for a while and enjoying some gaming... :cool:


I might have to step down the clock a notch as well, im Prime95 stable for 12h+ but Realbench crashes straight away when it gets to the h264 coding part, messed around with it and it takes me 1.38v to be 100% stable for it.

Methinks its strange, im stable for anything (fold, gaming, image and video editing if i use other codecs) at 1.32v but need 1.38v for h264/h265 coding ? glad i don't use it often, had ~80c temps for a 2h test file i used...


Sorry for derailing the thread though, back to the BIOS part 57434
CPU: i7-6700k @4.7ghz
Cooler: Noctua NH-D15
GPU: Strix 980ti OC

RAM: 2x 8GB Ripjaws V 3200mhz C14
Motherboard: Maximus VIII Hero

SSD: 2x Samsung 850 EVO 250gb
HDD: 1x WD Black 4TB
PSU: EVGA SuperNOVA G2 750W Gold
CASE: Fractal Define R5 Black

OS: Windows 8.1 Pro 64bit

Kenrou wrote:
I Methinks its strange, im stable for anything (fold, gaming, image and video editing if i use other codecs) at 1.32v but need 1.38v for h264/h265 coding ? glad i don't use it often, had ~80c temps for a 2h test file i used...

Sorry for derailing the thread though, back to the BIOS part 57434


Not really derailed; my feeling is that 1601 and 1701 BIOS versions are definite improvements. Well worth updating to and going through all the settings by hand, all over again, and fine-tuning. High-performance PC's are very hands-on, no way around it.

Your system's behavior under encoding load isn't strange at all. It's precisely why declaring an overclock "stable" means different things to different people. If someone never anticipates running encoding, then they'll likely never run into problems by ignoring encoding stability. The system may be stable outside of edge-case use, for them. But just not 100% stable for someone who anticipates using it for everything under the sun, including encoding. Heck, that's where the OC profiles setting in the ASUS BIOS is handy -- you can set up different profiles for different use cases. Even if a profile isn't 100% stable for encoding, it might be perfectly fine for ultra-high performance in gaming, so it's specialized and still useful.

The Handbrake h.264 test in Realbench is there to test a specific type of loading -- near 100% loading on all threads/cores, heavy AVX use, plus heavy synchronized cache and memory I/O. It's a torture test to the redline on everything. The other tests allow more asynchronous operation. The Heavy Multitasking test includes Handbrake h.264 encoding, but it's a subset of other tasks (it's not permitted to take over like the singular h.264 Handbrake test) which will mask some stability problems that the singular h.264 test will reveal.

I found myself re-evaluating some of my settings on each BIOS update when I noticed better performance after first re-entering my old settings. Test in Realbench, tweak a little more and re-test, then run a test encode of some HD video in Handbrake for good measure. Each BIOS update has been an opportunity to make the system a little better each time.
Motherboard: Maximus VIII Hero
Processor: I7 6700K - 4.9GHz OC
CPU Cooler: Corsair H80i v2
Memory: G.Skill DDR4-3000 16GB
Graphics: EVGA GTX 1080 FTW2 1721/1860MHz
Storage #1: 1TB Western Digital Black
Storage #2: 2TB Western Digital Black
Case: Antec Nine Hundred
Power Supply: Antec Edge 650 80+ Gold
OS: Windows 10 Pro

Eric_F wrote:
I've left mine at stock ratio so far, too. I may revisit that now that I've nailed down the software instability problem that me and lot of folks have been having -- AI Suite and ACPI.sys don't get along!

Encoding is driving both the CPU and memory bus to max demands simultaneously, that's what really makes it such a good stress test. I run Adaptive mode and set Additional Turbo to 1.4V, but then set LLC to allow VDROOP to drop the voltage to an actual 1.35 - 1.37 or so during encoding or similar loads. Any voltage spikes should stay reasonable under those conditions. IIRC my LLC is set to level 5 right now. If I want to keep encoding stable at 4.8 or 4.9GHz, I have to at least raise LLC to stiffen the input voltage supply, which pushes voltage closer to full 1.4V and more heat, plus more risks of high transient spikes. (Input current limits are set to 130% on CPU and memory; any lower and stability suffered.) I could try raising the voltage limit and dropping LLC back to get more VDROOP again, but I suspect the temps may still be higher than what I want. The system is running so well now that I'm leaving it alone for a while and enjoying some gaming... :cool:



You seem to have a nice stable OC. Any chance you could share the BIOS file?

aceisme wrote:
You seem to have a nice stable OC. Any chance you could share the BIOS file?


Sure, if that's allowed. Though I'm new to the ROG board, so I'm not 100% familiar with the attachment rules / limits. The textfile dump should be easy to attach; don't know if the .CMO settings file is appropriate or possible to attach. Might be safer to use the textfile and hand-enter values since my hardware-specific settings -- memory, water pump and fans, some drives -- are going to be different.
Motherboard: Maximus VIII Hero
Processor: I7 6700K - 4.9GHz OC
CPU Cooler: Corsair H80i v2
Memory: G.Skill DDR4-3000 16GB
Graphics: EVGA GTX 1080 FTW2 1721/1860MHz
Storage #1: 1TB Western Digital Black
Storage #2: 2TB Western Digital Black
Case: Antec Nine Hundred
Power Supply: Antec Edge 650 80+ Gold
OS: Windows 10 Pro

Eric_F wrote:
Sure, if that's allowed. Though I'm new to the ROG board, so I'm not 100% familiar with the attachment rules / limits. The textfile dump should be easy to attach; don't know if the .CMO settings file is appropriate or possible to attach. Might be safer to use the textfile and hand-enter values since my hardware-specific settings -- memory, water pump and fans, some drives -- are going to be different.


Maybe you could upload it somewhere like dropbox or something and then paste the link? Otherwise I could give you an email address you could send it to.