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SecureBoot + UEFI + TPM 2.0 does not make an "old" PC Windows 11 compliant.

Axle_Grease
Level 7
I got myself a TPM 2.0 module ( SuperMicro AOM-TPM-9665V-C ) compatible with the Rampage V Extreme and Intel i7-5960X, but that does not make the PC Windows 11 compliant. Only one more step towards it. There's bound to be some under reported, obscure CPU features, that will get reported as "Your CPU is not Windows 11 compatible" or "Your CPU is too old" when lacking. At the moment TPM 2.0 being a must for Windows 11 compatibility is what tech news sites focus on, distorting the actual situation.

89993
"Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes." -- Unknown
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pharma
Level 9
Currently it seems you've passed the major requirements. To resolve minor issues like CPU Compatibility you will need to rely on "hacks" and registry changes within the Windows 11.

BigJohnny
Level 13
As of the latest update the registry hacks are disabled and ineffective. This has been all over the insider forum. I cant test it out but a lot of things from the TPM module to CPUs were on the list.

It also came with bugs. Had to uninstall Ique and Chrome and resintall/reboot as they both kept crashing. Seems OK ATM.

R6EE with embedded TPM and 10980XE running no problems. All of the old hacks for running older machines etc are being hacked right back and being disabled so all the information out right now wont help. Coming down to the wire as it goes for public release on Oct5.


89994

pharma
Level 9
It's still a bit early for effective re-engineering hacks to be released. They will likely appear after the official Win 11 release.

pharma wrote:
It's still a bit early for effective re-engineering hacks to be released. They will likely appear after the official Win 11 release.


I feel despondent that hacks are necessary to get Windows 11 to run properly on this fine specimen of gaming hardware. What is infuriating is how atrocious Microsoft is at conveying to the general pubic the specific CPU requirements for Windows 11. They might be as important as TPM 2.0. We just don't know, and that is purely the fault of Microsoft.
"Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes." -- Unknown

Axle Grease wrote:
I feel despondent that hacks are necessary to get Windows 11 to run properly on this fine specimen of gaming hardware. What is infuriating is how atrocious Microsoft is at conveying to the general pubic the specific CPU requirements for Windows 11. They might be as important as TPM 2.0. We just don't know, and that is purely the fault of Microsoft.

Is the CPU compatibility preventing you from getting updates without using "hacks"?

pharma wrote:
Is the CPU compatibility preventing you from getting updates without using "hacks"?


It would be his CPU, MS currently supports 7th Gen intel CPU's or later. For AMD its 2nd Gen Zen CPUs or later.
Read articles online saying that if you manage to hack Win 11 on older CPU's you will not receive windows updates.
MS is doing this to help OEMs sell new devices which I think is wrong considering the time we are in. Chip shortages in a pandemic worst time to do it.
At least with Win 10 it will be supported until 2025. Still plenty of time but it sucks considering myself I have 3x devices that will no longer be supported.

I either upgrade the entire lot or see if i can upgrade the CPU's

pharma
Level 9

pndiode
Level 11
True!

You’ll be able to run Windows 11 on older PCs—if you install the update manually

What some know and some do not know.

Quote from:

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/08/youll-be-able-to-run-windows-11-on-older-pcs-if-you-install-...

Microsoft officially announced some small additions to Windows 11's official CPU support list today, along with additional details about the operating system's security requirements. But another, quieter announcement should quell more of the system requirement-related angst: the Verge reports that Microsoft won't stop you from performing manual installs of Windows 11 on systems that don't meet the official requirements. That means that people running Windows 10 on unsupported systems won't be offered Windows 11 through Windows Update, but you'll still be able to update if you download an ISO file and perform an upgrade or a clean install manually.

This will be a particular boon to PCs right on the border of Windows 11's system requirements, like those running 6th- or 7th-generation Intel Core CPUs or first-generation AMD Ryzen processors. These chips are missing support for a few esoteric optional security requirements but can otherwise meet the performance and Secure Boot and TPM 2.0 requirements and still get modern DCH driver support from Intel, AMD, and most PC OEMs.

Microsoft is still actively recommending that you don't run Windows 11 on any system that doesn't meet the official support criteria. According to data from PCs running the Insider Preview builds, Microsoft says that PCs that didn't meet the requirements had "52% more kernel mode crashes" than PCs that did and that first-party apps crashed 43 percent more often on unsupported hardware. But allowing users to make the decision for themselves is arguably what the company should have done in the first place. People who don't seek out the Windows 11 update will never be offered it if their hardware isn't up to snuff, but advanced users, testers, and IT departments who do want to run the latest software on their computers can evaluate the trade-offs and make the decision for themselves.

The current Insider Preview versions of the Windows 11 ISOs will halt if your system is missing either Secure Boot or a TPM (though it's fine with a TPM 1.2 module, despite the operating system's official TPM 2.0 requirement). You can get around this limitation with a couple of quick Windows Registry hacks; we don't yet know whether the final Windows 11 ISOs will make the same system checks. We've asked Microsoft for more details and will follow up if we get a response.

xmanrigger
Level 12
I am going to step out on a limb to say TPM is little to do with security, but more to do with tracking PCs and usage. There is likely an unique identifier in each TPM chip. Coincidence that this is being implemented the same time as this contrived global crisis?

Call me a nut. But something to think about.
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