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R5E + 5820K + M.2 Nvme + Pcie nvme

racecar
Level 7
Hello,

I want to ask that this combination of 960 pro in m2 and Intel 750 in a long black slot will have no limitations with 28 cpu lanes.

Config: 1x 1080i, 1x 960 pro, 1x 750 intel, 1x STX2 soundcard.

Thanks
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Brighttail
Level 11
Your 1080 should take x16 and the 960 and 750 should take x4 each. The sound card should then have 4 PCI lanes left.
Overall the number PCI-e lanes from your CPU shouldn't be an issue. I cannot speak on whether you won't have a conflict between the 960pro and the 750 intel.
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750 must be in RED PCIe slot for full speed. So does that mean it consumes 8 lanes?

So.. GPU - x16, 750 in red slot x8 lanes, M.2 NVMe x4 and soundcard x2? That is 30.

Yes the intel 750 must be in the red slots as they are pcie 3.0 but it only takes 4 lanes not 8.
To reach full speed it need 4x pcie 3.0.
The black one is only pcie 2.0 4x not good for the 750, but good for the sound card.

I have only a GPU in the 1st slot, so 16X, the 2nd slot is empty, the 3rd (Black one pcie 2.0) i have a PCI2.0 SSD from Muskin
(it only requires 2 lanes pice 2.0), i think the Black pcie dont take lanes from the CPU as it share bandwidth with usb and sata express connectors,
a Intel 750 400GB in the 4th (4 lanes), and the 5th empty (this one share lanes with the M.2 slot),
In the M.2 slot i have a Samsung 950Pro that takes 4 lanes (pcie 3.0).
I have a 40 lanes CPU but with a 28 lanes CPU it works fine too.
In the end 16X(GPU) + 4X (Intel750) + 4x (Samsung 950pro)=24 lanes total.


In you case you have 2 GPU`s and a 28 lanes CPU right?
So i guess GPU 8X 1st slot, the 2 GPU in the 4th slot 8X, intel 750 in the 2nd slot 4x and 4 more lanes for tha M.2 ssd
Put the sound card in the black slot, 2 lanes not from the CPU.
In the end 8X + 4X + 8X + 4X = 24 lanes in use.
You can`t put the intel 750 in the last slot as it share lanes with the M.2 slot and it will turn off if you do.

If it work`s you end up with 16X + 8X + 4X(share between the intel750 and the M.2 SSD= not good)

Korth
Level 14
Samsung 960 PRO is M.2 form factor (internally a 4xPCIe3.0 interface) with NVMe revision 1.2.
The rated specifications of this drive are up to 3500MB/s Read and up to 2100MB/s Write, which is pretty good (this interface allows a theoretical maximum of 3938MB/s total Read/Write throughput).

Intel 750 is a PCIe or SATA form factor (4xPCIe3.0 interface or SATA3 interface) with NVMe revision 1.0c. An M.2 adapter cable is included to link the SSD into the motherboard M.2 slot.
The rated specifications (on the best versions) of this drive are up to 2400MB/s Read and up to 1200MB/s Write - but only with the link adapter plugged into M.2 slot.
Without the M.2 link, these drives default to slower AHCI/SATA3 protocols.

NVMe is technically only an improved instruction/addressing protocol - it allows more commands to run more efficiently in parallel or in queue. It does not in itself indicate a faster, better, newer drive - although the faster, better, newer drives tend to include NVMe and advertise it proudly, the marketing confuses the consumers. NVMe isn't something that makes your games and programs load faster - a fast drive with fast specs will make your games and programs load faster (regardless whether it has NVMe or not).

In a nutshell, NVMe generally makes real-world performance a little better, more Read/Write data per second. It never hurts. But (like DDR4-4266 or 256GB memory capacities) it's hardware which is basically designed to optimize specific (and deliberate) usage scenarios the overwhelming majority of consumers will never actually use. Both of these devices (along with most other M.2/NVMe/PCIe SSD devices) are already "overkill" for gaming.

16xPCIe3 for GPU, 4xPCIe3 for Samsung SSD, 1xPCIe3 for Xonar = 21xPCIe3. Intel 750 requires 4xPCIe3 (plus M.2!) so adding it will muck everything around - and it'll knock your GPU to 8xPCIe3 which will limit gaming fps/performance under heavy load.

Don't buy into the hype. Intel 750 is good. But not as good as it looks: it was the "best" back when it was new, it's still considered the "best" by some Enterprise/Server folks who swear by Intel products and Intel support. But Samsung 960 is better: it has better specs, it's faster, it's guaranteed to last longer, it costs less.
"All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

[/Korth]

Thank you for your exhaustive answers. I just wanted to know if my card will go in x16 mode if I plug in all the components and the Intel SSD will be in red slot slot.

As for the 750 NVMe, I had it at the price of a SATA SSD. It's a PCIe version.

Thank you for your exhaustive answers. I just wanted to know if my card will go in x16 mode if I plug in all the components and the Intel SSD will be in red slot slot.

As for the 750 NVMe, I had it at the price of a SATA SSD. It's a PCIe version.

Brighttail
Level 11
Lets get something straight. Samsung 960/950 line is great for sequential reading large files, but not so much real world read/write of small files. The intel 750 has the IOPS that trounced the Samsung 950 and while the 960 is much better, in many tests, the 750 intel still wins.

Overall I think the Samsung 960 is a bit more flexible and better as the overall drive, but it all depends on how strict Intel will be on their whole VROC system. If Intel refuses to let Samsung, OCZ, WD and other M.2 manufacturers the in ability to use VROC to make bootable drives on their new x299 platform, then year, Intel is going to be ahead. This is especially true if Intel prevents the bootable drive from happening on the chipset side like happens with the z270 mbs.
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Brighttail wrote:
Lets get something straight. Samsung 960/950 line is great for sequential reading large files, but not so much real world read/write of small files. The intel 750 has the IOPS that trounced the Samsung 950 and while the 960 is much better, in many tests, the 750 intel still wins.

Overall I think the Samsung 960 is a bit more flexible and better as the overall drive, but it all depends on how strict Intel will be on their whole VROC system. If Intel refuses to let Samsung, OCZ, WD and other M.2 manufacturers the in ability to use VROC to make bootable drives on their new x299 platform, then year, Intel is going to be ahead. This is especially true if Intel prevents the bootable drive from happening on the chipset side like happens with the z270 mbs.


Intel 750 SSD specs
Samsung 960 PRO SSD specs

Where can I find some of these "many tests" you mention? Here's a UserBenchmark comparison which suggests a different story.

Comparing raw specs: the Intel SSDs have some better IOPS, especially for Writes, but not at all by a "trouncing" margin. The Samsung M.2s have some better IOPS, too, they may be mere consumer products, but they are indeed hard performers. Remember, too, that NVMe makes greater use of larger/multiple queue depths.

Okay, if you want the insane performance of VROC then you gotta buy Intel. But it seems kinda niche, lol, not a lot of people are going to put many (up to 20?) of these drives into a bootable RAID.

Non-Intel drives (including 960 PRO drives) can definitely still be used to boot Z270 mobos, lol. They can even be set up in bootable RAIDs.

I'm not saying that Intel 750 is clearly inferior all across the board. I'm saying the Samsung 960 PRO is definitely a better choice for the vast majority of consumers.
"All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

[/Korth]

Korth wrote:
Intel 750 SSD specs
Samsung 960 PRO SSD specs

Where can I find some of these "many tests" you mention? Here's a UserBenchmark comparison which suggests a different story.

Comparing raw specs: the Intel SSDs have some better IOPS, especially for Writes, but not at all by a "trouncing" margin. The Samsung M.2s have some better IOPS, too, they may be mere consumer products, but they are indeed hard performers. Remember, too, that NVMe makes greater use of larger/multiple queue depths.

Okay, if you want the insane performance of VROC then you gotta buy Intel. But it seems kinda niche, lol, not a lot of people are going to put many (up to 20?) of these drives into a bootable RAID.

Non-Intel drives (including 960 PRO drives) can definitely still be used to boot Z270 mobos, lol. They can even be set up in bootable RAIDs.

I'm not saying that Intel 750 is clearly inferior all across the board. I'm saying the Samsung 960 PRO is definitely a better choice for the vast majority of consumers.


The question is will the x299 allow you to NOT use VROC but still use a bootable RAID drive off the chipset like the z270 for non-Intel drives?
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