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Problem with mic(very low noise) on SupremeFX

Koutport
Level 7
Hello,
Is there any news about the problem with the low noise of mic on SupremeFX? I install the new beta drivers but nothing at all with the mic...
Any ideas?
Thanx
George.
Μobo:ROG STRIX Z790-F GAMING WIFI-CPU:Intel Core i9-14900K-Cooler:EKW-EK-KIT RGB 360-RAM:G.SKILL Trident Z5 DDR5-6400 CL32 64GB(4 x 16 GB)-GPU:ASUS GeForce® ASUS ROG STRIX GAMING RTX-3080Ti-#43; EKW-EK-KIT 480 RGB -PSU:Corsair HX1200i:HDD:Samsung M2 980 PRO with heatsink 2TB+Samsung 990 PRO 2 TB RAID-0 +Asus RAIDR Express 240GB- Case:Thermaltake View 91 Tempered Glass RGB Editionx
2,949 Views
5 REPLIES 5

Korth
Level 14
Have you tried adjusting mic sensitivity in software? Have you tried uninstalling and reinstalling the audio drivers?

The R5E's integrated audio hardware is EMI isolated and RFI shielded, I think unlikely to cause this fault.

I would check the mic itself, it could just be "noisy" - a dirty transducer, faulty solder connects, frayed wiring, loose connector, etc. It could just be a cheap junky product (even when it's a costly brand-name product, lol). The easiest way to confirm is to compare your mic vs other mics, if you have access to any.

You could scrub the mic jack (and jack port) with a Q-Tip and an electrical contact cleaner like DeoxIT, Stabilant-22 aka "Tweek", or >99% isopropyl alcohol. This won't really help if the connection is already electrically clean, it'll do wonders if the connection is corroded or filthy. I'm assuming you've got gold-on-gold contact (not cheaper tin-on-gold or copper-on-gold or aluminum-on-gold, which produce electrical interference after these dissimilar metals almost-invisibly corrode through "galvanic-fretting").

Avoid running audio (and mic) wires near each other, avoid running them near other wiring (especially power-carrying or high-density-signalling wires), avoid running them near oscillating motors (fans, pumps, HDDs, ODDs), avoid running them near inductive or EMI-noisy components (transformers, inverters, ballasts and baluns, Cold Cathode lights), avoid pinching or bending or stretching them, avoid excessive lengths. Ideally you'd want a quality braided copper audio wire, preferably lower-gauge (thicker) than the minimum required, with good insulation, with properly soldered (and insulated) electrical connections, run straight and true, measured and cut to exactly 10mm longer than required, lol.

PC chassis makers (most notoriously Corsair and Cooler Master) often produce excellent cases made with good materials and workmanship and truly lousy, substandard (below-spec) electrical wiring. Complaints about HD Audio quality and USB performances are common with many cases, if the wiring built into your HAF case happens to be garbage then you may need to rewire it. The easiest way to confirm is to compare audio quality with your mic plugged into the chassis ports vs mic plugged directly into motherboard ports.

On the plus side, you might have an opportunity to install custom wiring into your PC, with custom connectors and custom sleeving/tubing/braiding and fancy LEDs and chromed bling and op-amps and line filters and knobs and dials and whatever else you may desire - the schema for such things are all over the internet and the parts/materials are widely available at nearly trivial cost.
"All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

[/Korth]

Korth wrote:
Have you tried adjusting mic sensitivity in software? Have you tried uninstalling and reinstalling the audio drivers?

The R5E's integrated audio hardware is EMI isolated and RFI shielded, I think unlikely to cause this fault.

I would check the mic itself, it could just be "noisy" - a dirty transducer, faulty solder connects, frayed wiring, loose connector, etc. It could just be a cheap junky product (even when it's a costly brand-name product, lol). The easiest way to confirm is to compare your mic vs other mics, if you have access to any.

You could scrub the mic jack (and jack port) with a Q-Tip and an electrical contact cleaner like DeoxIT, Stabilant-22 aka "Tweek", or >99% isopropyl alcohol. This won't really help if the connection is already electrically clean, it'll do wonders if the connection is corroded or filthy. I'm assuming you've got gold-on-gold contact (not cheaper tin-on-gold or copper-on-gold or aluminum-on-gold, which produce electrical interference after these dissimilar metals almost-invisibly corrode through "galvanic-fretting").

Avoid running audio (and mic) wires near each other, avoid running them near other wiring (especially power-carrying or high-density-signalling wires), avoid running them near oscillating motors (fans, pumps, HDDs, ODDs), avoid running them near inductive or EMI-noisy components (transformers, inverters, ballasts and baluns, Cold Cathode lights), avoid pinching or bending or stretching them, avoid excessive lengths. Ideally you'd want a quality braided copper audio wire, preferably lower-gauge (thicker) than the minimum required, with good insulation, with properly soldered (and insulated) electrical connections, run straight and true, measured and cut to exactly 10mm longer than required, lol.

PC chassis makers (most notoriously Corsair and Cooler Master) often produce excellent cases made with good materials and workmanship and truly lousy, substandard (below-spec) electrical wiring. Complaints about HD Audio quality and USB performances are common with many cases, if the wiring built into your HAF case happens to be garbage then you may need to rewire it. The easiest way to confirm is to compare audio quality with your mic plugged into the chassis ports vs mic plugged directly into motherboard ports.

On the plus side, you might have an opportunity to install custom wiring into your PC, with custom connectors and custom sleeving/tubing/braiding and fancy LEDs and chromed bling and op-amps and line filters and knobs and dials and whatever else you may desire - the schema for such things are all over the internet and the parts/materials are widely available at nearly trivial cost.


I reinstall the drivers two times the problem remains.There is not problem with mic(headphones razer carcharias) because when I connect to rear or front panel (realtek card)to case (cooler master haf 932x) all with the mic its ok! I adjust the sensitivity in software supremeFX HIFI without any result!*
thanx
George*
Μobo:ROG STRIX Z790-F GAMING WIFI-CPU:Intel Core i9-14900K-Cooler:EKW-EK-KIT RGB 360-RAM:G.SKILL Trident Z5 DDR5-6400 CL32 64GB(4 x 16 GB)-GPU:ASUS GeForce® ASUS ROG STRIX GAMING RTX-3080Ti-#43; EKW-EK-KIT 480 RGB -PSU:Corsair HX1200i:HDD:Samsung M2 980 PRO with heatsink 2TB+Samsung 990 PRO 2 TB RAID-0 +Asus RAIDR Express 240GB- Case:Thermaltake View 91 Tempered Glass RGB Editionx

Korth wrote:
Have you tried adjusting mic sensitivity in software? Have you tried uninstalling and reinstalling the audio drivers?

The R5E's integrated audio hardware is EMI isolated and RFI shielded, I think unlikely to cause this fault.

I would check the mic itself, it could just be "noisy" - a dirty transducer, faulty solder connects, frayed wiring, loose connector, etc. It could just be a cheap junky product (even when it's a costly brand-name product, lol). The easiest way to confirm is to compare your mic vs other mics, if you have access to any.

You could scrub the mic jack (and jack port) with a Q-Tip and an electrical contact cleaner like DeoxIT, Stabilant-22 aka "Tweek", or >99% isopropyl alcohol. This won't really help if the connection is already electrically clean, it'll do wonders if the connection is corroded or filthy. I'm assuming you've got gold-on-gold contact (not cheaper tin-on-gold or copper-on-gold or aluminum-on-gold, which produce electrical interference after these dissimilar metals almost-invisibly corrode through "galvanic-fretting").

Avoid running audio (and mic) wires near each other, avoid running them near other wiring (especially power-carrying or high-density-signalling wires), avoid running them near oscillating motors (fans, pumps, HDDs, ODDs), avoid running them near inductive or EMI-noisy components (transformers, inverters, ballasts and baluns, Cold Cathode lights), avoid pinching or bending or stretching them, avoid excessive lengths. Ideally you'd want a quality braided copper audio wire, preferably lower-gauge (thicker) than the minimum required, with good insulation, with properly soldered (and insulated) electrical connections, run straight and true, measured and cut to exactly 10mm longer than required, lol.

PC chassis makers (most notoriously Corsair and Cooler Master) often produce excellent cases made with good materials and workmanship and truly lousy, substandard (below-spec) electrical wiring. Complaints about HD Audio quality and USB performances are common with many cases, if the wiring built into your HAF case happens to be garbage then you may need to rewire it. The easiest way to confirm is to compare audio quality with your mic plugged into the chassis ports vs mic plugged directly into motherboard ports.

On the plus side, you might have an opportunity to install custom wiring into your PC, with custom connectors and custom sleeving/tubing/braiding and fancy LEDs and chromed bling and op-amps and line filters and knobs and dials and whatever else you may desire - the schema for such things are all over the internet and the parts/materials are widely available at nearly trivial cost.

Pls read this link.
https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?86298-RVE10-SupremeFX-Hi-Fi-Front-Panel-Problems
Μobo:ROG STRIX Z790-F GAMING WIFI-CPU:Intel Core i9-14900K-Cooler:EKW-EK-KIT RGB 360-RAM:G.SKILL Trident Z5 DDR5-6400 CL32 64GB(4 x 16 GB)-GPU:ASUS GeForce® ASUS ROG STRIX GAMING RTX-3080Ti-#43; EKW-EK-KIT 480 RGB -PSU:Corsair HX1200i:HDD:Samsung M2 980 PRO with heatsink 2TB+Samsung 990 PRO 2 TB RAID-0 +Asus RAIDR Express 240GB- Case:Thermaltake View 91 Tempered Glass RGB Editionx

Korth wrote:
Have you tried adjusting mic sensitivity in software? Have you tried uninstalling and reinstalling the audio drivers?

The R5E's integrated audio hardware is EMI isolated and RFI shielded, I think unlikely to cause this fault.

I would check the mic itself, it could just be "noisy" - a dirty transducer, faulty solder connects, frayed wiring, loose connector, etc. It could just be a cheap junky product (even when it's a costly brand-name product, lol). The easiest way to confirm is to compare your mic vs other mics, if you have access to any.

You could scrub the mic jack (and jack port) with a Q-Tip and an electrical contact cleaner like DeoxIT, Stabilant-22 aka "Tweek", or >99% isopropyl alcohol. This won't really help if the connection is already electrically clean, it'll do wonders if the connection is corroded or filthy. I'm assuming you've got gold-on-gold contact (not cheaper tin-on-gold or copper-on-gold or aluminum-on-gold, which produce electrical interference after these dissimilar metals almost-invisibly corrode through "galvanic-fretting").

Avoid running audio (and mic) wires near each other, avoid running them near other wiring (especially power-carrying or high-density-signalling wires), avoid running them near oscillating motors (fans, pumps, HDDs, ODDs), avoid running them near inductive or EMI-noisy components (transformers, inverters, ballasts and baluns, Cold Cathode lights), avoid pinching or bending or stretching them, avoid excessive lengths. Ideally you'd want a quality braided copper audio wire, preferably lower-gauge (thicker) than the minimum required, with good insulation, with properly soldered (and insulated) electrical connections, run straight and true, measured and cut to exactly 10mm longer than required, lol.

PC chassis makers (most notoriously Corsair and Cooler Master) often produce excellent cases made with good materials and workmanship and truly lousy, substandard (below-spec) electrical wiring. Complaints about HD Audio quality and USB performances are common with many cases, if the wiring built into your HAF case happens to be garbage then you may need to rewire it. The easiest way to confirm is to compare audio quality with your mic plugged into the chassis ports vs mic plugged directly into motherboard ports.

On the plus side, you might have an opportunity to install custom wiring into your PC, with custom connectors and custom sleeving/tubing/braiding and fancy LEDs and chromed bling and op-amps and line filters and knobs and dials and whatever else you may desire - the schema for such things are all over the internet and the parts/materials are widely available at nearly trivial cost.


Pls reaf this link

https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?86298-RVE10-SupremeFX-Hi-Fi-Front-Panel-Problems
Μobo:ROG STRIX Z790-F GAMING WIFI-CPU:Intel Core i9-14900K-Cooler:EKW-EK-KIT RGB 360-RAM:G.SKILL Trident Z5 DDR5-6400 CL32 64GB(4 x 16 GB)-GPU:ASUS GeForce® ASUS ROG STRIX GAMING RTX-3080Ti-#43; EKW-EK-KIT 480 RGB -PSU:Corsair HX1200i:HDD:Samsung M2 980 PRO with heatsink 2TB+Samsung 990 PRO 2 TB RAID-0 +Asus RAIDR Express 240GB- Case:Thermaltake View 91 Tempered Glass RGB Editionx

Korth wrote:
Have you tried adjusting mic sensitivity in software? Have you tried uninstalling and reinstalling the audio drivers?

The R5E's integrated audio hardware is EMI isolated and RFI shielded, I think unlikely to cause this fault.

I would check the mic itself, it could just be "noisy" - a dirty transducer, faulty solder connects, frayed wiring, loose connector, etc. It could just be a cheap junky product (even when it's a costly brand-name product, lol). The easiest way to confirm is to compare your mic vs other mics, if you have access to any.

You could scrub the mic jack (and jack port) with a Q-Tip and an electrical contact cleaner like DeoxIT, Stabilant-22 aka "Tweek", or >99% isopropyl alcohol. This won't really help if the connection is already electrically clean, it'll do wonders if the connection is corroded or filthy. I'm assuming you've got gold-on-gold contact (not cheaper tin-on-gold or copper-on-gold or aluminum-on-gold, which produce electrical interference after these dissimilar metals almost-invisibly corrode through "galvanic-fretting").

Avoid running audio (and mic) wires near each other, avoid running them near other wiring (especially power-carrying or high-density-signalling wires), avoid running them near oscillating motors (fans, pumps, HDDs, ODDs), avoid running them near inductive or EMI-noisy components (transformers, inverters, ballasts and baluns, Cold Cathode lights), avoid pinching or bending or stretching them, avoid excessive lengths. Ideally you'd want a quality braided copper audio wire, preferably lower-gauge (thicker) than the minimum required, with good insulation, with properly soldered (and insulated) electrical connections, run straight and true, measured and cut to exactly 10mm longer than required, lol.

PC chassis makers (most notoriously Corsair and Cooler Master) often produce excellent cases made with good materials and workmanship and truly lousy, substandard (below-spec) electrical wiring. Complaints about HD Audio quality and USB performances are common with many cases, if the wiring built into your HAF case happens to be garbage then you may need to rewire it. The easiest way to confirm is to compare audio quality with your mic plugged into the chassis ports vs mic plugged directly into motherboard ports.

On the plus side, you might have an opportunity to install custom wiring into your PC, with custom connectors and custom sleeving/tubing/braiding and fancy LEDs and chromed bling and op-amps and line filters and knobs and dials and whatever else you may desire - the schema for such things are all over the internet and the parts/materials are widely available at nearly trivial cost.

***
Μobo:ROG STRIX Z790-F GAMING WIFI-CPU:Intel Core i9-14900K-Cooler:EKW-EK-KIT RGB 360-RAM:G.SKILL Trident Z5 DDR5-6400 CL32 64GB(4 x 16 GB)-GPU:ASUS GeForce® ASUS ROG STRIX GAMING RTX-3080Ti-#43; EKW-EK-KIT 480 RGB -PSU:Corsair HX1200i:HDD:Samsung M2 980 PRO with heatsink 2TB+Samsung 990 PRO 2 TB RAID-0 +Asus RAIDR Express 240GB- Case:Thermaltake View 91 Tempered Glass RGB Editionx