cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Network - WiFi / LAN question: can they both be used at the same time?

red454
Level 11
Perhaps this is a lame question, but when you have the WiFi enabled on your RVE, and you are connected via WiFi to your router, and the Ethernet cable is also plugged into the router, is there any advantage? Or is it OS dependent and you are only on your network with either LAN or WiFi, but not both at the same time?
ASUS Rampage V Extreme BIOS 4101 | i7-6950X | Thermaltake Core X9 | G.Skill F4-2800C16Q-32GRK | Cooler Master Nepton 280L | Dual Samsung 850EVO 500GB SSD | PSU: DARK POWER PRO 11 1000W | 3TB & 4TB HDD | NVIDIA GTX Titan X | ASUS 24x DVD±RW Drive | Win10 Pro
4,962 Views
5 REPLIES 5

xeromist
Moderator
I'd say it's unlikely to make an appreciable difference. WiFi is much slower than gigabit networking. I might try bonding two gigabit network connections if I needed to do a lot of network transfers with a content server (video editing over a network). But most consumer network hardware isn't up to the task anyway. You'd want small business network hardware and a purpose built fast content server.
A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. On my desk, I have a work station…

xeromist wrote:
I'd say it's unlikely to make an appreciable difference. WiFi is much slower than gigabit networking. I might try bonding two gigabit network connections if I needed to do a lot of network transfers with a content server (video editing over a network). But most consumer network hardware isn't up to the task anyway. You'd want small business network hardware and a purpose built fast content server.


I see - well, I move a lot of data between my drives on my RVE and my server (ethernet), and it seemed like the WiFi was just low hanging fruit, not being utilized. As you say, probably wouldn't notice much difference. But before I put any time into it, I wanted to see if it was common knowledge with using both at the same time.
ASUS Rampage V Extreme BIOS 4101 | i7-6950X | Thermaltake Core X9 | G.Skill F4-2800C16Q-32GRK | Cooler Master Nepton 280L | Dual Samsung 850EVO 500GB SSD | PSU: DARK POWER PRO 11 1000W | 3TB & 4TB HDD | NVIDIA GTX Titan X | ASUS 24x DVD±RW Drive | Win10 Pro

xeromist
Moderator
If you think you could benefit from faster speeds Linus Tech Tips has done several Youtube videos on connection bonding & such. Seems like it was a pain to get working but it was working eventually. If you are hoping for a quick and easy win I don't think there is one but you can certainly attain higher speeds if you want to put a little time & money into it.
A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. On my desk, I have a work station…

davemon50
Level 11
OK so by chance I had to be connected in the fashion that you suggested in your OP. Yes, it does connect to both networks at once, at least on the RVE10 which is what I am using.

The reason I did it was different though, I couldn't get W10 to initiate file and printer sharing between my Ethernet-wired desktop computer in my office and my 3 remote laptops in the house that are all WiFi served. In order to get it to work I turned on the WiFi to the desktop as well and connected all machines to the same WiFi network, after which I was able to add each computer to each other's safe settings and join the common network. After that I was able to turn off the WiFi and I generally keep it off even with file sharing. I never tried to transfer data over the two and compare speeds though, as you suggest.

At the moment I'm on the desktop, so I just now turned back on WiFi to check how it appears, and if you go to the Network & Sharing Center dialogue box, once connected you will see BOTH networks connected simultaneously, sort of proving you are connected via each.
Davemon50