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Dying 5960x or RVE?

KOGE19
Level 8
Hello All,

I have a RVE + 5960x+3000MHz 64 GB dominator. The 5960x is running at 4.5 GHz. my Power supply is 1500W Silverstone Strider ST1500. I am running the latest Bios RAMPAGE-V-EXTREME-ASUS-3902. I use Intel Burn Test for OC testing.

I think that my RVE is slowly killing my 5960x because the stable OC settings I used for 1 year has needed stepped increases in VCore, VCache , VCCSA and VIN in the last 12 months. I noticed the instability due to crashes while running normal programs.


Unfortunately, the system is now unstable again and I am using it at stock settings where the RAM is running at 2400 MHz. Any ideas if the board or CPU needs changing. I did use a set of 64 GB Hyperx DDR4 3000(replacing the dominator) and still had the crashes. My bigger concern is how a once stable OC is now unstable. Any ideas or suggestions?

These are the changes in values from 2 years ago and now . The values to the right of the '->' are the values which I have now


CPU Core Voltage : Adaptive Mode, Offset [0.230] -> [0.244]

Additional Turbo Mode CPU Core Voltage : [0.019] -> [0.030]


CPU Cache Voltage : Offset Mode, [0.180] -> [0.220]



System Agent : Offset Mode : Sign [+] [0.220] -> [0.240]


CPU Input Voltage : 1.900 -> 1.910



VCCIO CPU 1.05V Voltage : 1.05000 -> 1.06250


VCCIO PCH 1.05V Voltage : 1.05000 -> 1.06250


PCH Core Voltage : Auto


PCH I/O Voltage : [Auto]



Any help appreciated, I am inclined to think it is the board because last time round swapping the board out fixed the issue . see here:
https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?91441-Issues-running-3000-MHz-Dominator-Kits-on-5960x
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6 REPLIES 6

Arne_Saknussemm
Level 40
The offset values mean nothing...it's the actual voltage values that would make some sense

But if that's all on the same BIOS then it seems there is significant degradation.

By the way the RVE wont kill anything...unless you tell it to

Arne Saknussemm wrote:
The offset values mean nothing...it's the actual voltage values that would make some sense

But if that's all on the same BIOS then it seems there is significant degradation.

By the way the RVE wont kill anything...unless you tell it to



Yes , all this happened on the same BIOS. I am currently on the new BIOS though.

If it is degradation ,what option do I have? Can I send the chip back to INTEL for warranty claim. Also what should I mention the reason for failure as?

Thanks,

Arne_Saknussemm
Level 40
Intel warranty is for stock only...if it needed more voltage to run at stock you could send it back...assuming it's still in warranty period...you can check that at Intel site

I'd try "aliens" first and then own up if that doesn't work...:rolleyes::o

Arne Saknussemm wrote:
Intel warranty is for stock only...if it needed more voltage to run at stock you could send it back...assuming it's still in warranty period...you can check that at Intel site

I'd try "aliens" first and then own up if that doesn't work...:rolleyes:



Yes, its still in warranty. I am inclined to check another 5960x or RVE. This is the second RVE which has had this issue so far, so somehow I feel the board has something to do with this.

Thanks Arne. I think I will just stick to stock for now and see if it gets worse. This is probably going to be the last time I do an overclocked build - the amount of time I have wasted doing this could have been put to better use.

Thanks once again.

Vlada011
Level 10
People usually push processors to their end from start and later become unstable.
Ideal OC for Haswell-E is 4.2-4.3GHz maybe. Not 4.5-4.6GHz... that couldn't last long.
Better to run processors on stock speed first, than after 1-2 years little OC and before you change platform when CPU is few years old to drain last MHz from him.

People are too much occupied with benchmark results and Intel's sponsored reviews about improvement of every new generation.
In real life you can't see difference between I7-5960X on 4.3GHz or 4.5GHz, and sometimes voltage need for that is huge.
Find sweet spot for normal voltage 1200V-1250V and that's it. everything above is risky.

People write in signature frequency capable to boot PC or finish Cinebench, and other think that's their 24/7 stable clock.
Some new Intel processors are pushed so much and only Turbo Frequency is enough. Haswell-E need OC, serious, there is a lot of space but people go to far.

Why not reflesh BIOS with some older version, clear cmos and run everything on default first 1-2 week, later OC CPU on 4.0GHz on default voltage.

Vlada011 wrote:
People usually push processors to their end from start and later become unstable.
Ideal OC for Haswell-E is 4.2-4.3GHz maybe. Not 4.5-4.6GHz... that couldn't last long.
Better to run processors on stock speed first, than after 1-2 years little OC and before you change platform when CPU is few years old to drain last MHz from him.

People are too much occupied with benchmark results and Intel's sponsored reviews about improvement of every new generation.
In real life you can't see difference between I7-5960X on 4.3GHz or 4.5GHz, and sometimes voltage need for that is huge.
Find sweet spot for normal voltage 1200V-1250V and that's it. everything above is risky.

People write in signature frequency capable to boot PC or finish Cinebench, and other think that's their 24/7 stable clock.
Some new Intel processors are pushed so much and only Turbo Frequency is enough. Haswell-E need OC, serious, there is a lot of space but people go to far.

Why not reflesh BIOS with some older version, clear cmos and run everything on default first 1-2 week, later OC CPU on 4.0GHz on default voltage.


Hello Vlada011,

I have now received a new 5960x from intel on warranty. The old CPU started having problems at stock settings and was unusable/unstable. Anyways, I do think that the main issue was running the base clock at 125 MHz to load up the 3000 MHz 64GB DDR4. I will check if the new CPU can start the RAM at 3000 Mhz with a base clock of 100 MHz. My second hand 7900 x can use the same 3000 MHz modules at a base clock rate of 100 MHz. The advice I got on this forum 2 years ago was to keep the 5960x/RVE base clock at 125 MHz and I followed it, all was good till obviously the IMC could not handle the default 2133 MHz itself.

My 3930K overclocked was perfectly fine and ran 24/7 on a 100 MHz base clock. The lesson I have learnt is that, because the option of 125 MHz existed does not mean that the CPU can maintain that speed(even if it does Intel Burn test at full blast for a couple of months). I did note that the older 5960x OC settings were working fine and slowly degrading. Due to time constraints I did not investigate why that happened and anyways some quick voltage increases stabilized the CPU again, till no amount of voltage could stabilize it. The old 5960x lived 3 years all guns blazing, the warranty expires in May 2019 and I now I have a new 5960x.

So yes OC is bad, but then the typical life of my systems are 3 years anyways with newer builds of the software packages I use making performance worse with each passing year. Also, NO ONE should be recommended to keep base clock at 125 MHz, its just not expected to be used.

BTW, I will be using my RVE as a build machine and I will redoing ALL voltages as manual voltages from now on and try to check if the 3000 Mhz DDR4 works fine on a 100 MHz base clock - enough of adaptive & offset.

Cheers,
G.