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Cache multiplier voltages

Phillyflyer
Level 10
Have this board 100% prime95 8 hours stable @1.308 volts with a cache multiplier @ 28 x .....looking to increase cache anywhere from 34 - 37 x multi. Question is...what is the max safe cache voltage that I may have to apply?
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3 REPLIES 3

Silent_Scone
Super Moderator
Phillyflyer wrote:
Have this board 100% prime95 8 hours stable @1.308 volts with a cache multiplier @ 28 x .....looking to increase cache anywhere from 34 - 37 x multi. Question is...what is the max safe cache voltage that I may have to apply?




I would not use anymore than 1.2v, especially if planning on running Prime for a number of hours. This rail is the fast-track to degrading your CPU. Range is often limited so expect no higher than 36-37 typically, although all CPU are different.

If looking to stress test the cache only rather than running Prime, AIDA64 cache test isolated is good at catching cache instability, as well as HCI Memtest. At least that way you won't need to smash the CPU with as much current for a further 8 hours.
13900KS / 8000 CAS36 / ROG APEX Z790 / ROG TUF RTX 4090

Vlada011
Level 10
I use 1.2V Cache for 4.0GHz on i7-5820K, but I didn't test stability on lower voltage, there is good chance that keep more than need.
I tried first to use more voltage to prevent eventually BSOD or craches and 4.2GHz/4.0GHz 1.2/1.2V sound as OK to me and I left like that.

I think that ASUS increase default Cache Frequency on different BIOS version on X99 motherboards.
My default Cache Frequency was 2400MHz on 0603 BIOS, on last 3701 BIOS is 3000MHz. That would cause probably little better results on default settings of processor, slight difference in memory speed and maybe little CPU score difference on default.
There is no mistake, I knew that 2400MHz was default before and now after load default settings is 3000MHz.

If I replace cooling in near future I would not go more with Cache voltage, but I will test stabilty on 4.2GHz Cache and 4.5GHz Core.
For CPU Frequency I'm sure, for Cache I'm not.

Vlada011 wrote:
I use 1.2V Cache for 4.0GHz on i7-5820K, but I didn't test stability on lower voltage, there is good chance that keep more than need.
I tried first to use more voltage to prevent eventually BSOD or craches and 4.2GHz/4.0GHz 1.2/1.2V sound as OK to me and I left like that.

I think that ASUS increase default Cache Frequency on different BIOS version on X99 motherboards.
My default Cache Frequency was 2400MHz on 0603 BIOS, on last 3701 BIOS is 3000MHz. That would cause probably little better results on default settings of processor, slight difference in memory speed and maybe little CPU score difference on default.
There is no mistake, I knew that 2400MHz was default before and now after load default settings is 3000MHz.

If I replace cooling in near future I would not go more with Cache voltage, but I will test stabilty on 4.2GHz Cache and 4.5GHz Core.
For CPU Frequency I'm sure, for Cache I'm not.



Cache overclocking range is greater on Haswell-E than on Broadwell-E, but recommended voltage cap remains the same. Most of the supposed cases of fast degradation you read about on the platform are through neglectful use of Prime and/or too much cache voltage.
13900KS / 8000 CAS36 / ROG APEX Z790 / ROG TUF RTX 4090