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The reason for throttling of the GL-Series

Nevortic
Level 8
Hi guys, I've been thinking about this. I've analyzed the heatsink on this set of PCs, specifically the gl502vmk in my possession. I came to the conclusion that this pc develops well 180 Watts of which only 155/160 W are dissipated. The engineers who created the specifications of this pc were well thought of creating a coolant that can keep the gpu cool as it is the component that develops more watts (120 W on paper). In fact, as you can see on the various pictures that are posted around the fan and the disassembly mounted are slightly larger than those for the CPU. Surely the question arises spontaneously with regard to the gl702vmk, since it is bigger they could make a big heatsink and bigger fan for the cpu. The answer, which I think was the right one is "The laptop was first designed in gl502vm / vmk then through the various processes it has been adapted to a larger motherboard with a much higher construction facility and less time spent The production but in the porting made by the engineers did not consider the heatsink. The only thing that is thought is to add a third fan to the gpu (quite useless as the heatsink holds it well). " Now the only solution I've found to this problem is to add heatpipes to the cpu part to recover a few watts of dissipation but as the heat pipes do not have dissipation "fins" these are capable of dissipating 3 watts per pipe. So with 3 heatpipe we get to 9 watts and we'll be working to dissipate 169 watts. But that is not a simple matter of addition. So I'm designing a heatsink with a 3rd additional fan with "wings" capable of dissipating 8 watts and along with the fan should become about 11 watts of additional dissipation that could be added to the other 6 of the heatpipe that you can add. in the whole you get 177 watts that could put an end to the Throttoling. For now, with 3 heatpipes, the CPU does not go into throttoling and the temperatures are about 83 degrees. But I want more dissipation! As soon as I can get the designs on the subject I will make a video. Now I'm happy.
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Korth
Level 14
It's still a laptop. Not a desktop. It has limited power capacity and it has limited cooling capacity. All laptops do, no matter how much they cost.

It uses the biggest and best cooling the OEM could build within limits imposed by size, weight, and cost. Even if it's not up to the task of providing desktop-rated cooling to run desktop-rated parts at desktop-rated performance levels.

There's always room for improvement. And I hope for the best on your mod, it would be very interesting to see anything you devise which improves cooling performance.
But I think you will find it challenging to improve the near-optimal efficiency of the OEM's cooler.
"All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

[/Korth]

You just blew my mind. Fellow gl502vmk owner here, and I am highly interested in your video.

I am quite the novice in all of this, and as long as my game ran smoothly I had no complaints, and only recently, when trying to record my gameplay, did I encounter thermal throttling, and went on a quest to reduce heat.

Currently awaiting on delivery of an opolar cooler to install on the back side, as well as a spare bottom case, in which I plan to drill holes so there is better airflow for the two existing fans. I planned on using Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut liquid metal thermal paste, but, after some research and watching a few cases of it drying out, I am afraid of it hurting me in the long term, and will probably use Kryonaut instead. Maybe down the line will invest in some fujipoly pads, but it seems like such a waste of money, as they cost a lot and I don't even know yet how much I need or what sizes. So for the first time Kryonaut and arctic thermal pads will be used for my repasting. This project, first time for me, will be after I complete the drilling project.

Since I will already have a spare case in which I will be able to drill more holes for the new fan, and since the fins you spoke of seemed like an outside mod (might not be as simple as I imagined it), I am looking forward to watching your video, and hopefully I will have the skill and ability to implement your solution. I am quite afraid of liquid metal, and hopefully your solution will frighten me less. With experience in disassembly and regular repasting, and with the procurement of some pressure paper to test out my heatsink (and hopefully it being all even and nice), maybe I will be less afraid of the liquid metal.

Keep up the good work!

BTW, since you seem quite proficient in all this stuff, There is a simple mod that I read about on another thread, putting foil tape on the space between the fan and the heat sink, as the user noted there was some gap or something (shown in the pictures of the linked post). Another user commented later in the thread that it increased the heat his laptop produced. Do you think this mod is a good idea? And if so, what width foil tape do you think I should use? The readily available options for me to buy locally are 2inch, 1inch, and 0.5inch.

ValentinB wrote:
You just blew my mind. Fellow gl502vmk owner here, and I am highly interested in your video.

I am quite the novice in all of this, and as long as my game ran smoothly I had no complaints, and only recently, when trying to record my gameplay, did I encounter thermal throttling, and went on a quest to reduce heat.

Currently awaiting on delivery of an opolar cooler to install on the back side, as well as a spare bottom case, in which I plan to drill holes so there is better airflow for the two existing fans. I planned on using Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut liquid metal thermal paste, but, after some research and watching a few cases of it drying out, I am afraid of it hurting me in the long term, and will probably use Kryonaut instead. Maybe down the line will invest in some fujipoly pads, but it seems like such a waste of money, as they cost a lot and I don't even know yet how much I need or what sizes. So for the first time Kryonaut and arctic thermal pads will be used for my repasting. This project, first time for me, will be after I complete the drilling project.

Since I will already have a spare case in which I will be able to drill more holes for the new fan, and since the fins you spoke of seemed like an outside mod (might not be as simple as I imagined it), I am looking forward to watching your video, and hopefully I will have the skill and ability to implement your solution. I am quite afraid of liquid metal, and hopefully your solution will frighten me less. With experience in disassembly and regular repasting, and with the procurement of some pressure paper to test out my heatsink (and hopefully it being all even and nice), maybe I will be less afraid of the liquid metal.

Keep up the good work!

BTW, since you seem quite proficient in all this stuff, There is a simple mod that I read about on another thread, putting foil tape on the space between the fan and the heat sink, as the user noted there was some gap or something (shown in the pictures of the linked post). Another user commented later in the thread that it increased the heat his laptop produced. Do you think this mod is a good idea? And if so, what width foil tape do you think I should use? The readily available options for me to buy locally are 2inch, 1inch, and 0.5inch.


The aluminum tape on the gap between the fan and the heatsink has 2 benefits:
1) The noise drops considerably given the ease of doing so.
2) Increases throttoling threshold.
For example, without aluminum tape the PC goes into overheating in 2 minutes. with the tape the PC goes into overheating after 3:30 minutes.

Thank you for answering, I will then order some locally and try it, as I disassemble for the airflow modification. I have noticed that I go into thermal throttling after about 5 minutes of gameplay and recording with OBS, so prolonging it is already good. And hopefully the other things I try will benefit even more to the point of me being able to play and record enough time.

Looking forward to what you come up with.

Nothing would beat formal education in physics, or experience with electronics and heat dissipation, but since I don't have either, and I imagine a lot of others don't, I found this short 3 page document to help anybody get started on research.

It all seems very complicated, since I don't know all the terms to begin understanding the equations. But it sure gives some more terms to search and learn about. Hope this is helpful to anybody who desires to learn more, and doesn't want to start searching from scratch. I am going to attempt, as free time allows, some research on the matter (even though my superficial research pattern, like most internet searches, probably is 90% time wasting, but getting up to speed on physics would be, while more educating, quite a bit more time consuming).