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EveryOne With FAN SPEED GOING CRAZY

Tor_Spo
Level 8
Hi,
Please check your bios and OS for CPU/GPU RPM, if it's a crazy number like 7000? or -34550 or what ever!
then your problem is in THE HARDWARE the connector on the motherboard is very fragile and it has 4 PINS, very gentle pins inside it. those pins go inside the four holes of the fans connector and if even once the connector is seated in a wrong angle those pins will get BENT!
please check this before posting about crazy fans speeds.

ps. even new laptops can have this problem, employees @ asus factories aren't perfect and make mistakes too.
1,498 Views
25 REPLIES 25

FULLMETALJACKET
Level 11
That's what I've been saying since ever but no one ever listens. It's lost between all the users ranting about the issue. People just want a magical fix, like a patch or something that will fix everything on a single click.
Some users reported that unplugging the fans and plugging them back in would fix it for a few weeks. That's a dead giveaway. Should be an easy fix but people just want to complicate things...

FULLMETALJACKET7 wrote:
That's what I've been saying since ever but no one ever listens. It's lost between all the users ranting about the issue. People just want a magical fix, like a patch or something that will fix everything on a single click.
Some users reported that unplugging the fans and plugging them back in would fix it for a few weeks. That's a dead giveaway. Should be an easy fix but people just want to complicate things...


yeah 😄 they need to understand this! hopefully after this they will 🙂

FULLMETALJACKET7 wrote:
That's what I've been saying since ever but no one ever listens. It's lost between all the users ranting about the issue. People just want a magical fix, like a patch or something that will fix everything on a single click.
Some users reported that unplugging the fans and plugging them back in would fix it for a few weeks. That's a dead giveaway. Should be an easy fix but people just want to complicate things...


Are you kidding me? You're so quick to judge people for expecting their $2000 laptop to use connectors that're time tested to not come loose.
Nobody wants to complicate anything; the rants are because nobody signed up for a laptop they need to disassemble to remedy this type of issue. As someone whose has experience in hardware level repairs, I have no problem with it; but to not understand where the people who want to rant are coming from is just obtuse, especially when their only other option is to have the unit spend four-six weeks sitting in Asus's repair depot, to have random parts thrown at it, that likely won't actually remedy the issue. Also, some of these machines have components (like the touchpad) that have no quality driver available.

Example: The GL503, and GL504 both have an antiquated ELAN touchpad that kind of looks cool, but has no driver which remedies the fact it competes with ACPI interrupts and intermittently lags, and interprets movement at 1/10th sensitivity for minutes at a time. It had a similar issue in 2014, where a very similar looking touchpad (probably the same one) had a very similar issue (https://www.geek.com/apps/asus-says-100-cpu-utilization-is-required-for-smooth-scrolling-on-laptops-...). This issue is already remedied on the custom drivers implemented on Red Hat linux, but for some reason, Asus refuses to put the man hours into fixing it. My theory is they're relying on the demographic who owns these laptops to be perfectly fine with using a plug in mouse. That's not a hardware issue, it's just a headache for IT professionals who think they can fix it, and then find they literally cannot.

elang wrote:
Are you kidding me? You're so quick to judge people for expecting their $2000 laptop to use connectors that're time tested to not come loose.
Nobody wants to complicate anything; the rants are because nobody signed up for a laptop they need to disassemble to remedy this type of issue. As someone whose has experience in hardware level repairs, I have no problem with it; but to not understand where the people who want to rant are coming from is just obtuse, especially when their only other option is to have the unit spend four-six weeks sitting in Asus's repair depot, to have random parts thrown at it, that likely won't actually remedy the issue. Also, some of these machines have components (like the touchpad) that have no quality driver available.

Example: The GL503, and GL504 both have an antiquated ELAN touchpad that kind of looks cool, but has no driver which remedies the fact it competes with ACPI interrupts and intermittently lags, and interprets movement at 1/10th sensitivity for minutes at a time. It had a similar issue in 2014, where a very similar looking touchpad (probably the same one) had a very similar issue (https://www.geek.com/apps/asus-says-100-cpu-utilization-is-required-for-smooth-scrolling-on-laptops-...). This issue is already remedied on the custom drivers implemented on Red Hat linux, but for some reason, Asus refuses to put the man hours into fixing it. My theory is they're relying on the demographic who owns these laptops to be perfectly fine with using a plug in mouse. That's not a hardware issue, it's just a headache for IT professionals who think they can fix it, and then find they literally cannot.


I AM saying that if asus sells like 100000 of each model in each continent, then if even 0.1-1% slipped through the testing with bent pins and/or loose connectors and was marked "OK" and someone bought it. THESE THINGS happen and then you need to fix them or trust other person to fix them for you and then you PAY LOTS of money of that simple fix, One pin only 🙂 or one little tape holding the connector.. IMO everyone should be able to repair their electronics if they have two eyes and two working hands. so E-Z

ps. English is not my native language, sorry for every typo etc..

elang wrote:
Are you kidding me? You're so quick to judge people for expecting their $2000 laptop to use connectors that're time tested to not come loose.
Nobody wants to complicate anything; the rants are because nobody signed up for a laptop they need to disassemble to remedy this type of issue. As someone whose has experience in hardware level repairs, I have no problem with it; but to not understand where the people who want to rant are coming from is just obtuse, especially when their only other option is to have the unit spend four-six weeks sitting in Asus's repair depot, to have random parts thrown at it, that likely won't actually remedy the issue. Also, some of these machines have components (like the touchpad) that have no quality driver available.

Example: The GL503, and GL504 both have an antiquated ELAN touchpad that kind of looks cool, but has no driver which remedies the fact it competes with ACPI interrupts and intermittently lags, and interprets movement at 1/10th sensitivity for minutes at a time. It had a similar issue in 2014, where a very similar looking touchpad (probably the same one) had a very similar issue (https://www.geek.com/apps/asus-says-100-cpu-utilization-is-required-for-smooth-scrolling-on-laptops-...). This issue is already remedied on the custom drivers implemented on Red Hat linux, but for some reason, Asus refuses to put the man hours into fixing it. My theory is they're relying on the demographic who owns these laptops to be perfectly fine with using a plug in mouse. That's not a hardware issue, it's just a headache for IT professionals who think they can fix it, and then find they literally cannot.


I never said the connector would come loose. It's a bad connection, doesn't means the connector popped out of the socket. It happens all the time. You're saying that like everything that comes out of the factory is 100% tested and designed to perfection. I've been messing around with these contraptions since the mid 90s and I worked on a laptop repair shop for almost a decade. This is a common issue. If anything, it's just a bad fan.
People reported that they fixed that with tape, just by holding the wires in a certain position. Some reported that reseating the connector would fix it for a couple of weeks. It's a dead giveaway. Just a bad connection.

It's not a driver issue. It's not a software issue. It's not the BIOS going crazy. It's not a demonic possession. But hell, if you want to waste your time reformatting hundreds of times or waiting for a magical fix instead of simply opening up the back cover and trying to actually troubleshoot the issue, go right ahead and have fun while you're at it.

FULLMETALJACKET7 wrote:
I never said the connector would come loose. It's a bad connection, doesn't means the connector popped out of the socket. It happens all the time. You're saying that like everything that comes out of the factory is 100% tested and designed to perfection. I've been messing around with these contraptions since the mid 90s and I worked on a laptop repair shop for almost a decade. This is a common issue. If anything, it's just a bad fan.
People reported that they fixed that with tape, just by holding the wires in a certain position. Some reported that reseating the connector would fix it for a couple of weeks. It's a dead giveaway. Just a bad connection.

It's not a driver issue. It's not a software issue. It's not the BIOS going crazy. It's not a demonic possession. But hell, if you want to waste your time reformatting hundreds of times or waiting for a magical fix instead of simply opening up the back cover and trying to actually troubleshoot the issue, go right ahead and have fun while you're at it.


+1, wise words! connection IS the KEY! , make sure it's stable 🙂

Tor_Spo]
It's not a driver issue. It's not a software issue. It's not the BIOS going crazy. It's not a demonic possession. But hell, if you want to waste your time reformatting hundreds of times or waiting for a magical fix instead of simply opening up the back cover and trying to actually troubleshoot the issue, go right ahead and have fun while you're at it.

[QUOTE=FULLMETALJACKET7 wrote:

I never said the connector would come loose. It's a bad connection, doesn't means the connector popped out of the socket. It happens all the time. You're saying that like everything that comes out of the factory is 100% tested and designed to perfection. I've been messing around with these contraptions since the mid 90s and I worked on a laptop repair shop for almost a decade. This is a common issue. If anything, it's just a bad fan.
People reported that they fixed that with tape, just by holding the wires in a certain position. Some reported that reseating the connector would fix it for a couple of weeks. It's a dead giveaway. Just a bad connection.

It's not a driver issue. It's not a software issue. It's not the BIOS going crazy. It's not a demonic possession. But hell, if you want to waste your time reformatting hundreds of times or waiting for a magical fix instead of simply opening up the back cover and trying to actually troubleshoot the issue, go right ahead and have fun while you're at it.

The thermal issues are often hardware issues, like you described, but you also criticize people in a more general fashion for being upset about Asus's drivers, and you paint a picture that it's unreasonable to suspect drivers might ever cause these types of issues, and that's plain false. The drivers control the fan speed based on the thermal sensors, and respond to the thermal sensors accordingly.

If Asus finds the thermal sensors degrade in their accuracy, affecting 50% of all units in circulation, they could and probably have written software based patches to adjust the detection to the likely degradation of the sensors detection quality, or make the RPM changes less aggressive in certain temp ranges, because that will always be cheaper than a recall.

I think people are also dead-underestimating the number of users a lot of these issues affect, with some blind consumer-esque faith in the idea that if this issue affected everyone, then there would be a recall, or a magical fix.. but the sad reality is the issue affects many people who either deal with it, go through several RMAs thinking they got unlucky, or return the machine. Considering how many different models Asus has, they're advantaging the fact the % of customers who are vocal enough to write about issues with any given model is highly constrained, in comparison to a company like Apple. Asus can basically ignore small issues, or issues that're likely to only appear after a few weeks of use, so long as the product is good enough to withstand the two hours of basic testing Youtubers like Linus Tech Tips will do, they're good, people will trust the review, and if they have an issue with their product, they'll just assume they got unlucky. There won't be fluid and quick documentation of issues by all different users like there would be for a Macbook, and for Asus to basically take that into consideration with how they treat addressing hardware issues, it's sad.

https://topclassactions.com/lawsuit-settlements/consumer-products/electronics/906954-asus-laptop-cla... There weren't many people talking about this issue on the forums, there were some, but not enough to make it look like there was something worthy of a recall.

My point is, you're right it's a common issue, but it's not an issue that should be appearing in so many peoples machines after two weeks or a month of use. If it would cost Asus slightly more to improve the quality and reinforcement of their boards, and assembly, to prevent this "common issue", they don't necessarily have a tangible incentive to do so, because apologists like yourself will come and say it's just a bad connection, seen it for 20 years... Where should users draw the line? So many 5 star Amazon reviews on Asus's $1400+ models are revised mentioning "thermal issues after two weeks of normal use", or "everything was fine for a week but then XYZ, returned to Amazon". Just because the users can fix it

https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?93963-Horrible-ASUS-support

This same touchpad is included in 2018, and 2019 models (like the GL503,4) and the driver is outright faulty.
This is an example of the types of issues which makes people reluctant to trust software any time something goes wrong.

I've also worked as a technician, doing repairs on laptops for ~5 years.

Regardless, there're plenty of people who have posted saying their thermal issues were resolved after a Bios update, so your condescending nonsense about possession serve absolutely no purpose, because even if it is most often a hardware issue, the fact that there are instances where it was a firmware issue justifies the fact many people seek one out. Also, when I said loose connector, I didn't imagine you'd characterize a bad connection differently, but yes.. a loose connection, regardless of whether its solder, or a ribbon cable.

Like, I agree, if someone reseats (or tapes, or wiggles) a connector, finds their issue resolved for a couple weeks, then proceeds to hunt down a driver issue... that's pretty moronic, but you're casting way too wide of a net with your criticism considering there are issues, unfixed, in circulation, that are purely based on the available firmware for these expensive products.

If Asus had higher turnaround with their warranty service, maybe consumers, who have no obligation to know how to troubleshoot hardware issues, would feel more comfortable sending their units in for a fix instead of annoying you in this forum.

Unfortunately, having a product sit in service for 1/12th of it's warranty period, and being required to pay for outgoing shipping, is not status quo in consumer laptop industry for warranty service, yet Asus still markets to consumers.. who will ***** when they run into issues they didn't have with Apple, Dell, Lenovo, or dare I even say HP.

I leave you with this beautiful video.
https://youtu.be/Hrze-gx1T1E

elang wrote:
The thermal issues are often hardware issues, like you described, but you also criticize people in a more general fashion for being upset about Asus's drivers, and you paint a picture that it's unreasonable to suspect drivers might ever cause these types of issues, and that's plain false. The drivers control the fan speed based on the thermal sensors, and respond to the thermal sensors accordingly.

If Asus finds the thermal sensors degrade in their accuracy, affecting 50% of all units in circulation, they could and probably have written software based patches to adjust the detection to the likely degradation of the sensors detection quality, or make the RPM changes less aggressive in certain temp ranges, because that will always be cheaper than a recall.

I think people are also dead-underestimating the number of users a lot of these issues affect, with some blind consumer-esque faith in the idea that if this issue affected everyone, then there would be a recall, or a magical fix.. but the sad reality is the issue affects many people who either deal with it, go through several RMAs thinking they got unlucky, or return the machine. Considering how many different models Asus has, they're advantaging the fact the % of customers who are vocal enough to write about issues with any given model is highly constrained, in comparison to a company like Apple. Asus can basically ignore small issues, or issues that're likely to only appear after a few weeks of use, so long as the product is good enough to withstand the two hours of basic testing Youtubers like Linus Tech Tips will do, they're good, people will trust the review, and if they have an issue with their product, they'll just assume they got unlucky. There won't be fluid and quick documentation of issues by all different users like there would be for a Macbook, and for Asus to basically take that into consideration with how they treat addressing hardware issues, it's sad.

https://topclassactions.com/lawsuit-settlements/consumer-products/electronics/906954-asus-laptop-cla... There weren't many people talking about this issue on the forums, there were some, but not enough to make it look like there was something worthy of a recall.

My point is, you're right it's a common issue, but it's not an issue that should be appearing in so many peoples machines after two weeks or a month of use. If it would cost Asus slightly more to improve the quality and reinforcement of their boards, and assembly, to prevent this "common issue", they don't necessarily have a tangible incentive to do so, because apologists like yourself will come and say it's just a bad connection, seen it for 20 years... Where should users draw the line? So many 5 star Amazon reviews on Asus's $1400+ models are revised mentioning "thermal issues after two weeks of normal use", or "everything was fine for a week but then XYZ, returned to Amazon". Just because the users can fix it

https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?93963-Horrible-ASUS-support

This same touchpad is included in 2018, and 2019 models (like the GL503,4) and the driver is outright faulty.
This is an example of the types of issues which makes people reluctant to trust software any time something goes wrong.

I've also worked as a technician, doing repairs on laptops for ~5 years.

Regardless, there're plenty of people who have posted saying their thermal issues were resolved after a Bios update, so your condescending nonsense about possession serve absolutely no purpose, because even if it is most often a hardware issue, the fact that there are instances where it was a firmware issue justifies the fact many people seek one out. Also, when I said loose connector, I didn't imagine you'd characterize a bad connection differently, but yes.. a loose connection, regardless of whether its solder, or a ribbon cable.

Like, I agree, if someone reseats (or tapes, or wiggles) a connector, finds their issue resolved for a couple weeks, then proceeds to hunt down a driver issue... that's pretty moronic, but you're casting way too wide of a net with your criticism considering there are issues, unfixed, in circulation, that are purely based on the available firmware for these expensive products.

If Asus had higher turnaround with their warranty service, maybe consumers, who have no obligation to know how to troubleshoot hardware issues, would feel more comfortable sending their units in for a fix instead of annoying you in this forum.

Unfortunately, having a product sit in service for 1/12th of it's warranty period, and being required to pay for outgoing shipping, is not status quo in consumer laptop industry for warranty service, yet Asus still markets to consumers.. who will ***** when they run into issues they didn't have with Apple, Dell, Lenovo, or dare I even say HP.

I leave you with this beautiful video.
https://youtu.be/Hrze-gx1T1E


Keep it short and simple if you want anyone around here reading your replies. If you feel like writing a book on the subject, this is not the right place I'm afraid.
We are discussing the obnoxious fan speed issue. Nothing less, nothing more. Stop trying to change the subject and putting words in my mouth so you can try and make sense of your logic. If you want to talk about thermal issues, driver issues and whatnot, use the search function and find the proper thread to discuss it.

Read the other threads on the issue and you'll see what I'm talking about. There are also links to other forums where people also found the culprit.
It's a bad connection. Simple as that. Case closed.

My point is, you're right it's a common issue, but it's not an issue that should be appearing in so many peoples machines after two weeks or a month of use.


do you understand it's possibly a bad
BATCH! BATCH = those 2000 laptops that they made in one months time and those laptops are being sold around the world and the problems manifests because of the BAD BATCH
this bad patch has had BAD connectors that asus have bought from another company that makes those connectors / fans. (bad batch)

did this make this crystal clear for you now?

and if the connection IS BAD you need to go to your BIOS and see if the RPM THERE IS CHANGING, if it is 0 or crazy number like 547654
(cpu fan only can be seen there)
if the problem is with GPU fan you need to check it with software in your operating system.


please focus.