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ASUS PG279Q Backlight Fails In All But One Section. Fix Possible, or RMA?

Rhaegall
Level 7
The issue, as stated in the title, occurs roughly once a day. Sometimes multiple times in succession. The only temporary fix to turn the backlight on across the monitor is to turn off the monitor and back on, or something that refreshes the entire screen (such as updating graphics card). Even turning the monitor off and back on doesn't always work, as the issue would persist, so I'd have to do it multiple times before the backlight comes back on everywhere. Look at the pictures to see precisely what it looks like when the issue comes up.

Could there be a software bug causing this, or a possible fix, or is this definitely an RMA?

67691
67692
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5 REPLIES 5

Korth
Level 14
Fix is possible, but probably requires replacement parts specific to this monitor and certainly requires disassembly (which would void warranty).

It's likely caused by burnt out component(s) on the panel controller logic board, this would require component-level repair although replacing the entire module is usually far cheaper (and more reliable) than paying for the time/labour involved in diagnosing/replacing single parts. It's less likely caused by an internal power/signal ribbon(s) wiggling loose or a bad solder point or whatnot, this would be "quickly" diagnosed and repaired. The latter possibility is more likely if the monitor has been bumped or dropped. It's very, very easy for inexperienced people to inadvertently damage the components (and the delicate electronic linkages between them) during disassembly.
"All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

[/Korth]

Korth wrote:
Fix is possible, but probably requires replacement parts specific to this monitor and certainly requires disassembly (which would void warranty).

It's likely caused by burnt out component(s) on the panel controller logic board, this would require component-level repair although replacing the entire module is usually far cheaper (and more reliable) than paying for the time/labour involved in diagnosing/replacing single parts. It's less likely caused by an internal power/signal ribbon(s) wiggling loose or a bad solder point or whatnot, this would be "quickly" diagnosed and repaired. The latter possibility is more likely if the monitor has been bumped or dropped. It's very, very easy for inexperienced people to inadvertently damage the components (and the delicate electronic linkages between them) during disassembly.


I've repaired smartphones and other electronic devices before, sometimes involving a solder iron. Should I RMA this or attempt to fix it on my own, with the help of some online resource? Thanks!

Korth
Level 14
If you don't mind voiding ASUS warranty, once you've broken the seals you're on your own, RMA not an option.

I would first research online. Check out takeaparts/teardowns to see exactly which parts are used (and how they're put together). Check alibaba and ebay and google to see which (if any) of these are actually available and what they might cost. If you've got to deal with ASUS as the only possible source of parts then you might as well deal with ASUS for RMA. If you think it likely you need replacement part(s) which costs $$$ then you might as well RMA, lol.
"All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

[/Korth]

Korth
Level 14
Btw, have you tried the monitor on different GPU card or computer? With a different signal cable? It seems to be specific failure of the monitor itself, but always best to rule out common faults before cracking it open or sending it for replacement.
"All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

[/Korth]

kathampy
Level 7
There are no seals on the monitor. You can pop the panel out of the plastic frame with a pry tool and detach the buttons' ribbon cable. You can access the controller and G-SYNC module at this point. The panel itself is encased in a solid metal frame (the inner black border that you see on the front). It didn't look like it could be opened without breaking it inadvertently.