cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

2x PG279q not same colors

RuneSimonsen
Level 7
Hi

I have just bought two Asus PG279q. Setup next to each other, the colors are not 100% the same. I have tried to fiddle with the RGB controls, but I cannot make them look the same.

Is this expected? Or should I try buying a third one and setting it up next to the other two, and then keep the two that look alike the most and return one?

Or is buying a calibration device the only way to make two monitors have the same colors? And do you think that is even possible?

Or should I just ignore it. The monitors where quite expensive so maybe my expectations are just too high?

Thanks in advance for your insights.
4,093 Views
4 REPLIES 4

cljustin
Level 8
Most likely the 2 monitors you got are using two different panels.

cljustin wrote:
Most likely the 2 monitors you got are using two different panels.


Hi

I am not sure I understand. I bought two monitors of the exact same type to avoid this issue. And I paid the g-sync tax twice to get two monitors of the exact same type.

Korth
Level 14
Are your monitor production dates or "batches" (or whatever) declared anywhere on some sticker or something?

Try switching the cables, if the same colours are observed on the same monitors then the cables are fine, if differences are observed but on opposite monitors then the cables are the cause.

Try swapping your monitors and GPUs in all possible combinations. You might find one GPU card or output or one monitor input consistently produces different colours.

You can calibrate colour setting/templates in the monitor OSDs. And you can calibrate through Windows or NVIDIA/AMD software. Hopefully they'll be identical, but even if they aren't you should be able to establish colour symmetry.

I use colour "sample cards" as visual references - actual pieces of paper with a particular colour on them, obtained free from the paint department of my local Home Hardware store - a white, a grey, a black, a dark and a bright version for red and blue and green and yellow. I actually press these against the panel while adjusting colour settings to get a "perfect" (to my eyes) visual match for each of these colours - usually with normal or brightest room/background illumination - and I let the other 16.7M+ intermediate colour shades match themselves into the dominant primary settings, lol close enough. There might be a more official/professional way to do this, but my method works well enough for me.
"All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

[/Korth]

Korth wrote:
Are your monitor production dates or "batches" (or whatever) declared anywhere on some sticker or something?


There are some numbers on the stickers on the box but I am not sure what I am looking for.
Monitor 1:
P/N: 90LM0230-B01370
Check no: 0560
Product code: 9J.2W552.QQ1
Asus S/N: H3LMQS080352

Monitor 2:
P/N: 90LM0230-B01370
Check no: 3152
Product code: 9J.2W552.QQ1
Asus S/N: H3LMQS080339

Korth wrote:

Try switching the cables, if the same colours are observed on the same monitors then the cables are fine, if differences are observed but on opposite monitors then the cables are the cause.

Try swapping your monitors and GPUs in all possible combinations. You might find one GPU card or output or one monitor input consistently produces different colours.



No difference on switching cables or swapping monitors. I only have 1 GPU.

Korth wrote:

You can calibrate colour setting/templates in the monitor OSDs. And you can calibrate through Windows or NVIDIA/AMD software. Hopefully they'll be identical, but even if they aren't you should be able to establish colour symmetry.

I use colour "sample cards" as visual references - actual pieces of paper with a particular colour on them, obtained free from the paint department of my local Home Hardware store - a white, a grey, a black, a dark and a bright version for red and blue and green and yellow. I actually press these against the panel while adjusting colour settings to get a "perfect" (to my eyes) visual match for each of these colours - usually with normal or brightest room/background illumination - and I let the other 16.7M+ intermediate colour shades match themselves into the dominant primary settings, lol close enough. There might be a more official/professional way to do this, but my method works well enough for me.


I tried adjusting via contrast, brightness and the value for each color, but I cant make them look alike. Its a good idea about the cards, but tbh I dont think I am good enough to do it manually as I cannot make them match when the monitors stand right next to each other. Thanks for the idea though.