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So check this out... I think I know why we get throttled

Bojamijams
Level 7
From what I understand (and do correct me if wrong) the throttling that happens to us is due to inadequate power from the power supply (which is why it doesn't occur during Prime95 stress test because the graphics card isn't being utilized, but as soon as a game is fired up, then it happens)

Well Chastity posted this a few days ago in the Throttlestop sticky up above

http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?2329-ATTENTION-G73-53SW-Owners-CPU-Throttling-to-798mhz-and...

So if we exceed the 150watts, which we do under gaming (especially since a lot of like to overclock the GPU), then that would be why the chip starts throttling, yeah? And if we disable the throttle, we draw more then 150W and we could start getting freezes.

Not impressed by her solution (which basically means an extra $100 from us, without offering any trade-ins) but does this solve the WHY?
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dstrakele
Level 14
In http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?3322-Sandybridge-Throttle-Issue-and-Workaround, Chastity posts:

Sandybridge Throttle Issue and Workaround

When the system is under load, especially when the GPU and CPU max out, like say, when you are gaming, the BIOS/Chipset has a safety feature that will throttle down the system to prevent damage. Unfortunately I feel that the protection is triggered too easily, and many people will have a performance loss while playing their favorite games.

This will require a BIOS fix, but until then, there is a great workaround provided by Unclewebb. It's called ThrottleStop, and version 3 was updated to support Sandybridge systems. The culprit is the Bidirectional PROCHOT function, which handles this throttle feature. What you want to do is disable it, and it only needs to be configured once every boot-up, until a BIOS update exists. Also config it to Start Minimized if you are going to have it start at Windows boot.


I believe this is the more likely explanation, since CPU Throttling can be worked around with ThrottleStop using the stock power adapter.
G74SX-A1 - stock hardware - BIOS 202 - 2nd Monitor VISIO VF551XVT

Bojamijams
Level 7
Unfortunately it doesn't seem to be that 'is trigger easily' but rather that they shipped the unit with undersized power supply.

Which, unfortunately means that there probably will be no bios fix (how else can they explain why its taking them THIS long?) but rather the only fix is to spend ~$100 to fix their mistake.

I agree fully that ASUS cheaped out on the power supply for the G74: the following is my estimate of the minimum wattage that the G74 needs at "full throttle":

Core i7 2630QM Processor TDP (max)= 45W
NVIDIA 560M (max) = 75W
Chimei Innolux 17.3 LED (N173HGE-L11/L21) = 9.3W
Seagate Momentus 7200.4 500GB 7200RPM (x 2) = 3.1W each x 2 = 6.2W
Intel HM65 Chipset TDP = 3.9W

Total ~ 140W. This doesn't even account for the power required by the motherboard! In desktops you always bank on another 75W for just the motherboard (when you're buying a PSU for example), but since the G74's is smaller it'll probably be closer to half that, say 35W. So thats 175 watts right there, that you're trying to pull from a 150W supply. No wonder Chastity warns against it.

Whether a higher wattage PSU fixes the throttling issue is another thing. I personally doubt it, but this would be easy to test: anyone who has bought one of those 180W supplies could try and recreate the conditions for throttling (run Prime95 and furmark together for example) and see. I bet it still happens.
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G74SX-CST1-CBIL, i7 2630QM 2GHz
32GB DDR3 RAM @1333MHz
GTX560M 3GB DDR5 (192 bit)
17.3" LED 1920x1080
Sentelic TP, BIOS 203
Debian Linux Wheezy (Testing) Kernel 3.2, NVIDIA 295.40

dstrakele
Level 14
It does make you wonder if it would help out some of the folks whose USB 3.0 HDD's stop transfer in the middle of a backup or copying a large file....
G74SX-A1 - stock hardware - BIOS 202 - 2nd Monitor VISIO VF551XVT

dstrakele wrote:
It does make you wonder if it would help out some of the folks whose USB 3.0 HDD's stop transfer in the middle of a backup or copying a large file....


those HDDs you refer to are units that operate on a larger power draw than the standard USB spec.

For example, the WD External USB 1TB drive requires 5v 0.7a for proper usage, and the USB spec is 5v 0.5a. Many PC makers have ports supplying 1.0a, but on notebooks, where power consumption is a factor, many stick to USB spec. In comparison, the Seagate USB 1TB drive only requires the 0.5a, and has no issues.

On the G74SX, the USB 3 port can be enabled to supply 0.9a with the Quick Charge feature.

In conclusion, if your external HDD does not work on the power supplied by our USB ports, then it's out of spec. 🙂
[SIGPIC]Kicking Ass Since Today[/SIGPIC]

Chastity the Targus unit comes with 3 tips, L1 L2 and L3. Which is the one used for the G74? Or you bought an extra tip?

Chastity@ASUS wrote:
those HDDs you refer to are units that operate on a larger power draw than the standard USB spec.

For example, the WD External USB 1TB drive requires 5v 0.7a for proper usage, and the USB spec is 5v 0.5a. Many PC makers have ports supplying 1.0a, but on notebooks, where power consumption is a factor, many stick to USB spec. In comparison, the Seagate USB 1TB drive only requires the 0.5a, and has no issues.

On the G74SX, the USB 3 port can be enabled to supply 0.9a with the Quick Charge feature.

In conclusion, if your external HDD does not work on the power supplied by our USB ports, then it's out of spec. 🙂


Chastity - all this is only for those External USB drives which are taking power only from USB , or even those which have their own electric power connection to the mains ?

aviwil wrote:
Chastity - all this is only for those External USB drives which are taking power only from USB , or even those which have their own electric power connection to the mains ?


Chastity's comment refers only to drives that draw their power from USB2.0 (max 500ma @ 5V = 2.5W for this standard), and not drives that have their own separate power supply.
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G74SX-CST1-CBIL, i7 2630QM 2GHz
32GB DDR3 RAM @1333MHz
GTX560M 3GB DDR5 (192 bit)
17.3" LED 1920x1080
Sentelic TP, BIOS 203
Debian Linux Wheezy (Testing) Kernel 3.2, NVIDIA 295.40

http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?2329-ATTENTION-G73-53SW-Owners-CPU-Throttling-to-798mhz-and...
dkillone wrote:
Yes that very well could be part of the problem, but its already been proven that using a higher watt psu such as the 180w one, does not stop the throttling. I actually just got my 180w earlier this week and it definitely throttles no matter what unless I use throttlestop.

Now we just have to keep hoping that Asus finds the exact problem, and puts out a solution for us, since it seems not many care now, but this will only get worse as more demanding applications are found to cause throttling.
ASUS G74SX-TZ277D with 4x4GB Kingston