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Overclocking a G75VW with a GTX 660M

JoeMez
Level 7
I'm sure that across all the forums here I'd be able to find the information I want, but I want it all collected here, as well as get answers to other questions about overclocking my 660M.
1)First off, what constraints limit the level of overclocking that can be done? I understand heat buildup is one of, if not the major, issue- are there other results that need to be kept in check? Related to the heat buildup, what temperature ranges are safe to prevent damage to the 660M? Can anyone suggest a program or such to keep tabs of the gpu temperature over a long range of time, to help make track of the heat level? Or even cause an alarm if the temperature gets too high?

2)I played around with nVidia Inspector when I first looked into overclocking- for the memory clock it can alter, is that the GDDR3 (or whatever) that is the VRAM on the 660M gpu unit? Or is it the regular RAM for the system?

3)I noticed the nVidia Inspector allowed for clock shortcuts- could I just set one shortcut for stock 660M, use that for the games- or everyday use- I have that wouldn't benefit from overclocking- League of Legends, Portal 2, etc-,then switch to the increased clock for a more intensive game, like Skyrim or Battlefield 3? Would switching back and forth between the two clock levels cause concernable strain on the gpu? Even if the clock level I decide on is entirely safe for 24/7 use, I'd probably want to set the clock to the stock levels when not in use, just to be extra safe.

4)I think I'd feel safest clocking up to the level of a stock 670M- about how much would that be? If I were to use the nVidia Inspector again, would that be +75, +100, or what? and how much would be added to the memory clock?

5)Overclocked to the level of the 670M, would I need to worry much about the increased heat levels? I understand that the 660M is much cooler than the 670M, due to the 660M being newer architecture or something. I assume that the G75's cooling system is the same regardless of wither there's a 660M or 670M inside, so would an overclocked 660M, to the level of a stock 670M, produce enough heat to overcome the level of a stock 670M- overcoming the cooling abilities of my G75VW?

6)If I feel brave and exceed the level of the stock 670M, what is a 'maximum' clock that would be safe for the 660M? What clock levels are the absolute maximum it can handle while used in a game that really strains the gpu, like Battlefield 3, over several hours? Some of what I've read talks about altering the BIOS to exceed an increased clock of +135- I will in no way do that. I'll stay within the limits of the nVidia Inspector- or what ever program is suggested as preferable.

7)Really the only game I have that would be affected by overclocking is Battlefield 3, and I intend to get Skyrim soon. How much of an improvement would I get on Battlefield 3? Currently I get around 35-40 fps in smaller areas, dipping to 30 or even 25 in really big, detailed areas. Using Skyrim's HD texture pack, about how much improvement would be expected when the 660M is overclocked compared to a stock 660M? Playing either game over a period of several hours, would the heat buildup go to a level that might damage the gpu?

8)How much do I risk by overclocking? If the cooling system can compensate for the increase, over periods of several hours, do I need to be concerned in any way? I wouldn't leave the system at the increased clock 24/7, of course- after I'm done playing a game it'd be right back to stock levels. Or might it be that first time trying an unknown defect in my gpu causes it to shatter? What are the chances of damage, and in what ways? What will I need to watch for to prevent any damage, at any overclock level?

9)Finally, would the risk of overclocking be worth it? Would I get a significant upgrade in fps - something in the range of the same fps at noticeably higher quality, or +15 fps at the same level-, or will the increase be an insignificant 1-2 fps difference for the same graphic quality level?

I hope that the answers to all my questions leave me with an idea of the level of clock that can be turned on to play BF3 or Skyrim, for a few hours, without me needing to worry every few minutes about how the 660M is taking any increased strain, then set back to stock when I'm done playing with no decrease done to the gpu's integrity.

Thank you in advance to anyone who responds and helps out.
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63 REPLIES 63

bignazpwns
Level 11
JoeMez wrote:
I'm sure that across all the forums here I'd be able to find the information I want, but I want it all collected here, as well as get answers to other questions about overclocking my 660M.
1)First off, what constraints limit the level of overclocking that can be done? I understand heat buildup is one of, if not the major, issue- are there other results that need to be kept in check? Related to the heat buildup, what temperature ranges are safe to prevent damage to the 660M? Can anyone suggest a program or such to keep tabs of the gpu temperature over a long range of time, to help make track of the heat level? Or even cause an alarm if the temperature gets too high?

The GPU its self will shut down before it gets to hot. ITs been like that for years. All of them have temp cut offs like CPU's

2)I played around with nVidia Inspector when I first looked into overclocking- for the memory clock it can alter, is that the GDDR3 (or whatever) that is the VRAM on the 660M gpu unit? Or is it the regular RAM for the system?

That is the ram for your card.

3)I noticed the nVidia Inspector allowed for clock shortcuts- could I just set one shortcut for stock 660M, use that for the games- or everyday use- I have that wouldn't benefit from overclocking- League of Legends, Portal 2, etc-,then switch to the increased clock for a more intensive game, like Skyrim or Battlefield 3? Would switching back and forth between the two clock levels cause concernable strain on the gpu? Even if the clock level I decide on is entirely safe for 24/7 use, I'd probably want to set the clock to the stock levels when not in use, just to be extra safe.

Nvidia inspector you make a few desktop shortcuts and just click your oc to game and force the oc pstate or you just click your low power on and use that to save power. I ran a GTX 660m at 1300mhz on the core for 4 months solid heavy use with no problems.

4)I think I'd feel safest clocking up to the level of a stock 670M- about how much would that be? If I were to use the nVidia Inspector again, would that be +75, +100, or what? and how much would be added to the memory clock?

Dapends. But its going to be in the 800-900mhz range on the core.

5)Overclocked to the level of the 670M, would I need to worry much about the increased heat levels? I understand that the 660M is much cooler than the 670M, due to the 660M being newer architecture or something. I assume that the G75's cooling system is the same regardless of wither there's a 660M or 670M inside, so would an overclocked 660M, to the level of a stock 670M, produce enough heat to overcome the level of a stock 670M- overcoming the cooling abilities of my G75VW?

Kepler is the fonz of gpu's. Very cool so when i had my GTX 660m overclocked to 1,100mhz it ran cooler then my old fermi gtx 670m at stock clocks. My card at 1300 on the core was 5c hotter then a stock GTX 670m. But temps vary from system to system.

6)If I feel brave and exceed the level of the stock 670M, what is a 'maximum' clock that would be safe for the 660M? What clock levels are the absolute maximum it can handle while used in a game that really strains the gpu, like Battlefield 3, over several hours? Some of what I've read talks about altering the BIOS to exceed an increased clock of +135- I will in no way do that. I'll stay within the limits of the nVidia Inspector- or what ever program is suggested as preferable.

You will max out before you go higher enought to kill the card. You can push it to about 1300-1400 if your lucky without needing more voltage for the card. For most people they top out at 1,100-1,200 the higher ones are people who got lucky and got really good clocking cards.

7)Really the only game I have that would be affected by overclocking is Battlefield 3, and I intend to get Skyrim soon. How much of an improvement would I get on Battlefield 3? Currently I get around 35-40 fps in smaller areas, dipping to 30 or even 25 in really big, detailed areas. Using Skyrim's HD texture pack, about how much improvement would be expected when the 660M is overclocked compared to a stock 660M? Playing either game over a period of several hours, would the heat buildup go to a level that might damage the gpu?

This depends on drivers and what not. But overclocked with a good clock by the numbers you posted you can fix your lag problem.

8)How much do I risk by overclocking? If the cooling system can compensate for the increase, over periods of several hours, do I need to be concerned in any way? I wouldn't leave the system at the increased clock 24/7, of course- after I'm done playing a game it'd be right back to stock levels. Or might it be that first time trying an unknown defect in my gpu causes it to shatter? What are the chances of damage, and in what ways? What will I need to watch for to prevent any damage, at any overclock level?

High overclocks make heat. So you run the risk fo heat. It increase power draw on the system so you can damage your psu or mobo. I can it heavly overclocks and the system can power it pretty good. It can handle a oc'ed GTX 670mx thats pulling about 95w of power. Your GTX 660m wont ever go past about 75w unless you voltmod it and clock it to some crazy clock that i dont even think it will pull.

9)Finally, would the risk of overclocking be worth it? Would I get a significant upgrade in fps - something in the range of the same fps at noticeably higher quality, or +15 fps at the same level-, or will the increase be an insignificant 1-2 fps difference for the same graphic quality level?

To each his own. Safe overclocks there is no risk. This has a pretty big window for kepler. I mean some games you can gain 15-20fps very easy others dont respond as well to overclock but still show improvement.

I hope that the answers to all my questions leave me with an idea of the level of clock that can be turned on to play BF3 or Skyrim, for a few hours, without me needing to worry every few minutes about how the 660M is taking any increased strain, then set back to stock when I'm done playing with no decrease done to the gpu's integrity.

Thank you in advance to anyone who responds and helps out.



Added my advice in there.

But to oc higher then what is extremely safe and low for overclocking kepler you can do it with any problem. If you want higher you need to force pstates and with the new drivers you pretty much cant force them now. Some drivers even when i would force the pstarte and set it for a 900mhz clock ti would not go higher then something like 764mhz. So i had to use a older driver to get the higher clock i wanted.

Guido7142
Level 7
You can flash a custom bios like this one http://forum.techinferno.com/asus-gaming-notebook-forum/2538-%5Bg75vw%5D-modified-bios-vbios-higher-... and you will be able to overclock with no limits without the need of NVidia Inspector and with any driver. I use a stabe OC of 1280 MHz Core and +500 on memory (don't remember the base clock of the memory) and temps do not exceed the 68C, never got to 70 yet during Crysis 3. I did a repaste with MX-4 which helped A LOT and cleaned the heatsinks until they were shiny so most of that awesome temps are due to that. Flashing you bios can be risky but I'ts your call.
G75VW-BBK5 / i7 3610QM / 8GB RAM / OCZ Agility 3 SSD 120GB / GTX 660M

superman2k2
Level 9
Anywhere else to download the bios from. I tried but since I was a new member it wouldn't let me?

Thx for the help If its not too much trouble I could use a guide. I did read one on http://forum.notebookreview.com/gaming-software-graphics-cards/677169-nvidia-mobile-kepler-6xx-maste... But for the life of me I don't understand what Im reading. I will let you know if the files work the site is making me wait 120 minutes per file

Sorry for the waiting between downloads, did not know that. Right now I can't write you a guide but if you wait untill tomorrow or end of today I will post a little instruction line so you can flash this custom bios that unlocks the clocks of the GPU.
G75VW-BBK5 / i7 3610QM / 8GB RAM / OCZ Agility 3 SSD 120GB / GTX 660M

Thank You that would be great f you can please include the setting to overclock the 660m to a 670m and once again Thank you

Hi DONT FLASH BIOS if you can avoid it, you don't need to flash anything. For 660M download the latest Beta 320.00+ driver from Nvidia. Install. Download latest NvidiaInspector.

Use the following .bat files, use different ones for desired settings:

Eg. for 1200mhz core 3000mhz mem (maximum for myself, lower is usually more stable):

nvidiaInspector.exe -setBaseClockOffset:0,0,135 -setMemoryClockOffset:0,0,0 -setVoltageOffset:0,0,0 -setGpuClock:0,2,1200 -setMemoryClock:0,2,3000 -forcepstate:0,0

To RESET to stock:

nvidiaInspector.exe -setVoltageOffset:0,0,0 -setGpuClock:0,2,835 -setMemoryClock:0,2,2500 -forcepstate:0,16

The thing is the following.

Flashing a bios is always risky, if you could avoid flashing it, that would be the best choice. Now, with the official 223 bios we all know that without NVidia Inspector you could OC the GPU (with tools like MSI Afterburner or EVGA Precision X, etc) but just up to +135MHz (total of 1085MHz on the core) and the memory I don't remember if it has a limit with stock bios. Then it came up a method using NVidia Inspector that forced certain P states on the GPU and let us go past the +135 barrier. P states are the names that it is used to describe certain clock behaviors, some lock the clock at max frequency, others just ramp up the clock when needed and drop it don when not needed, and there are some other P states. The thing got tricky when some time ago, nVidia released its 310 drivers and the NVidia Inspector method suddenly stopped working and we were once again unable to go past the +135 barrier. At that time is where everyone went on flashing this custom bios that unlock the core and memory clock directly in the bios and let us go as far as we want without the need of Inspector, just with Precision or any other OCing tool.

Apparently, as from what I see with SrMojuze's post, now with drivers 320 you can do the Inspector tick once again, thus eliminating the need to flash a custom bios.

If you are interested in knowing how to do the Inspector trick after you read my post and SrMojuze's post, let me know and I will give you some guidelines about how to do it.

Hope it helps.

(Just as a temptation, I have my core at 1280 stable, without exceeding the 70C, I repasted with MX-4. Just set the OC when need it for gaming, if doing non GPU intensive tasks I have it on stock clocks and everything stays under 40)
G75VW-BBK5 / i7 3610QM / 8GB RAM / OCZ Agility 3 SSD 120GB / GTX 660M