cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

How to clean G750 internal fan

HeiwaNoKaze
Level 7
As title, how to clean the fan inside while now open the bottom only see ram and others, now fan not shown, is it need to open all out then can clean?
679 Views
16 REPLIES 16

BobbyCannon
Level 9
You will need to take the keyboard plate off. I was thinking the same thing. This is based on what I saw when I replace the internal RAM. You can access the fan with the keyboard plate off. It's not near as easy as the G75 model.

There is some instructions and pictures on my other thread about replacing the internal RAM.

Flea0
Level 10
does removing the keyboard plate require careful removal of zero-force insertion ribbons for mouse and keyboard? My old HP's ribbons lasted about 3 removals before disintegrating and making the touchpad useless 😕
ASUS G750JX -- i7-4700 - 16GB - 128GB 840 PRO SSD + 1TB HDD - Nvidia GTX 770M - 120Hz 3D glossy display

xartonis
Level 7
This is probably a useful Link for those who are trying to gain access to the heatsink or reapplying thermal paste of the CPU/GPU.

http://forum.notebookreview.com/asus-gaming-notebook-forum/726296-asus-g750-disassembly.html

wrangler
Level 7
I've seen that page. I don't find it helpful. What it shows is really "disassembled", not "disassembly".

xartonis
Level 7
Well you are probably right wrangler.
That page just shows how easy it is to maintain G750, i.e. cleaning dust or applying new thermal paste onto the CPU/GPU.
When purchasing a ROG laptop the heat problem will inevitably occur after some years. Therefore, I guess it would be desirable for every end user to be able to use an expensive laptop as long as possible.
The fact that Asus did not put that into consideration surprizes me if you consider how much you have to put on the table for G750.

Here is just an example how Sager did, although the design is not as good as ROG. I just hope the next ROG laptop series will be easier to maintain.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnUThlPz3iE ( check 29:40 )

wrangler
Level 7
With the disassembled G750, I can see the parts, but I really didn't get a feel for how much time and trouble is involved taking the machine apart to do the maintenance you mentioned.

I do agree that ASUS should expect the users in the market niche targeted by ROG machines to desire easier and better access to components.

Personally, i'd like easy access to the WiFi card and all the RAM slots, just for starters. Hearing "you may void your warranty" when changing these certainly bolsters the argument that the design doesn't suit the users, when it comes to these items. And there are valid reasons for changing these immediately after purchase. Some of the wireless cards are not 802.11ac, and I believe that I've seen some RAM configurations that won't allow dual-channel, e.g., 1 8gig and 1 4gig module.

wrangler wrote:
Personally, i'd like easy access to the WiFi card and all the RAM slots, just for starters. Hearing "you may void your warranty" when changing these certainly bolsters the argument that the design doesn't suit the users, when it comes to these items. And there are valid reasons for changing these immediately after purchase. Some of the wireless cards are not 802.11ac, and I believe that I've seen some RAM configurations that won't allow dual-channel, e.g., 1 8gig and 1 4gig module.


The WiFi and 2 internal RAM slots aren't that hard to get to - unscrew all screws at the bottom of the laptop, including the ones hidden under the harddrive panel and battery. This will allow you to remove the plastic panel covering the jutting-out behind the screen (carefully disconnect the speaker wires). Once you do this, you can see the hinges. You can then lift up the whole keyboard panel (it's one flush piece) starting at the back, by the screen hinge/corner screw. Once it pops (quite easy), you can just use your nails or a soft plastic tool to make it pop towards the front of the laptop. Once it's popped on all sides, you can lift it. Carefully disconnect the 2 ribbon cables and you can see the motherboard. You can now change your WiFi card and the 2 RAM modules, if desired.

If you want to clean fans fully and repaste, then you'll need to continue unscrewing - a few addon boards (sound, power, usb) - VERY carefully disconnect the VGA cable, and of course the several screws holding the mobo itself. You can then take it out and flip it over, thus exposing the heatsinks/fans completely. From here on it's a standard "unscrew heatsink, clean, apply paste, reattach". Put everything back together.

As for the dual channel issue, you're making it out to be worse that it is. 1x8 + 1x4 means 8 gigs will work in dual channel, and 4 gigs in single channel. However, unless I'm mistaken, factory-installed RAM is put in the hard-to-reach internal slots, which are slot 2 and 4. This means you can put in matching 4gb + 8gb in the bottom 1 and 3 slots, and end up with 24 gigs of dual-channel RAM. You can use CPU-Z to see which slot has what module.

Is it harder than Clevos? Sure, it is. Is it MUCH MUCH quieter than Clevos? Yes, it is. I'll take that tradeoff any day. Warranty is also a concern, of course. Use Asus's repair centres while in warranty, then once you're no longer covered you can do it yourself. It's not as if you reallyneed to repaste in the first couple of years.

villiansv wrote:

Is it harder than Clevos? Sure, it is. Is it MUCH MUCH quieter than Clevos? Yes, it is. I'll take that tradeoff any day. Warranty is also a concern, of course. Use Asus's repair centres while in warranty, then once you're no longer covered you can do it yourself. It's not as if you reallyneed to repaste in the first couple of years.


Agree.
The cooling of G970 is definitely better and more quiet. well nothing is perfect.

rajeshtechfreak wrote:
Is there any Service Support from private companies or Local computer Store where repasting thermal can be done ?
Instead of doing it ourselves ?


As villansv has already mentioned. You should be fine in the first 2 years (?). You will notice fast enough when your laptop needs to be cleaned (coretemp / AIDA). By that time you will often find a detailed guide on the internet how to take your laptop apart. It looks more scary than it is. In the end you will only get more experience if you do it yourself ( speaking form my own experience ).

xartonis
Level 7
Resolving the heating problem will be the biggest challenge in the long run. After some years (2-3? depending on the insensitivity of the use of the laptop) the thermal paste will become hard as stone, thus efficient cooling of CPU/GPU will be no longer given which means the users will have to 1. buy a new laptop, or 2. clean / apply new thermal paste onto CPU/GPU by themselves because the warranty will already be expired.

Looking at current G750 design you will have to take apart the whole laptop to be able to gain access to the heatsink/heatpipes which requires a long time and a little bit of knowledge and research. That is why I wish Asus would have done that better....

Looking at Sager's case you just have to open the bottom cover and the heatsink/heatpipes are already in front of you which is A LOT easier to extend the life of a pricey laptop.

A small video how it often looks like inside of the heatsink after few years of use.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wgrm9RfYpsQ

just my 2 cents