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g751jt, big performance hit on battery power, is it just me?

XOIIO
Level 7
Another quick question, and I want to check to see if other people have this or if I just missed a setting for CPU speed adjustment or something in the power options. When playing a game such as GTA5, I can usually get 40-50fps or so on quite high settings, with the plug in, with the plug out however that drops all the way down to 20. Now I know that having a plug in is the best option, you have a better supply of current to the laptop, but it does make it hard to demonstrate how good a computer is to people you know if it takes a big performance hit on battery power. I figured FPS would decrease some, but by over half on a gaming laptop? It just seems to me that maybe I am missing something. That or perhaps the battery just can't supply as much current without heating up too much so the CPU speed is throttled. I'm going to take a peek in the BIOS to see if I missed something there perhaps.
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15 REPLIES 15

joshindaphils
Level 11
Only so much current can be drawn from the battery w/o damaging the battery or even causing a fire. A line must be drawn somewhere. Would you rather the battery only last 30-40 cycles, but you get better gaming performance while on battery?

All gaming laptops have this same limitation. To put this in perspective, and for the sake of argument we assume that pulling ~80% of the power adapter rating though battery wasn't an issue... Playing a game with an averaging a 180w power draw during play, your battery would last less than 30 minutes. I hope this illustrates the problem a little better.

joshindaphils wrote:
Only so much current can be drawn from the battery w/o damaging the battery or even causing a fire. A line must be drawn somewhere. Would you rather the battery only last 30-40 cycles, but you get better gaming performance while on battery?

All gaming laptops have this same limitation. To put this in perspective, and for the sake of argument we assume that pulling ~80% of the power adapter rating though battery wasn't an issue... Playing a game with an averaging a 180w power draw during play, your battery would last less than 30 minutes. I hope this illustrates the problem a little better.


Speaking of lies and misinformation. Spoken like someone who knows nothing about draw and load.

Asoryu wrote:
Speaking of lies and misinformation. Spoken like someone who knows nothing about draw and load.


Prey tell? What exactly is a lie or misinformation, or do you just have an accusation and an ad hominem attack with nothing to back it?

I stand by my statement and my hypothetical example.

I think you will be hard pressed to discredit my statements with anything more that what you have provided.

joshindaphils wrote:
Prey tell? What exactly is a lie or misinformation, or do you just have an accusation and an ad hominem attack with nothing to back it?

I stand by my statement and my hypothetical example.

I think you will be hard pressed to discredit my statements with anything more that what you have provided.


180w load at 19.5v is 9.2 amps. Even the crappiest Chinese LiPo batteries I have can sustain an 10 amp draw meaning that the only limitations would be in the laptops ability to pull 10 amps off the charging system. So that would mean the laptop power control would be the limiting factor and if that were the case then the laptop could never pull enough amps to fully power the system battery or not.

There is absolutely zero reason you shouldn't be able to run your laptop at full power on battery other than the limitations of how long you could.

So my question for you is where are you getting the information that laptop batteries aren't capable of the supposed draw you have suggested?

Asoryu wrote:
180w load at 19.5v is 9.2 amps. Even the crappiest Chinese LiPo batteries I have can sustain an 10 amp draw meaning that the only limitations would be in the laptops ability to pull 10 amps off the charging system. So that would mean the laptop power control would be the limiting factor and if that were the case then the laptop could never pull enough amps to fully power the system battery or not.

There is absolutely zero reason you shouldn't be able to run your laptop at full power on battery other than the limitations of how long you could.

So my question for you is where are you getting the information that laptop batteries aren't capable of the supposed draw you have suggested?


I am not in the habit of talking out of my rear on things I have little or no knowledge on. While I am in error on occasion, after all nobody is perfect. I do make an effort to correct my errors when discovered. In addition I most certainly don't lie. I do not appreciate the insinuations of both of these things please do post an apology for your libel.

All batteries have different discharge rates. Several factors determine what this is, and there are certainly trade-offs. Utilizing the higher C rating (discharge rate) of a battery comes at a cost of fewer duty cycles and more heat generation. There are a myriad of things wrong with your assumptions, however I will stop here, as it is easy to see why you would not want a hot battery inside of your laptop, and why you would want the battery to last as long as possible.

Here is a good resource for more on batteries: http://batteryuniversity.com/

You can't make an apples to apples comparison against high C Li-Pos and Li-ions inside of laptops they have completely different intended uses. As well the limitation of power delivered to the laptop not need to be restricted by the battery at all. In the case of laptops they are generally design limitations to prevent a host of other issues like heat and low run time.

The G751 is restricted to 100w, I've seen this in a handful of place here is yet another one I found by searching 'g751 100w' http://www.ultrabookreview.com/5919-asus-g751jy-review/.

I have not stated that the battery cannot deliver the power needed to run g751 at full boar, don't put words in my mouth. I stated that too much current can cause damage to the batter, i.e. shortening the life due to heat stress... remember this current is generating heat inside of the battery then powering components generating even more heat... now admittedly the catching fire part is a bit of hyperbole though it most certainly can happen and was used to further illustrate reasons why one would want to limit the draw from a battery. Regardless the statements stand as factual.

I don't happen to know the particulars of the battery in the g751, nor have I claimed to, it is a rather moot issue due to the power restrictions in place.

joshindaphils wrote:
I am not in the habit of talking out of my rear on things I have little or no knowledge on. While I am in error on occasion, after all nobody is perfect. I do make an effort to correct my errors when discovered. In addition I most certainly don't lie. I do not appreciate the insinuations of both of these things please do post an apology for your libel.

All batteries have different discharge rates. Several factors determine what this is, and there are certainly trade-offs. Utilizing the higher C rating (discharge rate) of a battery comes at a cost of fewer duty cycles and more heat generation. There are a myriad of things wrong with your assumptions, however I will stop here, as it is easy to see why you would not want a hot battery inside of your laptop, and why you would want the battery to last as long as possible.

Here is a good resource for more on batteries: http://batteryuniversity.com/

You can't make an apples to apples comparison against high C Li-Pos and Li-ions inside of laptops they have completely different intended uses. As well the limitation of power delivered to the laptop not need to be restricted by the battery at all. In the case of laptops they are generally design limitations to prevent a host of other issues like heat and low run time.

The G751 is restricted to 100w, I've seen this in a handful of place here is yet another one I found by searching 'g751 100w' http://www.ultrabookreview.com/5919-asus-g751jy-review/.

I have not stated that the battery cannot deliver the power needed to run g751 at full boar, don't put words in my mouth. I stated that too much current can cause damage to the batter, i.e. shortening the life due to heat stress... remember this current is generating heat inside of the battery then powering components generating even more heat... now admittedly the catching fire part is a bit of hyperbole though it most certainly can happen and was used to further illustrate reasons why one would want to limit the draw from a battery. Regardless the statements stand as factual.

I don't happen to know the particulars of the battery in the g751, nor have I claimed to, it is a rather moot issue due to the power restrictions in place.


You stated that all gaming laptops suffer from this restriction which is untrue and the logic you used to support it is also unsound at best. My opinion is that this is more than likely a restriction placed on them so they don't wear out the built in battery too fast since you can't replace it.

An honest statement would have been that ASUS limits the power output of these units to 100 watts on battery.

yfbcjw
Level 7
I signed up to the forums specifically for this issue. I have yet to try playing any games on just the battery, but once I pull the AC plug my laptop becomes sluggish and slow in general use. Actually.. it's unbearable. Just upgraded from a 5 year old Dell and on that never had such an issue as this on battery. Loading apps take longer, just highlighting a button (such as an X to close an app) takes a few seconds to animate the highlight. I have switched to the high performance mode and disabled the intel CPPC setting, set processor state to 100% and neither of these help make the laptop usable. Any ideas?

yfbcjw wrote:
I signed up to the forums specifically for this issue. I have yet to try playing any games on just the battery, but once I pull the AC plug my laptop becomes sluggish and slow in general use. Actually.. it's unbearable. Just upgraded from a 5 year old Dell and on that never had such an issue as this on battery. Loading apps take longer, just highlighting a button (such as an X to close an app) takes a few seconds to animate the highlight. I have switched to the high performance mode and disabled the intel CPPC setting, set processor state to 100% and neither of these help make the laptop usable. Any ideas?


Definitely not normal, that is an extraordinary slowdown... other than that I have no advice to remedy your situation. General usage like you are describing (close button transition) would be very snappy regardless of powerplan settings.

Back to X0110 do insure you are on the highest power plan, and battery boost is set to the FPS you prefer... this only help on games easier to run where FPS is not an issue on batter power and helps reduce power draw further. 30 FPS is the minimum setting though.

edix12345
Level 7
Check the power plan because it has different options for when its plugged and unplugged.
it has nothing to do with the current going in when its plugged, trust me.