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does ASUS plan to sell laptops with delided CPUs

monroe
Level 7
does ASUS plan to sell laptops with delided CPUs ?
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20 REPLIES 20

Darnassus wrote:
Monroe I'm confused.. what exactly are you trying to ask..?

There's Laptop CPU's that're just the chip with no IHS, so the die is directly pasted to the cooler. Laptops aren't usually expected to be opened and repasted.

There's Desktop CPU's that have the IHS, which spreads the surface area of the CPU, while also allowing better pressure distribution for larger sinks and mounting blocks.

You don't put a Desktop CPU into a Laptop. Too much heat to disperse, more power hungry. No point.

The CPU's we have, the 6700's and above can be overclocked up to 8GHz, so if you want to match a desktop clockrate of 4GHz well, be my guest, though you'll not last very long. ;d

I didn't actually realise you were the one who also posted the "DOES ASUS PLAN TO RELEASE LAPTOPS WITH INTEL DESKTOP CPUS AND DESKTOP NVIDIA GPUS?" thread, and the answer would most likely be no for CPUs not for a long time at least.

The GPU might happen. I believe the ROG Chimera has a Desktop 1080 GPU inside of it.



thanks for replying. just a side question: i think that the GPUs (desktop and mobiles) used in laptops are not delided. so, my questions is: why they are not delided?

ST9752
Level 10
If Intel or AMD ship the chips with a different die cover then it's still a normal usage of the product. No big company like ASUS, etc is modifying the chips. That's the point.

ST9752
Level 10
Apparently Intel did a lousy job bonding their Heat Spreader on certain CPU's which led to a number of people shaving of their IHS to get better heat transfer. Outside of a case like this there is no reason to mod a chip. The chips are designed to transfer their TDP from the die through the IHS to an appropriately sized heat sink. If the heat sink is actually capable of sinking that much energy than no delidding should ever be necessary and it wouldn't be helpful anyhow.

xeromist
Moderator
Several reasons. For one, the components under the IHS are delicate. When you are making a product for end users to assemble it needs to be somewhat idiot proof. Second, heat sink quality varies. If the IHS does a reasonable job of spreading the heat then it's OK if your heat sink is making sub optimal contact as long as it makes enough to transfer heat. If you put a crappy heat sink directly onto the die it could make poor contact and cranking it down to make good contact could crack the die.
A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. On my desk, I have a work station…

xeromist wrote:
Several reasons. For one, the components under the IHS are delicate. When you are making a product for end users to assemble it needs to be somewhat idiot proof. Second, heat sink quality varies. If the IHS does a reasonable job of spreading the heat then it's OK if your heat sink is making sub optimal contact as long as it makes enough to transfer heat. If you put a crappy heat sink directly onto the die it could make poor contact and cranking it down to make good contact could crack the die.


well, the CPU electrical circuitry is also as complicates as the GPU's. so, they are in the same boat, but desktop CPUs are delided.

xeromist
Moderator
Again, because they are not installed by end users. They are preinstalled by the hardware vendor and the heat sink is designed to work with the chip being installed. Most customers will never see the naked CPU/GPU unless they are voiding a warranty. For chips that are sold direct to the public and may be used with a variety of coolers they are protected by an IHS.
A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. On my desk, I have a work station…

xeromist wrote:
Again, because they are not installed by end users. They are preinstalled by the hardware vendor and the heat sink is designed to work with the chip being installed. Most customers will never see the naked CPU/GPU unless they are voiding a warranty. For chips that are sold direct to the public and may be used with a variety of coolers they are protected by an IHS.


ok,
if ("chips that are sold direct to the public and may be used with a variety of coolers they are protected by an IHS")
then have u seen smb buying a mobile GPU chip and putting some other cooler beside that one that comes with the laptop? if the mobile CPU comes delided then it makes sense the mobile GPU also to come delided.

xeromist
Moderator
The last laptop GPU I had didn't have an IHS either. I'm not sure which GPU you are talking about but it's possible that it uses the same package as a desktop GPU and it was economical to keep them the same.

Anyway, you seem to be greatly overestimating the value of a naked die. The reason you see naked dies in laptops isn't for performance, it's just cheaper. The temperature difference between an IHS and a naked die is pretty minor and the performance potential is relatively small. Everything comes down to cost. Having an IHS protects the manufacturer from RMA claims and encourages people to build systems. Not having an IHS saves money in situations where it isn't as necessary.
A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. On my desk, I have a work station…

Darnassus
Status Under Review
Most GPUs now are never manufactured (GTX 600 and beyond, unless rare circumstances) with an IHS, they're all bare to the die and mounted directly onto a sink.

The only good reason a GPU would have an IHS on it is if it's inside of a gaming console.

monroe
Level 7
@xeromist and @Darnassus thank you very much for replying me. i have definitively learned new things with you which i appreciate very much.