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ASUS Ally internal storage: upgradeable?

Melina
Level 10

Hi,

Quick question re: the Ally: is it possible to open it up and replace the existing, tiny 512GB of internal storage with, say, a Samsung 980 Pro NVme card? Seems like it should be doable, or is it soldered in or something?

These days 512GB for a games system is inadequate. I know there's the MicroSD slot, but am not sure PC games will play well off the speeds you can get with those?

Thanks,

Steven

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1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

chloe_gamster
Level 7

Hi,

The internal NVMe drive is user replaceable (whether this voids your warranty has not been officially clarified yet by ASUS, however ideally it should be fine). The existing drive is a 2230 (22mm wide, 30mm long) drive, whereas the Samsung 980 Pro is a 2280 (80mm long), so it won't fit inside the Ally.

You'd need to find a PCIe Gen 4 2230 drive, which is a little rarer since the 2280 seems to be the standard for most PCs. Reputable brands I've seen are Corsair (MP600 Mini), Sabrent Rocket and Micron, although they all seem to be about the 4000-4500 read/write speeds, instead of the 5000-7000 for the Samsung 980 Pro and similar high-end 2280s. The drive in my PC is only rated for speeds of about 4200-4900 and games play just fine, so practically speaking I don't think the speed will noticeably impact performance.

ROG Global just did a livestream on their YouTube channel where they did a teardown on the Ally while answering some questions if that might interest you.

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2 REPLIES 2

chloe_gamster
Level 7

Hi,

The internal NVMe drive is user replaceable (whether this voids your warranty has not been officially clarified yet by ASUS, however ideally it should be fine). The existing drive is a 2230 (22mm wide, 30mm long) drive, whereas the Samsung 980 Pro is a 2280 (80mm long), so it won't fit inside the Ally.

You'd need to find a PCIe Gen 4 2230 drive, which is a little rarer since the 2280 seems to be the standard for most PCs. Reputable brands I've seen are Corsair (MP600 Mini), Sabrent Rocket and Micron, although they all seem to be about the 4000-4500 read/write speeds, instead of the 5000-7000 for the Samsung 980 Pro and similar high-end 2280s. The drive in my PC is only rated for speeds of about 4200-4900 and games play just fine, so practically speaking I don't think the speed will noticeably impact performance.

ROG Global just did a livestream on their YouTube channel where they did a teardown on the Ally while answering some questions if that might interest you.

Thanks for the reply. Doesn't look too hard to open, though I'll probably wait to do so on mine until after the warranty period. Just extra cautious on this stuff.

Looks like the Sabrent Rocket 2230 1TB is the optimal add-in/replacement at the moment, reasonable price. I'll be keeping an eye out for a 2TB variant, hopefully that's not electronically impossible (size/heat/reliability, as usual!).

Maybe even better: I see the ROG Strix Arion external NVMe 2280 case on the way. Could get that to offload/onload games to the Ally, though a MicroSD card will probably be sufficient for that.

Seems like this is more of a "have your Library, download one or two games at a time and play, then delete and download others when you decide to play them" machine. Not a problem, at all, just a different way of doing things.

With things like MWII and MSFS2020 pushing to 200-500GB total these days for the one game, you can see where this starts to be something to think about. I suspect in the future that will be more of a norm. I also expect new variants of the Ally to arrive to support this rapidly evolving industry. That does not bother me, either. This is the future platform for all gaming, perhaps computing, I think.