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Rampage VI Extreme (LGA2066, Intel X299) - info, experience, BIOSes etc.

FlanK3r
Level 13
Intel public HEDT CPus with platfrom Intel X299 at Computex 2017. The CPU reviews are still under embargo for short time ,-). But some informations are officially out and OK with Intels NDA.

Intel X299 is really highend chipset for enthusiast CPUs. This year very powerfull, much more than anyone hoped. Because this year is AMD also very strong at CPU side (Announced not only 8 cores with SMT, but also up to 16C with SMT for AMD X399), Intel will launch step by step 6C/12T, 8C/16T, 10C/20T....Everything?:) Nooo, continue it with 12C/24T, 14C/28T, 16C/32T and new flagship 18C/36T !!!


New LGA2066 will be new one after 2011v3...Great value is, you can put in two generation CPUs. More info bellow.
1) Kabylake-X with new CPUs Core i5 X a Core i7 X. Those CPUs are KabyLake-X. Its basically Kabylake with more capacitors and bigger heatspreader. This could help with higher overclocking than classic Kabylakes. Kabylake-X have support only for dualchannel mode (up to 2666 MHz 1.2V). After XMP mode or manualy tweaking you can except everything between 3600 MHz to 4400 MHz at DRAM effective frequency.
2)Skylake-X, are HEDT processors Core i7 X and new Core i9 X. Starting as 6C/12T and up to crazy 18C/36T
There is support for Quadchannel memory. Based at first results on web, the memory clock we can expect overclocking of RAM around 3200 to 3800 MHz. All depends on type of memory chips, quality of IMC particular piece of CPU.

APEX series replaced Extreme series in extreme overclocking segment (yes, all fans of DICE, LN2 and LHe are focus directly at this board). This board broked many WRs after first day 🙂 There is example with informations about records from 31.5.2017.


APEX series replaced Extreme series in extreme overclocking segment (yes, all fans of DICE, LN2 and LHe are focus directly at this board). This board broked many WRs after first day 🙂 There is exmaple with informations about records from 31.5.2017. Rampage Extreme is for enthusiast, wattercooling setups, casemodders etc. Strix series is ideal part for daily overlcocking (of course, it can handle LN2 too !) and gamers, streamers...

Rampage VI Extreme - eATX size

-looks awesome, the rainbow AURA effects! But there is also small display for current information about CPU clock, temperatures or speed fans...

The motherboard support again up to 128 GB DDR4 DRAM in up to quadchannel (depends at your CPU - if KB-X or SK-X). In right upper corner are helpfull buttons START, RESET, PCIe and DIMM switchs. Also switch for slow mode, retry and safe button, RGB header and also great ROG DIMM.2 slot for NVMe M2 discs. So Extreme can be realized with Liquid Nitrogen also, if is it your hobby sometimes 😛 Look at crazy numbers of voltage meassuring points.

At the bellow are button to swicth the BIOS (two BIOSes here), many USB ports, MEM OK, again RGB header. Under frontplate near the PCH is place for next M.2



-part of IO. The IO shield is integrated and from left to right there are CLR CMOS button, BIOS Flashbakc button, Wi-Fi+BT device with support 802.11ad standard! Many USB3/3.1, LAN, audio outputs with backlight


-Rampage in the glory 🙂

And last video with short description from GamersNexus
Who knows me, knows me ;)....AMD 3000+, AMD x2 4600+ EE, AMD X4 955 BE C2,2x AMD X4 965 BE C3, AMD X4 970 BE C3, AMD x4 975 BE, AMD x4 980 BE, AMD X6 1090T BE, AMD x6 1100T BE, 2x AMD FX-8120, 2x AMD FX-8150, FX-6300, FX-8300, FX-8320E, FX-8320, FX-8350, FX-8370, FX-8370E, FX-9370, FX-9590, AMD A8-3850, AMD A8-3870K, A8-5600K, A10-5800K, A10-6800K, A10-7850K, A10-7870K, A 5150, Athlon x4 860K, Intel i7-5960X, i7-6700K, Intel i7-4770K, Intel i7-980x, Intel i7 2600k, Intel i7-3770K, i7-3930K.
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Brighttail wrote:
Ah that is a nice to know. Two screws to attach the heatsink to the 10G would make it a lot easier to attach a heatsink, so I agree with you that EK will offer some extra and separate heatsink.

It would be nice if you could take a picture of the motherboard with the I/O shield off and of the heatsink on the chip. It would be nice to see it. 🙂


Yeah, I will post some photos of the patient's innards all taken apart (as my wife words it) either this evening or tomorrow evening at the latest.

DragonPurr wrote:
Yeah, I will post some photos of the patient's innards all taken apart (as my wife words it) either this evening or tomorrow evening at the latest.


Here are some of my oft used computer surgical instruments.
67546

smithkid wrote:
Here are some of my oft used computer surgical instruments.
67546


Yep, surgical hemostats have a multitude of uses in electronics repair. Another indispensable tool is a magnetic ratcheting screwdriver. And here in the U.S., the very best magnetic ratcheting screwdriver is made by Snap-On Tools. I have both their shorter and longer ratcheting screwdriver. Their magnets are strong, they can use various other 100-piece or 200-piece bit driver sets, they are not cheap, but they last forever:

https://store.snapon.com/Standard-Handle-8-3-4-Ratcheting-Standard-Screwdriver-P634146.aspx
https://store.snapon.com/Standard-Handle-12-15-16-Ratcheting-Magnetic-Long-Orange-Screwdriver-P63414...

So here is a very bizarre, but very true, story about using surgical hemostats for PC repair. Yes, it's off-topic, but I think it's funny...

During my second year of full-time study at UT-Austin during 1983, IBM starting interviewing on-campus for part-time positions as electronics technicians at their PC manufacturing plant that they were rapidly expanding at their big IBM campus in north Austin. I had purple-dyed hair and dragon tattoos at the time, I knew that IBM had an ultra-conservative culture, but I applied anyway. I was offered an electronics technician job and started working at IBM 20 to 30 hours every week, and the pay was excellent. I did not receive IBM's full employee benefits such as medical insurance, but I was eligible for their very generous 50%-off employee discount to buy IBM PCs.

IBM used high-speed state-of-the-art robotics to assemble the mobos used on the original PC, PC/XT, and (later in 1984) PC/AT. That was followed by two technician stations where some components such as expansion slot sockets were hand-assembled, followed by a QC technician station that looked for mobo defects using high-quality magnifying lamps. The mobos were then passed to me at the final QA station before being sent to the wave-soldering machines. We had very high quality standards, there were never any production quotas, and each assembly and inspection station took as long as needed to ensure maximum mobo quality. At the same time that I was helping IBM build PCs as a UT-Austin student, Michael Dell was building PCs in his UT-Austin dorm room and selling them as his "PC's Limited" small business.

Anyhoo, a UT-Austin co-ed was seated at the QA station next to me. I noticed that she was using a straight hemostat to help with the repairing and adjusting of components, straightening bent IC chip pins, etc. She was actually using the hemostat as a roach clip for her, ummm, recreational herbs, and she brought it into work to help with fixing mobo components. So I asked my IBM manager if they could buy hemostats for every QC and QA technician to help with fixing and building PC mobos.

All the IBM managers dressed very conservatively, wearing heavily starched white shirts, and navy blue tie and slacks. But the UT-Austin students that they hired sometimes had tattoos and dyed hair. It was the heyday of the punk and new-wave '80s, after all. Many of us students were a very close-knit group at the IBM plant, and we would go club-hopping and listen to live music after work on Friday nights. On the following two school years, I was working part-time at IBM's development office at the same Austin campus, doing systems programming in C code and 8088 assembly language.

So that was how IBM supplied all their PC technicians with hemostats to assist with PC repair - all because a UT-Austin co-ed started using her hemostat roach clip at her QA station, and I asked my manager to buy hemostats for all of us to use. LOL!! True story!

I find the professional I-fixit tool case to be pretty darn sufficient for my computer needs.
Panteks Enthoo Elite / Asus x299 Rampage VI Extreme / Intel I9-7900X / Corsair Dominator RGB 3200MHz

MSI GTX 1080 TI / 2x Intel 900p / Samsung 970 Pro 512GB

Samsung 850 PRO 512GB / Western Digital Gold 8TB HD

Corsair AX 1200i / Corsair Platinum K95 / Asus Chakram

Acer XB321HK 4k, IPS, G-sync Monitor / Water Cooled / Asus G571JT Laptop

Brighttail wrote:
I find the professional I-fixit tool case to be pretty darn sufficient for my computer needs.


Yep, they make a great kit too. Sometimes, though, you need far more torque that what can be applied using the skinny ratcheting screwdriver. So you put the bit onto the Snap-On*ratcheting screwdriver for far greater twisting leverage.

DragonPurr wrote:
Yep, they make a great kit too. Sometimes, though, you need far more torque that what can be applied using the skinny ratcheting screwdriver. So you put the bit onto the Snap-On*ratcheting screwdriver for far greater twisting leverage.


There is a hole in top of the screwdriver that you can insert the extender for more torque now. 🙂

As for being tested, I would like to think ALL top end boards are Quality tested to ensure they boot up and those two slots are the first two you would put sticks in. 🙂

More likely yes your board was Quality tested, but not all boards are but random ones on the production line would be pulled. Is there a sticker somewhere on it with a Quality reviewer number?
Panteks Enthoo Elite / Asus x299 Rampage VI Extreme / Intel I9-7900X / Corsair Dominator RGB 3200MHz

MSI GTX 1080 TI / 2x Intel 900p / Samsung 970 Pro 512GB

Samsung 850 PRO 512GB / Western Digital Gold 8TB HD

Corsair AX 1200i / Corsair Platinum K95 / Asus Chakram

Acer XB321HK 4k, IPS, G-sync Monitor / Water Cooled / Asus G571JT Laptop

Brighttail wrote:
There is a hole in top of the screwdriver that you can insert the extender for more torque now. 🙂


Meh... along with mobo installations, if you modify and disassemble PC cases, other electronics, build furniture, etc, nothing beats a great beefy ratcheting screwdriver with a thick handle. You can also never have enough bit drivers and other contraptions when modifying or repairing electronics, thus a 100-piece or 200-piece bit driver set comes in handy. I have upgraded the SSD on a number of ultrabooks and tablets that were advertised as "No User Serviceable Parts Inside". But if you have the right tools, you can carefully open up the tablet or ultrabook, upgrade interior components, and put it back together.

Looking at the EK water block:*https://www.ekwb.com/shop/ek-fb-asus-rog-r6e-rgb-monoblock-acetal-nickel

Can you put gskillz in all dim slots with the led cable coming out of the side of the block? It looks like it might cover the closest slot.

DragonPurr wrote:
Yep, surgical hemostats have a multitude of uses in electronics repair. Another indispensable tool is a magnetic ratcheting screwdriver. And here in the U.S., the very best magnetic ratcheting screwdriver is made by Snap-On Tools. I have both their shorter and longer ratcheting screwdriver. Their magnets are strong, they can use various other 100-piece or 200-piece bit driver sets, they are not cheap, but they last forever:

https://store.snapon.com/Standard-Handle-8-3-4-Ratcheting-Standard-Screwdriver-P634146.aspx
https://store.snapon.com/Standard-Handle-12-15-16-Ratcheting-Magnetic-Long-Orange-Screwdriver-P63414...

So here is a very bizarre, but very true, story about using surgical hemostats for PC repair. Yes, it's off-topic, but I think it's funny...

During my second year of full-time study at UT-Austin during 1983, IBM starting interviewing on-campus for part-time positions as electronics technicians at their PC manufacturing plant that they were rapidly expanding at their big IBM campus in north Austin. I had purple-dyed hair and dragon tattoos at the time, I knew that IBM had an ultra-conservative culture, but I applied anyway. I was offered an electronics technician job and started working at IBM 20 to 30 hours every week, and the pay was excellent. I did not receive IBM's full employee benefits such as medical insurance, but I was eligible for their very generous 50%-off employee discount to buy IBM PCs.

IBM used high-speed state-of-the-art robotics to assemble the mobos used on the original PC, PC/XT, and (later in 1984) PC/AT. That was followed by two technician stations where some components such as expansion slot sockets were hand-assembled, followed by a QC technician station that looked for mobo defects using high-quality magnifying lamps. The mobos were then passed to me at the final QA station before being sent to the wave-soldering machines. We had very high quality standards, there were never any production quotas, and each assembly and inspection station took as long as needed to ensure maximum mobo quality. At the same time that I was helping IBM build PCs as a UT-Austin student, Michael Dell was building PCs in his UT-Austin dorm room and selling them as his "PC's Limited" small business.

Anyhoo, a UT-Austin co-ed was seated at the QA station next to me. I noticed that she was using a straight hemostat to help with the repairing and adjusting of components, straightening bent IC chip pins, etc. She was actually using the hemostat as a roach clip for her, ummm, recreational herbs, and she brought it into work to help with fixing mobo components. So I asked my IBM manager if they could buy hemostats for every QC and QA technician to help with fixing and building PC mobos.

All the IBM managers dressed very conservatively, wearing heavily starched white shirts, and navy blue tie and slacks. But the UT-Austin students that they hired sometimes had tattoos and dyed hair. It was the heyday of the punk and new-wave '80s, after all. Many of us students were a very close-knit group at the IBM plant, and we would go club-hopping and listen to live music after work on Friday nights. On the following two school years, I was working part-time at IBM's development office at the same Austin campus, doing systems programming in C code and 8088 assembly language.

So that was how IBM supplied all their PC technicians with hemostats to assist with PC repair - all because a UT-Austin co-ed started using her hemostat roach clip at her QA station, and I asked my manager to buy hemostats for all of us to use. LOL!! True story!


I was at UC Davis at the Veterinary School in the 70's and we in Small Animal Surgery "lost" hundreds of hemostats for R clips. By the way my photo was of alligator forceps not hemostats which I originally used for removing grass seeds from dogs ears but now they are used for retrieving nuts, washers and screws that have been dropped into irretrievable places.

smithkid wrote:
I was at UC Davis at the Veterinary School in the 70's and we in Small Animal Surgery "lost" hundreds of hemostats for R clips. By the way my photo was of alligator forceps not hemostats which I originally used for removing grass seeds from dogs ears but now they are used for retrieving nuts, washers and screws that have been dropped into irretrievable places.


Yep, hemostats have the adjustable locking notches on their handles, which makes them more useful than forceps in situations where you need to clamp something. I have also used a locked hemostat as a "third hand" or also a "fourth hand" to hold onto something when working on stuff, or to clamp two objects together while I let the adhesive cure between the objects. Forceps and tweezers are also very useful, but hemostats have even more uses.