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Rampage VI Extreme (LGA2066, Intel X299) - info, experience, BIOSes etc.

FlanK3r
Level 13
Intel public HEDT CPus with platfrom Intel X299 at Computex 2017. The CPU reviews are still under embargo for short time ,-). But some informations are officially out and OK with Intels NDA.

Intel X299 is really highend chipset for enthusiast CPUs. This year very powerfull, much more than anyone hoped. Because this year is AMD also very strong at CPU side (Announced not only 8 cores with SMT, but also up to 16C with SMT for AMD X399), Intel will launch step by step 6C/12T, 8C/16T, 10C/20T....Everything?:) Nooo, continue it with 12C/24T, 14C/28T, 16C/32T and new flagship 18C/36T !!!


New LGA2066 will be new one after 2011v3...Great value is, you can put in two generation CPUs. More info bellow.
1) Kabylake-X with new CPUs Core i5 X a Core i7 X. Those CPUs are KabyLake-X. Its basically Kabylake with more capacitors and bigger heatspreader. This could help with higher overclocking than classic Kabylakes. Kabylake-X have support only for dualchannel mode (up to 2666 MHz 1.2V). After XMP mode or manualy tweaking you can except everything between 3600 MHz to 4400 MHz at DRAM effective frequency.
2)Skylake-X, are HEDT processors Core i7 X and new Core i9 X. Starting as 6C/12T and up to crazy 18C/36T
There is support for Quadchannel memory. Based at first results on web, the memory clock we can expect overclocking of RAM around 3200 to 3800 MHz. All depends on type of memory chips, quality of IMC particular piece of CPU.

APEX series replaced Extreme series in extreme overclocking segment (yes, all fans of DICE, LN2 and LHe are focus directly at this board). This board broked many WRs after first day 🙂 There is example with informations about records from 31.5.2017.


APEX series replaced Extreme series in extreme overclocking segment (yes, all fans of DICE, LN2 and LHe are focus directly at this board). This board broked many WRs after first day 🙂 There is exmaple with informations about records from 31.5.2017. Rampage Extreme is for enthusiast, wattercooling setups, casemodders etc. Strix series is ideal part for daily overlcocking (of course, it can handle LN2 too !) and gamers, streamers...

Rampage VI Extreme - eATX size

-looks awesome, the rainbow AURA effects! But there is also small display for current information about CPU clock, temperatures or speed fans...

The motherboard support again up to 128 GB DDR4 DRAM in up to quadchannel (depends at your CPU - if KB-X or SK-X). In right upper corner are helpfull buttons START, RESET, PCIe and DIMM switchs. Also switch for slow mode, retry and safe button, RGB header and also great ROG DIMM.2 slot for NVMe M2 discs. So Extreme can be realized with Liquid Nitrogen also, if is it your hobby sometimes 😛 Look at crazy numbers of voltage meassuring points.

At the bellow are button to swicth the BIOS (two BIOSes here), many USB ports, MEM OK, again RGB header. Under frontplate near the PCH is place for next M.2



-part of IO. The IO shield is integrated and from left to right there are CLR CMOS button, BIOS Flashbakc button, Wi-Fi+BT device with support 802.11ad standard! Many USB3/3.1, LAN, audio outputs with backlight


-Rampage in the glory 🙂

And last video with short description from GamersNexus
Who knows me, knows me ;)....AMD 3000+, AMD x2 4600+ EE, AMD X4 955 BE C2,2x AMD X4 965 BE C3, AMD X4 970 BE C3, AMD x4 975 BE, AMD x4 980 BE, AMD X6 1090T BE, AMD x6 1100T BE, 2x AMD FX-8120, 2x AMD FX-8150, FX-6300, FX-8300, FX-8320E, FX-8320, FX-8350, FX-8370, FX-8370E, FX-9370, FX-9590, AMD A8-3850, AMD A8-3870K, A8-5600K, A10-5800K, A10-6800K, A10-7850K, A10-7870K, A 5150, Athlon x4 860K, Intel i7-5960X, i7-6700K, Intel i7-4770K, Intel i7-980x, Intel i7 2600k, Intel i7-3770K, i7-3930K.
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Vislor72 wrote:
It is possible to use all 9 mounting holes. The armor is two parts, you remove the screw that is visible between the 3rd and 4th PCIe x16 slots and you can then remove the lower right part of the armor from the top of the board. Once removed you have access to the mounting screws underneath.

Sorry for the pic quality, but this should give an idea:

Top information. I was worried that I could only see 7 mounting screw holes.

mpoffo wrote:
Hello fellow RVIEer's. I got my board today and all basically looks good. Like others some of the plastic protection was coming off but not too bad. Extremely happy to have it!

Anyway take a look at this pic:

It appears that the one screw hole for the VRM heatsink fan brace is rusted? I have not tried screwing the screw in it yet. I assume it will not cause issues with functionality but I am a bit disappointed to see it. It did not rub off so it is not a compound that I am aware of. I am wondering if others have this issue. If the screw hole works then I will live with it although I rather not have the blemish there to begin with I suppose. Raja any thoughts on how I can address this?

Also, are there instructions some where on how to remove the chipset cover. 2 of the mounting screws are covered by it. I see one screw for the cover but was not sure if there were more. Or is it not necessary to use those to mounting holes?


To remove the PCH chipset cover, just unscrew the one visible screw that is located over the on-board M.2 slot's armor and located above the bottom PCIe slot. Once you remove that screw, the M.2 armor cover is attached to the black PCH cover and the whole thing lifts off easily as one piece.

I looked at the two screw holes on my VRM heatsinks, and they don't have any blemishes there. Is that the only blemish you see? I scanned over my three mobos using a magnifying glass this afternoon and could not find any scratch, discoloration, or sign of use, even though the PCH cover on all three mobos had an polygonal smudge outline as if there used to be a plastic sheet lightly glued onto the cover, but someone removed the plastic sheet on the PCH cover on all the mobos.

There are also 11 screws on the back of the mobo that would require you to possibly unscrew the mobo from your case's standoffs after you have installed it, depending upon how big your case's mobo tray cutout opening is:

Two screws mount the VRM heatsink.
Two screws, outlined in silver, mount the "Republic of Gamers" block.
Two screws, outlined in silver, mount the I/O cover.
Two screws mount the I/O cover's heatsink.
One screw mounts the "SupremeFX" audio cover.
Two screws, outlined in silver, mount the top part of the PCIe armor. You would need to remove these to replace the CMOS battery that is hidden under the top area of the PCIe armor. It would have been nice if these screws were accessible from the front of the mobo, but I understand why Asus put these two screws on the back for a clean look on the armor.

DragonPurr wrote:
To remove the PCH chipset cover, just unscrew the one visible screw that is located over the on-board M.2 slot's armor and located above the bottom PCIe slot. Once you remove that screw, the M.2 armor cover is attached to the black PCH cover and the whole thing lifts off easily as one piece.

I looked at the two screw holes on my VRM heatsinks, and they don't have any blemishes there. Is that the only blemish you see? I scanned over my three mobos using a magnifying glass this afternoon and could not find any scratch, discoloration, or sign of use, even though the PCH cover on all three mobos had an polygonal smudge outline as if there used to be a plastic sheet lightly glued onto the cover, but someone removed the plastic sheet on the PCH cover on all the mobos.

There are also 11 screws on the back of the mobo that would require you to possibly unscrew the mobo from your case's standoffs after you have installed it, depending upon how big your case's mobo tray cutout opening is:

Two screws mount the VRM heatsink.
Two screws, outlined in silver, mount the "Republic of Gamers" block.
Two screws, outlined in silver, mount the top part of the PCIe armor. You would need to remove these to replace the CMOS battery that is hidden under the top area of the PCIe armor. It would have been nice if these screws were accessible from the front of the mobo, but I understand why Asus put these two screws on the back.
Two screws, outlined in silver, mount the I/O cover.
Two screws mount the I/O cover's heatsink.
One screw mounts the "SupremeFX" audio cover.


I didn't see any other issues. It appears to be the only blemish. I won't have time to play with things until the end of the week. If the screw hole works I will live with it. If not I wonder if I can get a replacement heat sink.
RVIE X299 System:
Windows 10 Prof 64-bit | Intel Core i9 7900x | ASUS Rampage VI Extreme | Corsair AX 1200i PSU
Corsair 900D | 32 GB 3200 G.SKILL Trident RGB Series | RTX 3090/EVGA GTX 1080 | Acer X34 Predator Monitor
Samsung 840 PRO 256 GB | Samsung 850 EVO 500 GB | Intel 520 SATA SSD 240GB HD | 2 & 4 TB WD Black Hard Drive
Creative Sound Blaster Z | Logitech THX 5.1 speaker setup

DragonPurr wrote:
To remove the PCH chipset cover, just unscrew the one visible screw that is located over the on-board M.2 slot's armor and located above the bottom PCIe slot. Once you remove that screw, the M.2 armor cover is attached to the black PCH cover and the whole thing lifts off easily as one piece.

I looked at the two screw holes on my VRM heatsinks, and they don't have any blemishes there. Is that the only blemish you see? I scanned over my three mobos using a magnifying glass this afternoon and could not find any scratch, discoloration, or sign of use, even though the PCH cover on all three mobos had an polygonal smudge outline as if there used to be a plastic sheet lightly glued onto the cover, but someone removed the plastic sheet on the PCH cover on all the mobos.

There are also 11 screws on the back of the mobo that would require you to possibly unscrew the mobo from your case's standoffs after you have installed it, depending upon how big your case's mobo tray cutout opening is:

Two screws mount the VRM heatsink.
Two screws, outlined in silver, mount the "Republic of Gamers" block.
Two screws, outlined in silver, mount the I/O cover.
Two screws mount the I/O cover's heatsink.
One screw mounts the "SupremeFX" audio cover.
Two screws, outlined in silver, mount the top part of the PCIe armor. You would need to remove these to replace the CMOS battery that is hidden under the top area of the PCIe armor. It would have been nice if these screws were accessible from the front of the mobo, but I understand why Asus put these two screws on the back for a clean look on the armor.



Are there just 2 screws at the top of the armor covering the CMOS battery, or does the whole armor need to be removed? Thanks.
*
MZ790A Bios 2002, GSkill F5-8000J3848H16GX2-TZRK, 13900KS, EKWB D5 TBE 300, Seasonic Prime TX-1600 ATX 3.0, Asus Strix 4090 w/ Optimus block, Phanteks Enthoo Elite, Asus Claymore 2, Asus Gladius 3, Asus XG349C, Samsung 990, Windows 11 Pro

Brighttail
Level 11
Well I just got a reply from EK about the 10 G chip situation:
"Thank you for contacting us.
Yes, the stock heatsink is to be removed from the motherboard and the monoblock will cover all the essential cooling including the 10G chip, otherwise, it wouldn't be made for it. The manuals are still in works and once the monoblock goes out of pre-order, they will be added to the webshop. The monoblock will cover the 10G as well as we got information from our development team.
It's going to be this part of the monoblock which replaces the stock heatsink 10G: Thank you for contacting us.
Yes, the stock heatsink is to be removed from the motherboard and the monoblock will cover all the essential cooling including the 10G chip, otherwise, it wouldn't be made for it. The manuals are still in works and once the monoblock goes out of pre-order, they will be added to the webshop. The monoblock will cover the 10G as well as we got information from our development team.
It's going to be this part of the monoblock which replaces the stock heatsink 10G: "

So it looks good. 🙂
Panteks Enthoo Elite / Asus x299 Rampage VI Extreme / Intel I9-7900X / Corsair Dominator RGB 3200MHz

MSI GTX 1080 TI / 2x Intel 900p / Samsung 970 Pro 512GB

Samsung 850 PRO 512GB / Western Digital Gold 8TB HD

Corsair AX 1200i / Corsair Platinum K95 / Asus Chakram

Acer XB321HK 4k, IPS, G-sync Monitor / Water Cooled / Asus G571JT Laptop

Brighttail
Level 11
Looking back at my email EK says that the monoblock "will cover" the 10 G chip. I know English isn't their first language but I honestly can't see how the monoblock would cover the 10 g chip as it looks, so there has to be an add on.
Panteks Enthoo Elite / Asus x299 Rampage VI Extreme / Intel I9-7900X / Corsair Dominator RGB 3200MHz

MSI GTX 1080 TI / 2x Intel 900p / Samsung 970 Pro 512GB

Samsung 850 PRO 512GB / Western Digital Gold 8TB HD

Corsair AX 1200i / Corsair Platinum K95 / Asus Chakram

Acer XB321HK 4k, IPS, G-sync Monitor / Water Cooled / Asus G571JT Laptop

Brighttail wrote:
Looking back at my email EK says that the monoblock "will cover" the 10 G chip. I know English isn't their first language but I honestly can't see how the monoblock would cover the 10 g chip as it looks, so there has to be an add on.


Their wording of "the monoblock will cover all the essential cooling including the 10G chip" will likely mean that they will supply a separate heatsink, ideally using the same two mobo screw holes as the original heatsink. They could get very very fancy and add a heatpipe connecting from their monoblock to a larger I/O cover heatsink, but I doubt they will get that fancy since their R6E monoblock still costs the same $136 as the other EK X299 monoblocks. And as with the original R6E's two heatsinks heatpiped together, a secondary heatsink underneath the I/O cover is ENTIRELY for the benefit of distributing the VRM's heat. The 10G does not need to be heatpiped to another heatsink and it can easily cool with a smaller heatsink compared to that included under the I/O cover right now. But unlike ASRock's Fatal1ty X299 Professional Gaming i9 that uses a separate 10G heatsink, Asus "killed two heat birds with one stone" with their I/O cover heatsink setup.

Edit: And since the EK monoblock fits both the Extreme and Apex, it will most likely be a separate heatsink since the Apex cannot use any other monoblock setup such as a heatpiped I/O cover heatsink.

DragonPurr wrote:
Their wording of "the monoblock will cover all the essential cooling including the 10G chip" will likely mean that they will supply a separate heatsink, ideally using the same two mobo screw holes as the original heatsink. They could get very very fancy and add a heatpipe connecting from their monoblock to a larger I/O cover heatsink, but I doubt they will get that fancy since their R6E monoblock still costs the same $136 as the other EK X299 monoblocks. And as with the original R6E's two heatsinks heatpiped together, a secondary heatsink underneath the I/O cover is ENTIRELY for the benefit of distributing the VRM's heat. The 10G does not need to be heatpiped to another heatsink and it can easily cool with a smaller heatsink compared to that included under the I/O cover right now. But unlike ASRock's Fatal1ty X299 Professional Gaming i9 that uses a separate 10G heatsink, Asus "killed two heat birds with one stone" with their I/O cover heatsink setup.

Edit: And since the EK monoblock fits both the Extreme and Apex, it will most likely be a separate heatsink since the Apex cannot use any other monoblock setup such as a heatpiped I/O cover heatsink.


Yeah, I suspect it will be a small heatsink, with thermal pad and some adhesive to hold it on. Was there an actual heatsink that touched the 10G chip, @dragonpurr or is it just that the heatpipe comes around and touches the chip with a pad on it? You mentioned two screws, are those that hold on the I/O shield or are these separate for the heatsink that covers the 10g chip?
Panteks Enthoo Elite / Asus x299 Rampage VI Extreme / Intel I9-7900X / Corsair Dominator RGB 3200MHz

MSI GTX 1080 TI / 2x Intel 900p / Samsung 970 Pro 512GB

Samsung 850 PRO 512GB / Western Digital Gold 8TB HD

Corsair AX 1200i / Corsair Platinum K95 / Asus Chakram

Acer XB321HK 4k, IPS, G-sync Monitor / Water Cooled / Asus G571JT Laptop

Brighttail wrote:
Yeah, I suspect it will be a small heatsink, with thermal pad and some adhesive to hold it on. Was there an actual heatsink that touched the 10G chip, @dragonpurr or is it just that the heatpipe comes around and touches the chip with a pad on it? You mentioned two screws, are those that hold on the I/O shield or are these separate for the heatsink that covers the 10g chip?


Ideally, the replacement heatsink would just use the same two mounting screws and screw holes that are used by the original I/O heatsink. Any use of an adhesive would not be the right application in this situation. You don't want to glue things together. And you really don't need to.

The I/O heatsink is mounted to the mobo with two screws. The I/O cover is not attached to the heatsink and it is mounted separately to the mobo with two screws. The heatpipe connects both heatsinks, but the heatsink is what contacts the 10G chip.

I had all three R6E mobos laid out on an anti-static mat yesterday evening and started to take things apart, but then wife and I went out to visit friends. The mobos are still there on the breakfast table this morning. My wife laughed and asked if "the patient's operation was a success" since my PC repairing and building tools include four straight and curved hemostats and four straight and curved ceramic tweezers that can also be used while soldering. I should have it all disassembled, reassembled, and start to make some mods today or tomorrow, along with doing some tabletop POST tests this week using the two 7900X CPUs that I already have, just temporarily using a Noctua NH-D15S air cooler. I have less weekend time available for PC stuff because we always head out on Friday afternoons for a weekend of mountain biking, rock climbing, backpacking, alpine and cross-country skiing, and snowshoeing. So all my PC tweaking tends to happen more on the weeknights.

DragonPurr wrote:
Ideally, the replacement heatsink would just use the same two mounting screws and screw holes that are used by the original I/O heatsink. Any use of an adhesive would not be the right application in this situation. You don't want to glue things together. And you really don't need to.

The I/O heatsink is mounted to the mobo with two screws. The I/O cover is not attached to the heatsink and it is mounted separately to the mobo with two screws. The heatpipe connects both heatsinks, but the heatsink is what contacts the 10G chip.

I had all three R6E mobos laid out on an anti-static mat yesterday evening and started to take things apart, but then wife and I went out to visit friends. The mobos are still there on the breakfast table this morning. My wife laughed and asked if "the patient's operation was a success" since my PC repairing and building tools include four straight and curved hemostats and four straight and curved ceramic tweezers that can also be used while soldering. I should have it all disassembled, reassembled, and start to make some mods today or tomorrow, along with doing some tabletop POST tests this week using the two 7900X CPUs that I already have, just temporarily using a Noctua NH-D15S air cooler. I have less weekend time available for PC stuff because we always head out on Friday afternoons for a weekend of mountain biking, rock climbing, backpacking, alpine and cross-country skiing, and snowshoeing. So all my PC tweaking tends to happen more on the weeknights.


Ah that is a nice to know. Two screws to attach the heatsink to the 10G would make it a lot easier to attach a heatsink, so I agree with you that EK will offer some extra and separate heatsink.

It would be nice if you could take a picture of the motherboard with the I/O shield off and of the heatsink on the chip. It would be nice to see it. 🙂
Panteks Enthoo Elite / Asus x299 Rampage VI Extreme / Intel I9-7900X / Corsair Dominator RGB 3200MHz

MSI GTX 1080 TI / 2x Intel 900p / Samsung 970 Pro 512GB

Samsung 850 PRO 512GB / Western Digital Gold 8TB HD

Corsair AX 1200i / Corsair Platinum K95 / Asus Chakram

Acer XB321HK 4k, IPS, G-sync Monitor / Water Cooled / Asus G571JT Laptop