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Power Supply with input & output

celticguy75
Level 8
Ok, Haven't bought a PSU in a long time, but back when I first started playing about with them, you could buy a power supply which had an input socket (power to pc) and an output socket (power to monitor for example).

Do these still exist, or in these days of high power consumption machines, is the risk of overstretching the PSU too big a risk to do this? I'm just trying to think of ways to cut the number of power cables, because currently i've got the PC (1) Monitor (2), Speakers (3) Router (4) & Cable Modem (5, although I know this can get solved to one with a combination router/modem). Then there's my external DVD writer (6 though not in constant use and as part of my new build, this will be replaced), my Mybook (7, though not in constant use and will be partially replaced by increased hard disk in new build and the Mybook becoming an external backup rather than data storage) Also there is my fan (7, necessary at times for cooling myself) and telephone (8, constant use). This went down by one when I replaced my Logitech Revolution with a Performance MX (thank god)
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xeromist
Moderator
I'm not sure if I've seen any recently but certainly not in any PSU I'd want for a gaming PC. You could mod a surge protector into your case and then you could use any PSU that you wanted.
A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. On my desk, I have a work station…

celticguy75
Level 8
Thanks Xero, I haven't seen any for a long time either. I guess once the PSU output starting to climb to run the bigger machines, the PSU manufacters decided to phase out that idea to save space/weight & cost and to reduce the danger of power fluctuations due to the shared load.

xeromist
Moderator
That, yes, but I think it might also have to do with the move to momentary switches and sleep mode on most devices like monitors. I think those were switched outlets so that you could plug in something like your monitor and have it come on with the PC. Now the default when supplied with power is off so having a switched outlet doesn't allow a device to come on with the PC. That and power spikes when you first turn a device on so if they are all chained together to the same outlet it could cause an unhealthy surge in high powered PC's.
A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. On my desk, I have a work station…