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Overclocking Tools ... ?

Denna
Level 11
When attempting to determine what's causing an overclocking related crash, how do you determine the culprit ?

Are there monitoring tools that can indicate the problem and solution ?
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11 REPLIES 11

Denna
Level 11
Chino,

Let's say the Core, Uncore, System Agent or something else voltage related needs an adjustment.

When running a stress test, how can you tell which function needs to be adjusted when the system locks up, blue screens or reboots ?

Denna wrote:

When running a stress test, how can you tell which function needs to be adjusted when the system locks up, blue screens or reboots ?



Many times its not a clear cut answer - So you need to adjust via trial/testing etc...

There are specific tests which predominately test the various subsystems so these can help to some degree in tracking down what is causing the lockup eg mem Vs cpu etc.

Costas,

Trial and error testing reminds me of the game Whac-a-mole.

Are you saying the best overclockers are merely guessing like the rest of us ?

Costas wrote:
Many times its not a clear cut answer - So you need to adjust via trial/testing etc...

There are specific tests which predominately test the various subsystems so these can help to some degree in tracking down what is causing the lockup eg mem Vs cpu etc.


Costas,

There's an opportunity to make some money if someone could come up with a program on a bootable drive that could access a BIOS and automatically iterate through various configurations and stress tests. That could easily save intermediate overclockers weeks of trial and error testing. As long as consumer overclocking has been around, it's surprising it doesn't already exist.

Denna wrote:
Chino,

Let's say the Core, Uncore, System Agent or something else voltage related needs an adjustment.

When running a stress test, how can you tell which function needs to be adjusted when the system locks up, blue screens or reboots ?


Depends on what you're overclocking. If it's only the core, then mostly Vcore.

Denna
Level 11
Chino,

Let's say you have a stable overclock for daily use.

Then you run a stress test or benchmark that causes a crash.

Where do you start ?

It seems like overclocking is less scientific and more like random button mashing in a game.

I used to watch voltage changes of various components in AIDA64's stress test thinking that an insufficient voltage might be indicated during a stop of the stress test. But modifying voltages rarely produced an increase in stability. What that method did produce was a lot of unnecessary voltage increases - which were later reduced.

Denna wrote:
Chino,
Let's say you have a stable overclock for daily use.

Then you run a stress test or benchmark that causes a crash.

Where do you start ?

It seems like overclocking is less scientific and more like random button mashing in a game.

I used to watch voltage changes of various components in AIDA64's stress test thinking that an insufficient voltage might be indicated during a stop of the stress test. But modifying voltages rarely produced an increase in stability. What that method did produce was a lot of unnecessary voltage increases - which were later reduced.



Use a workflow like this to cut out some of the guesswork. This isn't down to the level of a complete amateur, but anyone with a bit of nous should understand:

http://edgeup.asus.com/2016/06/17/broadwell-e-overclocking-guide/6/

The rest of being good and efficient at overclocking is down to experience and understanding of subsystems. The type of stuff that needs a solid foundation in electronics that cannot be taught in the casual format of an overclocking forum. However, most people don't have that level of understanding but get by on the little correct hearsay there is posted by users on forums and manage to overclock just fine.

Raja@ASUS wrote:
Use a workflow like this to cut out some of the guesswork. This isn't down to the level of a complete amateur, but anyone with a bit of nous should understand:

http://edgeup.asus.com/2016/06/17/broadwell-e-overclocking-guide/6/

The rest of being good and efficient at overclocking is down to experience and understanding of subsystems. The type of stuff that needs a solid foundation in electronics that cannot be taught in the casual format of an overclocking forum. However, most people don't have that level of understanding but get by on the little correct hearsay there is posted by users on forums and manage to overclock just fine.


Raja,

That's a lot easier to read than most overclocking guides.

Of course, everyone would have a good laugh if they knew who this build was for.