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Novice confused about UEFI Manual Mode - CPU Core Voltage Override

boneil
Level 7
I have an i7-6700K Intel Processor and the CPU voltage was 1.280v in UEFI, which was a little high. I don't plan on overclocking, and the stock voltage for this processor is 1.2v. So I set the CPU Core/Cache Voltage to Manual Mode and set the - CPU Core Voltage Override to 1.200v and rebooted the system. I got this new image from UEFI below.

60730

I have two questions.


  • Why is the CPU Core/Cache Voltage 1.184v when I manually choose 1.200v?
  • I read that Manual Mode Voltage Override is static and that the CPU voltage can't fluctuate when used. Does Turbo Boost Technology take priority and increase the voltage at loads in spite of voltage being static?
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7 REPLIES 7

Nate152
Moderator
Hi boneil

When your cpu ramps up to 4200MHz the voltage may increase but you can lower the voltage with a negative offset.

1.184v is fine if your system is stable and your temp is great at 27c, what I'd do now is run a stress test and see where the voltage is when the cpu is under full load. However much it's going over 1.20v you can use a negative offset to counter the voltage overshoot.

You can use ROG CPU-Z or HWinfo for cpu voltage monitoring if you don't have a cpu voltage monitoring program.

ROG CPU-Z
Scroll to the top and click "setup" in the ROG version, then click download now and click run.
http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html#version-history

HWinfo - I see your OS is N/A
https://www.hwinfo.com/download.php

ROG Realbench for stress testing, click Stress test beside Benchmark, select how many GB of ram you have, the 15 minute test is fine.
http://rog.asus.com/rog-pro/realbench-v2-leaderboard/

You can switch the cpu core/cache voltage from manual mode to adaptive mode and enter your voltage (1.20v) in the "Additional Turbo Mode cpu core voltage" then just below that enter in the negative offset. Just subtract how much it's going over 1.20v during the test and enter it in the negative offset, this should put you at or very close to 1.20v

Nate152 wrote:
Hi boneil

When your cpu ramps up to 4200MHz the voltage may increase but you can lower the voltage with a negative offset.

1.184v is fine if your system is stable and your temp is great at 27c, what I'd do now is run a stress test and see where the voltage is when the cpu is under full load. However much it's going over 1.20v you can use a negative offset to counter the voltage overshoot.

You can use ROG CPU-Z or HWinfo for cpu voltage monitoring if you don't have a cpu voltage monitoring program.

ROG CPU-Z
Scroll to the top and click "setup" in the ROG version, then click download now and click run.
http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html#version-history

HWinfo - I see your OS is N/A
https://www.hwinfo.com/download.php

ROG Realbench for stress testing, click Stress test beside Benchmark, select how many GB of ram you have, the 15 minute test is fine.
http://rog.asus.com/rog-pro/realbench-v2-leaderboard/

You can switch the cpu core/cache voltage from manual mode to adaptive mode and enter your voltage (1.20v) in the "Additional Turbo Mode cpu core voltage" then just below that enter in the negative offset. Just subtract how much it's going over 1.20v during the test and enter it in the negative offset, this should put you at or very close to 1.20v


Thank you for the instruction Nate. I will follow it and run CPU-Z once I get my OS installed. You've helped answer one of my previous questions in the past as well and I want to thank you again for being so helpful. I'm trying my best to develop a full understanding of how UEFI operates so I can make less mistakes. Could you possibly provide me with insight to the two questions I asked in my original post please?

Nate152
Moderator
You're welcome

Question 1 - It seems you have a very good 6700k if it's only using 1.18v when setting 1.20v. You can use a positive offset of + 0.016v to put you at 1.20v but I wouldn't if it's happy with the lower voltage. It's something to be happy about more than concerned with. 🙂

Question 2 - You are correct the cpu voltage will not throttle down when in manual mode is why I suggested to use adaptive mode. Do you have turbo enabled?

Nate152 wrote:
You're welcome

Question 1 - It seems you have a very good 6700k if it's only using 1.18v when setting 1.20v. You can use a positive offset of + 0.016v to put you at 1.20v but I wouldn't if it's happy with the lower voltage. It's something to be happy about more than concerned with. 🙂

Question 2 - You are correct the cpu voltage will not throttle down when in manual mode is why I suggested to use adaptive mode. Do you have turbo enabled?


I plan on having turbo enabled, but I don't know if it is right now.

  • Does turbo mode not work when I manually override CPU voltage?
  • And am I correct to assume that I should manually override CPU voltage to desired level, and then set adaptive mode voltage offsets?

Nate152
Moderator
All right

Yes turbo works when setting the voltage manually, in manual mode the cpu frequency will throttle but the voltage does not.

With turbo enabled this will put your cpu at 4200MHz but should still run stable with 1.20v.

Once you find the lowest stable voltage in manual mode then just switch to adaptive mode, run a stress test and see where the voltage is then use a negative offset to put the cpu voltage at 1.20v. It usually draws a little more voltage under load when in adaptive mode but not a big deal as the offset will counter it.

Okay Nate, I'll go ahead and do that after my OS is installed. Thank you very much for explaining it to me.

Nate152
Moderator
You're welcome boneil

I'm interested in your results so give us an update as soon as you can, if you have any questions along the way please ask. 🙂