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Is my brand new asus strix motherboard bad?

buster84
Level 7
I have been having one hell of a time overclocking my 6800k. The worst part is that its not the overclock that is the problem. I found a great stable setting on manual for 4.3ghz at 1.257v and the only way i can achieve this is on manual.

Whenever i choose adaptive or offset i set the value to 0.211 which should max the voltage at 1.258v when combined with the stock 1.046v however, the problem that im having is huge voltage spikes at full load (or performance mode in windows) The volts literally jump upto 1.5v or at times 1.55v and that is not good at all.

The wierd part about this is that it doesnt happen all the time. I have been able to run stress tests and it never moved above 1.258 but other times it would spike to 1.4v or 1.5v and not drop unless i stopped the bench, or changed my power settings back to power saver. Is this normal behavior for adaptive or offset mode? If not does that mean i have a bad board?

Ive attached some photos. I've even tried going negative on the offset and it had no effect.
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3 REPLIES 3

sectionate
Level 12
what psu do you have? check all your motherboard connecitons
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sectionate wrote:
what psu do you have? check all your motherboard connecitons


I'm using the recommended by Asus EVGA SuperNOVA 1200 P2, 80+ PLATINUM 1200W, 220-P2-1200-X.

Im also using ram from there support list (G.SKILL TridentZ Series 32GB F4-3200C15Q-32GTZSW).

All of my motherboard connections are fine, I doubled checked anyways, but I couldn't imagine this being an issue. Something is way off, either I have a bad board or adaptive really sucks to the point it'll destroy CPUs from over volting. I'm have a one cpu cord connected to the cpu 8 pin slot and another cpu cord connected to the 4 pin slot on the motherboard. All of my computer parts are less than 10 days old. They were all new.

I tried to follow Asus guide on how adaptive mode works.

https://edgeup.asus.com/2016/06/17/broadwell-e-overclocking-guide/5/

Raja
Level 13
buster84 wrote:


Whenever i choose adaptive or offset i set the value to 0.211 which should max the voltage at 1.258v when combined with the stock 1.046v however, the problem that im having is huge voltage spikes at full load (or performance mode in windows) The volts literally jump upto 1.5v or at times 1.55v and that is not good at all.




This is the mistake. Offset and Adaptive have different requirements from a settings perspective. The base VID for Offset moves with the multiplier ratio. The 0.211 you are applying likely has a base VID around 1.30V, hence why you are seeing 1.50V under load.

Use the Adaptive setting and type the full load voltage you want the CPU to use into the Additional Turbo Mode CPU Core Voltage box. So if you want 1.26V, that's what you need to type into the box. Leave the CPU Core Voltage Offset box set to Auto if you do this. You may want to clear CMOS first, just to undo any strange handiwork from the previous misadventure. Bear in mind that you cannot set Adaptive to a value lower than the base VID for the CPU ratio. If it really is 1.30V at the target CPU ratio, then that will be the lowest Adaptive voltage you can use.


To get around the limitations, you can either use a negative offset to bring the load voltage down - although this has implications for stability as the CPU comes out of idle. Or, you can use the ASUS Thermal Control Tool. However, I'd make sure you understand how to use Adaptive/Offset voltages properly first; the other solutions are more complex and could end up with a nasty outcome if applied wrongly.