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Trouble Getting RAM to 2133MHz on RIVE BE with a 4930k

riesscar
Level 10
Hello,

I have been experiencing random BSOD's when attempting to get my Corsair Dominator Platinum QVL verified RAM to run at advertised speed of 2133MHz. I have 4 8GB sticks running in quad channel config. My PSU is a Corsair ax1200i, and my cpu is 4930k. The symptoms of the problem are as follows , and I find them strange to say the least:

If I set the overclock to XMP, the computer won't get past the windows boot up screen (if it even gets there) without a BSOD. If I manually set the memory to the timings and voltage dictated by the XMP profile, I am usually able to boot up without incident; however, I get random BSOD's, followed on subsequent boot by a bios warning that the overclock failed and to press F1 to enter setup. Moreover, the BSOD screen in all of these scenarios hangs and the computer never reboots. I have to manually kill the computer, then reboot. The board overclocks the cpu to 4500MHz when optimal settings are loaded.

Here is some info on the BSOD's, although I am fairly new to crash dumps and the like, so I can provide any further info if I am instructed on how to obtain it.

1. The BSOD always reports the following error : WHEA_UNCORRECTABLE_ERROR

I know that this is simply a general error message indicating hardware failure of some sort.

2. When I run bluescreenview.exe, I get the following info:

Bug Check Code: 0x00000124
Parameter 1: 00000000`00000000
Parameter 2: ffffe000`07800028
Parameter 3: 00000000`be200000
Parameter 4: 00000000`000b110a
Caused by Driver: ntoskrnl.exe
Caused by Address: ntoskrnl.exe+14dca0
File Description: NT Kernel & System


I know that this info is almost certainly insufficient to solve the problem, but any help would be greatly appreciated. For instance, could someone suggest BIOS settings, or a series of steps, in order to overclock the memory to its capable specs while maintaining system stability? Is the problem even with my BIOS settings, or is a driver causing these issues? I am at a loss right now.

Thanks again for any help,

Carson
20,499 Views
48 REPLIES 48

Raja
Level 13
1) Which UEFI version are you running?

2) What's VCCSA defaulting to when XMP is engaged?

3) Try reverting the CPU to stock speed first. See if you still get WHEA errors with XMP there.

-Raja

Raja@ASUS wrote:
1) Which UEFI version are you running?

2) What's VCCSA defaulting to when XMP is engaged?

3) Try reverting the CPU to stock speed first. See if you still get WHEA errors with XMP there.

-Raja


Hey Raja,

Thanks for the quick response. I managed to get the RAM to 1866MHz without having to manually set any voltages or anything else, except for the memory frequency setting of course. Perhaps this is due to the fact that IVY-E supports RAM at this speed... or maybe I'm in for another BSOD in the near future (although its been ~6hrs and has been running without issue). I mention this because, out of curiosity, I wonder whether or not I will really see performance gains if I clock the RAM to 2133MHz. I suppose that I would like to take full advantage of the hardware given the price premium, but do the increased timings (9-11-11-31 @ 2133MHz vs 9-9-9-24 @1866MHz) nullify any would-be performance gains, or -- even worse -- degrade performance in certain scenarios. I have read different views on this. Some say that latency timings are so fast nowadays that their is no noticeable difference between 9 and 11 or 24 and 31. Others have claimed that there is a noticeable performance jump from 1866MHz to 2133MHz, but that performance gains begin to become negligible after that due to most applications inability to utilize this speed increase. Anyway, I digress.

To answer your questions:

1. I am not sure what you mean by "which UEFI version". If you mean which BIOS revision it is the newest one (0507) for the RIVE BE. If I have misunderstood, then just know that the UEFI interface is the same as when I first booted the computer, with the exception that I am in Advanced mode.

2. To answer your the question about VCCSA I just want to be sure that I am going to be looking for the right value: you are speaking about the CPU VCCSA Voltage value, correct? If so I will reboot, choose XMP and then report back.

3. I haven't tried this, but it is a good suggestion. Just for clarification: you are suggesting that I choose XMP as the overclock setting in the BIOS, and then manually set the CPU frequency to the supported speed of the processor at turbo setting, correct? If I am able to boot succesfully, do you recommend manually increasing the CPU frequency step by step until I find out what max setting I can use, or are you suggesting this simply to rule out extraneous variables and see if the XMP profile is compatible with the board? If the former is the case, do you recommend stepping up the CPU frequency or CPU strap from within windows via the AI Suite III software or the OC panel, or do you recommend doing so from within the BIOS and just rebooting each time to test the settings?

I hope that I have responded clearly... I am pretty tired from work.

Thanks again for the assistance,

Carson

HalloweenWeed
Level 12
riesscar wrote:
Bug Check Code: 0x00000124

If this is the code you get often you need to increase VTT, but keep <1.5V. Be careful to keep CPU VCCSA within 0.3V of VTT. You will prob need VTT 1.3V or so, and at that point I would set VCCSA no lower than 1.225V; but that's W/Sandy CPU. Leave 2nd VCCSA auto.
i7-3930K; Asus RIVE; G.SKILL Ripjaws Z 4x4GB DDR3 1866; MSI 7870 2GD5/OC; Crucial M4 SSD 256GB;
Corsair 1000HX; Corsair H100, 4x Excalibur 120mm PWM CPU Fan p-p, AS5; SB X-Fi Titanium Fata1ity Pro;
Dell U2412m IPS 1920x1200; Cooler Master HAF 932 case; Tripp-Lite OMNIVS1500 UPS fully Line-interactive.
(EVGA site: ) And I have a second (wife's) computer, Eve.

Overclocking is useless to me if it is not rock stable.

HalloweenWeed wrote:
If this is the code you get often you need to increase VTT, but keep <1.5V. Be careful to keep CPU VCCSA within 0.3V of VTT. You will prob need VTT 1.3V or so, and at that point I would set VCCSA no lower than 1.225V; but that's W/Sandy CPU. Leave 2nd VCCSA auto.


Hey HalloweenWeed,

Thanks for the reply. Forgive my ignorance regarding some of these values, but this is my first board designed for extreme overclocking, so I am still grappling with what seems like a steep learning curve. When you say VTT, are you speaking about the VTT cpu voltage, the VTTDDR AB or CD voltage, or the 2nd VTTCPU voltage setting? Could you clarify what these values actually mean, just so I can understand what I am telling the system, and perhaps someday offer assistance to another lost wannabee enthusiast :).

Thanks for the help,

Carson

HalloweenWeed wrote:
If this is the code you get often you need to increase VTT, but keep <1.5V. Be careful to keep CPU VCCSA within 0.3V of VTT. You will prob need VTT 1.3V or so, and at that point I would set VCCSA no lower than 1.225V; but that's W/Sandy CPU. Leave 2nd VCCSA auto.


Hey HalloweenWeed,

Thanks for the reply. Forgive my ignorance regarding some of these values, but this is my first board designed for extreme overclocking, so I am still grappling with what seems like a steep learning curve. When you say VTT, are you speaking about the VTT cpu voltage, the VTTDDR AB or CD voltage, or the 2nd VTTCPU voltage setting? Could you clarify what these values actually mean, just so I can understand what I am telling the system, and perhaps someday offer assistance to another lost wannabee enthusiast :).

Thanks for the help,

Carson

Arne_Saknussemm
Level 40
That is main VTT CPU voltage....think of this as the voltage the CPU uses for internal communication and talking to chipset. VCCSA is the voltage for communicating to memory controller. The other vtt voltages can be left auto usually.0x124 might be vtt/vccsa...or simply lack of vcore.Is your RAM one single quad Chanel kit?

Arne Saknussemm wrote:
That is main VTT CPU voltage....think of this as the voltage the CPU uses for internal communication and talking to chipset. VCCSA is the voltage for communicating to memory controller. The other vtt voltages can be left auto usually.0x124 might be vtt/vccsa...or simply lack of vcore.Is your RAM one single quad Chanel kit?


Hi Arne,

Thanks so much for the info. Yes, the RAM is one single quad channel kit. I have just one more question (at the moment at least): Is there any chance that I might fry the board or a RAM stick if I set a voltage incorrectly? Or does the board have automated overvoltage protection?

Thanks,

Carson Riess

Raja
Level 13
You would have to set the voltage insanely high for that to happen. Just make sure you type in the correct values.

Let's start with CPU VCCSA - manually set it to 1.20V

Raja@ASUS wrote:
You would have to set the voltage insanely high for that to happen. Just make sure you type in the correct values.

Let's start with CPU VCCSA - manually set it to 1.20V


Hey Raja,

Sorry it has taken me so long to get back to you. I have taken your advice and restored optimal defaults. I then loaded the XMP profile, scrolled down to where the value "CPU VCCSA" was set already to manual. Under that was another setting that said "CPU VCCSA Voltage" and the setting was "Auto". Therefore, the answer to your question of what this value was defaulting to is "Auto" ... I guess.

Per your instruction, I manually set the voltage to 1.20. With this setting I was a able to boot into Windows, but within 10 minutes I got a BSOD. The error codes were the same as before.