cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Sound

Retired
Not applicable
Hello,

I have a set of 5.1 surround speakers and i was wondering if there is any way to have all speakers with the same channels..? The thing is that i am setting up each speaker on a different room and at the moment some speakers have different sounds and are louder than other because of the channels they are in, basically the whole 5.1 thing.

So how can i set all speaker to be as if they were one???

Thanks
359 Views
6 REPLIES 6

pcjunkie209
Level 9
U would probably have to bridge all down to one channel??
"I would rather be gaming!" Grunts-clan.com
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
http://Pcjunkiemods.com
http://c2cmods.com

xeromist
Moderator
What kind of speakers are these? Are they PC speakers or are you running a separate amp? If it is a separate amp then I would just use something like this below and just connect it to the line out. That way you will only get one channel to begin with.

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2102690

If you are trying to run each speaker independently from the sound card without any external amplifier then I'm not sure if that's really possible. I've never tried anything like it.
A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. On my desk, I have a work station…

Retired
Not applicable
Well, i have an old Creative Inspire 5.1 speakers. It comes with 3 3.5mm cables, these cables connect the sound card (front, center, rear channels) to the same channels in the back of the sub-woofer. Then all the speaker connect to their own individual RCA jack.

So there is not amp or anything in between...

??

Thanks

xeromist
Moderator
Well, the sub-woofer actually does act as an amplifier even though it's not discrete like some home theater setups. A lot of these PC speaker systems can operate in either a surround or stereo mode depending on what is connected. I would try connecting only the main front (usually green) connector and see if you still get sound out of the rear speakers. If that much works you would want to try an adapter like the one that I linked to ensure that you don't get any R/L stereo effects going to different rooms.
A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. On my desk, I have a work station…

Retired
Not applicable
xeromist wrote:
Well, the sub-woofer actually does act as an amplifier even though it's not discrete like some home theater setups. A lot of these PC speaker systems can operate in either a surround or stereo mode depending on what is connected. I would try connecting only the main front (usually green) connector and see if you still get sound out of the rear speakers. If that much works you would want to try an adapter like the one that I linked to ensure that you don't get any R/L stereo effects going to different rooms.


So you are saying that if i only connect the main front channel to the sub-woofer i might be able to get sound on the other speakers, right? and if so you would recommend on getting the adapter to avoid any effects going to different speakers, correct?

Thanks!

xeromist
Moderator
Yes, I believe that leaving the other two colored plugs disconnected will result in stereo sound going to all of the surround speakers. Using the adapter plug would further eliminate stereo effects so that all speakers should, in theory, have the exact same sound.

How well this works will depend on how your particular speakers process stereo and monaural input but I can't think of another way to make this work without a discrete amplifier/receiver.
A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. On my desk, I have a work station…