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1070 Founders Edition fans always 100%

danividanivi
Level 7
I am having a trouble with my graphics card.

Temperatures are low, display is great, but since some days ago, its fans are always spinning at full speed (about 5000 rpm)-

I did not any hardware change.

Trying to solve this problem, I installed different nvidia drivers (currently 376.33), the original ones... but it persists.

I installed GPU Tweak too, and it does not work, graphics card does not respond to its comands.

I even reinstalled Windows, removed the card and put it again, and problem didn't go.

Here is a screenshot of GPU-Z:



And here a GPU Tweak one:



Any solution or advise? Thank you
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3 REPLIES 3

Korth
Level 14
I'm guessing software glitch - which you've taken the proper steps to isolate and correct - or it's bad sensor input from the fan itself.

I don't think it's a faulty VRM/PWM component on the graphics card, such a failure would probably affect many other things and cause many other problems you'd see reflected in your temps.

But the fan itself could have a bad tach sensor - I usually save time by starting with the assumption that moving parts are the points of wear and failure when a machine doesn't work. This blower fan appears (on some of these screenshots) to be a common 3-wire variety, probably 12V. Check that the connectors for these (3) wires are properly secured; check the wires themselves for any bends/kinks, stretches, stripped insulation, etc. I don't know if such stuff would qualify for RMA, and I don't know if replacement fans are available, but repairing (and sleeving!) damaged fan wires would be an easy enough project. The fan motor appear to work fine, the card's temps appear fine, but may want to confirm them yourself with your own tachometer and thermometer instruments.

[Edit]
Other people are reporting the same issue. Enough people online to suggest the problem may not be an isolated fan failure but may instead be caused by bad code (and, hopefully, an eventual update/patch to fix it) in NVIDIA's software or firmware. I expect that NVIDIA would issue a recall (or at least some kind of replacement fan kit) if the problem affects enough of their customers.
"All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

[/Korth]

Korth wrote:
I'm guessing software glitch - which you've taken the proper steps to isolate and correct - or it's bad sensor input from the fan itself.

I don't think it's a faulty VRM/PWM component on the graphics card, such a failure would probably affect many other things and cause many other problems you'd see reflected in your temps.

But the fan itself could have a bad tach sensor - I usually save time by starting with the assumption that moving parts are the points of wear and failure when a machine doesn't work. This blower fan appears (on some of these screenshots) to be a common 3-wire variety, probably 12V. Check that the connectors for these (3) wires are properly secured; check the wires themselves for any bends/kinks, stretches, stripped insulation, etc. I don't know if such stuff would qualify for RMA, and I don't know if replacement fans are available, but repairing (and sleeving!) damaged fan wires would be an easy enough project. The fan motor appear to work fine, the card's temps appear fine, but may want to confirm them yourself with your own tachometer and thermometer instruments.

[Edit]
Other people are reporting the same issue. Enough people online to suggest the problem may not be an isolated fan failure but may instead be caused by bad code (and, hopefully, an eventual update/patch to fix it) in NVIDIA's software or firmware. I expect that NVIDIA would issue a recall (or at least some kind of replacement fan kit) if the problem affects enough of their customers.


So what do you suggest? Should I try to open the card and look for bad connected wires, RMA it or wait for any firmware update from NVIDIA?

Thank you very much for your help!

Korth
Level 14
I think the best thing to do is communicate with NVIDIA. Report the issue, provide a link to this thread. Your card may qualify for RMA.

But once you open it up you'll put your RMA/warranty in jeopardy. If you're fully confident your technical skills, tools, and parts could repair, build, or rebuild such a fan then RMA-hassles and warranty be damned, just go for it. But if you're apprehensive about breaking something or "ruining" the factory-perfect scratch-free awesomeness of the card then try to get NVIDIA to fix it instead. Part of the premium cost you paid for that card is the warranty you purchased - you have little to lose by using it.

If you're in Canada, still have original receipt and packaging/etc, and purchased the card within last 14 days ... you can always return it to the vendor for exchange, refund, or store credit - for no reason at all, you can just say "I'm not satisfied with this product". You can also challenge any "restocking fees", extra taxes, shipping/duty charges, or any other penalties the vendor assesses. It's Canadian consumer law.
"All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

[/Korth]