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Cinebench R23 CPU voltages vs Gaming CPU Voltage. Why are they so different?

Maximus_Hero_VI
Level 7

Can someone explain to me why my 14900k voltages while running Cinebench R23 sit around 1.12V with temps in the 60-70C. But while playing a game like BFV my voltages are around 1.35V with temps sitting around 40-50C.

So CinebenchR23 = 1.12V, 60-70C 5100 Core clock 

BFV = 1.35V, 40-50C 5700 Core clock.

Seems funny to me how this is working. What am I suppose to use for an example when ever I under volt or overclock my CPU?

CinebenchR23 HWINFO

Cinebench R23.png

BFV HWINFO Pic

BFV.png

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3 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions

Hopper64
Level 15

It’s the difference between a stress test and a game. You aren’t necessarily using all cores all the time in a game, but a stress test like CB uses all cores and your CPU must downclock to accommodate the temperature generated. You are going to see a corresponding decrease in voltage as well. Looks pretty normal to me. Other folks will look over your data to give you an opinion as well.

MZ790A Bios 2002, GSkill F5-8000J3848H16GX2-TZRK, 13900KS, EKWB D5 TBE 300, Seasonic Prime TX-1600 ATX 3.0, Asus Strix 4090 w/ Optimus block, Phanteks Enthoo Elite, Asus Claymore 2, Asus Gladius 3, Asus XG349C, Samsung 990, Windows 11 Pro

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Silent_Scone
Super Moderator

Hi @Maximus_Hero_VI

 Whilst Battlefield by gaming standards is quite CPU intensive (and utilising some AVX instruction), it doesn't load the CPU nearly enough to introduce vdroop and sticks within the defined TDP limits and thermal constraints.

For more current intensive all-core workloads such as CR20 / CR23, depending on the LLC setting, the CPU will encounter vdroop which is a natural phenomenon that occurs when a circuit is loaded and which is also embraced by engineers as a level of safety for heavy load transitions. Please note that the voltage behaviour under these conditions requires the correct measuring equipment and cannot be observed correctly in software.

13900KS / 8000 CAS36 / ROG APEX Z790 / ROG TUF RTX 4090

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Vynra
Level 12

everyone who commented above is correct but ill summarize in easier terms

gaming= low load so you get higher vcore/voltage

stress tests/all core workloads= high load so you get lower voltage/vcore

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5 REPLIES 5

Hopper64
Level 15

It’s the difference between a stress test and a game. You aren’t necessarily using all cores all the time in a game, but a stress test like CB uses all cores and your CPU must downclock to accommodate the temperature generated. You are going to see a corresponding decrease in voltage as well. Looks pretty normal to me. Other folks will look over your data to give you an opinion as well.

MZ790A Bios 2002, GSkill F5-8000J3848H16GX2-TZRK, 13900KS, EKWB D5 TBE 300, Seasonic Prime TX-1600 ATX 3.0, Asus Strix 4090 w/ Optimus block, Phanteks Enthoo Elite, Asus Claymore 2, Asus Gladius 3, Asus XG349C, Samsung 990, Windows 11 Pro

Silent_Scone
Super Moderator

Hi @Maximus_Hero_VI

 Whilst Battlefield by gaming standards is quite CPU intensive (and utilising some AVX instruction), it doesn't load the CPU nearly enough to introduce vdroop and sticks within the defined TDP limits and thermal constraints.

For more current intensive all-core workloads such as CR20 / CR23, depending on the LLC setting, the CPU will encounter vdroop which is a natural phenomenon that occurs when a circuit is loaded and which is also embraced by engineers as a level of safety for heavy load transitions. Please note that the voltage behaviour under these conditions requires the correct measuring equipment and cannot be observed correctly in software.

13900KS / 8000 CAS36 / ROG APEX Z790 / ROG TUF RTX 4090

Vynra
Level 12

everyone who commented above is correct but ill summarize in easier terms

gaming= low load so you get higher vcore/voltage

stress tests/all core workloads= high load so you get lower voltage/vcore

Maximus_Hero_VI
Level 7

Thanks these were all great comments. So am I to assume that if i locked my cores at 5.7Ghz and my voltage at 1.35V (assuming it was stable), that I would get massive temps when running CinebenchR23?

If you could, yes, but a "fixed" Vcore is still subject to Vdroop, which you want. How much depends on the applied LLC setting. A higher LLC is directly designed to counteract the effects of vdroop.

If the LLC setting is too close to the applied voltage and there is next to no vdroop a circuit can encounter overshoot (voltage beyond the desired voltage), which as above, you won't be able to see without the correct monitoring equipment. Also, the current levels the CPU would be subjected to would saturate cooling so fast that the CPU would throttle or potentially degrade very quickly.

13900KS / 8000 CAS36 / ROG APEX Z790 / ROG TUF RTX 4090