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Samsung 990 Pro & 980 Pro problems

GEEKCPA
Level 8
I have 2 990 Pro's in RAID 0 mounted in my Z790 Hero's Hyper M.2 card in the last PCIe slot on the MB. The 990's are also my Windows boot disk. I also have 2 980 Pro's in the onboard slots M.2_2 and M.2_3 in RAID 0. Crystaldisk info shows all 4 disks have 100% life remaining. This is a new system and the 990's only have 1915 GB written to them, the 980's have approx 900 GB written to them. I don't know if this amount of GB written is enough to degrade the health status of either volume.

The firmware version of the 990's is 0B2QJXD7 which I think is the original firmware. The 980's firmware is 5B2QGXA7 which I believe is the "safe" version.


I am wondering if perhaps the fact both volumes are in RAID 0 might somehow protect the drives from the health degradation that has been brought up as an issue with these Samsung drives. I'd rather not have to resort to upgrading the firmware on the 990's as I'd have to break the RAID array, reinstall Windows on a single drive, upgrade the firmware, re-create the RAID array and re-install Windows again--a giant headache I'd rather avoid. I'm leaning in the direction of just running as-is until I see declining drive health then go through the firmware upgrade nightmare. I do have a USB recovery stick, so that may make the Windows re-install a little less onerous.

Your thoughts on what is the best way to deal with the Samsung nightmare?
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2 REPLIES 2

Kashargul
Level 8
You don't need to install windows on a single drive to update the firmware. Download the firmware update ISO and create a bootable USB stick. The problem is, that even then you'd have to break your raid once. I've decided to break all my raids and update the firmware of the drives not to risk anything. A full system backup comes in handy to save some time after recreating the raid.

Another, risky option is to power down your system, remove the M.2s and update them on another PC using the update ISO. Afterwards put them back into the original system in the same slots. That way your raid might persist.

jesswade
Level 8
GEEKCPA wrote:
I have 2 990 Pro's in RAID 0 mounted in my Z790 Hero's Hyper M.2 card in the last PCIe slot on the MB. The 990's are also my Windows boot disk. I also have 2 980 Pro's in the onboard slots M.2_2 and M.2_3 in RAID 0. Crystaldisk info shows all 4 disks have 100% life remaining. This is a new system and the 990's only have 1915 GB written to them, the 980's have approx 900 GB written to them. I don't know if this amount of GB written is enough to degrade the health status of either volume.

The firmware version of the 990's is 0B2QJXD7 which I think is the original firmware. The 980's firmware is 5B2QGXA7 which I believe is the "safe" version.


I am wondering if perhaps the fact both volumes are in RAID 0 might somehow protect the drives from the health degradation that has been brought up as an issue with these Samsung drives. I'd rather not have to resort to upgrading the firmware on the 990's as I'd have to break the RAID array, reinstall Windows on a single drive, upgrade the firmware, re-create the RAID array and re-install Windows again--a giant headache I'd rather avoid. I'm leaning in the direction of just running as-is until I see declining drive health then go through the firmware upgrade nightmare. I do have a USB recovery stick, so that may make the Windows re-install a little less onerous.

Your thoughts on what is the best way to deal with the Samsung nightmare?


it seems like your SSDs are still in good health with 100% life remaining. The amount of data written to the drives is relatively low, so it's unlikely that it has significantly impacted their health status.

Regarding the firmware versions, it's generally recommended to keep your firmware up to date to ensure optimal performance and stability. You may want to check with the manufacturer's website to see if there are any firmware updates available for your SSDs.

Overall, it seems like you have a high-performance storage setup, but it's important to keep an eye on your SSD health and firmware updates to ensure continued performance and reliability.