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Motherboard Name, labeling

CAYAtion
Level 8
Hi everyone!!

I have some Issues with the new labeling (or naming) of the mainboards. I used the search function, because there was once a thread about the meaning of all this labels. But I cant find it, so I hope you guys can Help me sort it out.

So I found this page: https://www.techpowerup.com/237490/asus-motherboard-segmentation-explained-prime-series-takes-backse...

According to that image, we have the following main sections:
TUF Gaming----> Entry gamers
PRIME-------------> Professionals, and All-round builders
ROG STRIXX----> Core gamers (what is a core gamer: https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Core%20gamer)
ROG---------------> Hardcore gamers and enthusiasts

My first question: Does that mean, Prime is made of better quality then ROG? Because it is also for professionals?

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Well now comes the confusing part, ROG and ROG STRIXX have additional labelings.
For ROG they are first supdivided into:
Zenith--------> For AMD RYZEN THREADRIPPER processors, TR4 socket
Crosshair---> For AMD RYZEN processors, AM4 and older sockets
Rampage---> For INTEL i processors, 2011-v3 and 2066 and older sockets
Maximus---> For INTEL i processors, 1151 and older sockets

And additionally to that, they get the following extra label:
Ranger -->
Hero -->
Formula -->
Impact -->
Gene -->
Extreme -->
Code -->
Apex -->

Therefore my second question is: What do these second labels stand for?

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For ROG STRIXX:
Strix-E --> (topmost)
Strix-F --> (second-best)
Strix-G --> (micro-ATX)
Strix-H --> (entry ATX)
Strix-I --> (mini-ITX)

This would make sence, if no XE version would exist: https://www.asus.com/Motherboards/ROG-STRIX-X299-XE-GAMING/
So what does XE mean?

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In the end, if ever anyone from ASUS reads this, please make a clearer naming of your motherboards, I'm completely lost.

Thanks for your help!
CAYAtion
76,200 Views
15 REPLIES 15

Korth
Level 14
ASUS marketing has changed (and keeps changing) their naming schemes as they attempt to refine product lines and counter competitor offerings.

So last-year's ASUS stuff won't necessarily conform with the naming schemes on this-year's ASUS stuff. And discrepencies increase the further back you go. But as it stands now, in general:

PRIME = ASUS "mainstream" brand, all the basic models with all the proven tech, the ASUS brand intended to appeal to generic consumers/businesses/etc
ROG = ASUS "Republic of Gamers" brand, full-featured with all the latest ASUS innovations, intended to appeal to gamers/overclockers/enthusiasts/powerusers/etc
STRIX = subset of ROG, now basically ASUS "budget gamer" brand, not as loaded with toys but designed to deliver "best game for the buck", less complex, less costly
TUF = hybrid of PRIME/ROG, emphasis is on durability/reliability/longevity, once sort of "everyman's server-grade", now basically "robust/indestructible" STRIX gaming, costs more


(PRIME stuff)

A = basic model, basic features, basic price
DELUXE = better model, does more, costs more
PRO = best model
WS = workstation/HEDT model


(ROG stuff)

CROSSHAIR = AMD mainstream platforms
ZENITH = AMD HEDT (ThreadRipper) platforms
MAXIMUS = Intel mainstream platforms
RAMPAGE = Intel HEDT platforms

RANGER = entry-level model, stripped down, if present at all then usually released long after HERO
HERO = basic model with all the basic frills, always the first release
CODE = better model with more overclocking and toys
FORMULA = "best" model with most overclocking and toys, sometimes released alongside CODE, sometimes long after
EXTREME = "very best" model with all of everything, usually released long after FORMULA, sometimes not at all ("EXTREME" currently in use on some other product)
APEX = "overclocking" model, sort of like a CODE with FORMULA parts, everything which doesn't add speed is stripped out, usually released "early" because ASUS wants to proudly advertise a new board which breaks all the "world record overclocks" and demonstrates superiority over competition.


GENE, IMPACT, ASSEMBLY, AURA, WIFI, etc have all been used to indicate different variants/editions/features, but I wouldn't consider them "families" because they're usually limited to one or two products which ASUS has decided to discontinue. They repurpose their names from time to time, they sometimes turn a popular "one-off" name (like STRIX) into a full product line, they sometimes repurpose and "reinvent" less-popular names (like TUF) into something else.
"All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

[/Korth]

Thank you for your input 😄

Korth wrote:
ASUS marketing has changed (and keeps changing) their naming schemes as they attempt to refine product lines and counter competitor offerings.

So last-year's ASUS stuff won't necessarily conform with the naming schemes on this-year's ASUS stuff. And discrepencies increase the further back you go. But as it stands now, in general


That is true, you are right. For example when I bought my ASUS Mainboard extreme was the best one. Nowdays it is still at the top, but not the very best.

Korth wrote:
GENE, IMPACT, ASSEMBLY, AURA, WIFI, etc have all been used to indicate different variants/editions/features, but I wouldn't consider them "families" because they're usually limited to one or two products which ASUS has decided to discontinue. They repurpose their names from time to time, they sometimes turn a popular "one-off" name (like STRIX) into a full product line, they sometimes repurpose and "reinvent" less-popular names (like TUF) into something else.


I think these are quite interesting facts. Probably you were right, that CODE not only has additional wifi and Bluetooth. I will adjust that one.

Korth
Level 14
MAXIMUS X CODE has wifi, so did MAXIMUS IX CODE. MAXIMUS VIII did not. It seems these days that WIFI is part of the mobo designation only when two variants exist (like HERO vs HERO WIFI, etc) or when wifi is a feature ASUS wants to explicitly announce to sell the mobo (like STRIX WIFI, etc).

I'm curious why these questions? I mean, you select from the mobos which have the capabilities and features you want, you don't select from the ones which lack them. There doesn't seem to be a lot to be gained from tracking every possible mobo model/variant ASUS (or any other OEM) releases ... they come and go and get revised and changed around too regularly ... and ASUS (or any other OEM, or Intel, or AMD, or NVIDIA, etc) could announce new platform designations any time.
"All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

[/Korth]

Korth wrote:
MAXIMUS X CODE has wifi, so did MAXIMUS IX CODE. MAXIMUS VIII did not. It seems these days that WIFI is part of the mobo designation only when two variants exist (like HERO vs HERO WIFI, etc) or when wifi is a feature ASUS wants to explicitly announce to sell the mobo (like STRIX WIFI, etc).

I'm curious why these questions? I mean, you select from the mobos which have the capabilities and features you want, you don't select from the ones which lack them. There doesn't seem to be a lot to be gained from tracking every possible mobo model/variant ASUS (or any other OEM) releases ... they come and go and get revised and changed around too regularly ... and ASUS (or any other OEM, or Intel, or AMD, or NVIDIA, etc) could announce new platform designations any time.


Absolutely true. If you want to say it is unnecessary to do that, I cant disagree in any logical way. But this is more about passion or hobby 🙂
For example in another brand (for example grafic cards from nvidia) it is very obvious what the different names stand for, and which one is probably superior to the other.
ASUS used these names since I first bought my ASUS mainboard which is quiet a long time ago. Therefore I think we can safely assume the labeling or naming scheme will be continued for the time being.

For example I learned that an extreme suits my needs much better than an apex. Even though the spec of the apex look better for me. Which means I would have bought the wrong Mobo before this Discussion.

Korth
Level 14
Specs are not always entirely truthful. They seem to be rewritten by marketing. That fancy new APEX mobo might be able to overclock 5GHz and address 128GB RAM and support DDR-4266 ... but not all at the same time, lol, not even without aggressively binning all of your parts (including the motherboard itself!).
"All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

[/Korth]

Reigngrifth
Level 7

where does the Strix-A fit in this stack? 🙂