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Rear i/o detecting headphones as speakers

Wocking
Level 8

I have the b650e-f gaming wifi motherboard and it detects headphones as speakers, unlike my last rog strix mb, which means I can't use surround sound and I would assume has other general audio disadvantages. Asus told me to send it in for warranty but that would mean reassembling the entire pc. Has anyone else run into this problem?

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Accepted Solutions

achugh
Level 12

Hi @Wocking your motherboard uses the newer ALC4080 audio chipset. See the difference between the old and new at https://www.igorslab.de/en/the-old-alc4080-on-the-new-intel-boards-demystified-and-the-differences-f...

This new chipset works differently and the hardware is wired correctly with frontpanel only configured as Headphones and the REAR OUTS as Speakers. Only the frontpanel will use the built-in amplifier so your sound out level will be higher compared to REAR as that is meant to go into an external amplifier.

Some of these details and the issues with this chipset is what I am discussing in my post at https://rog-forum.asus.com/t5/gaming-motherboards/can-asus-support-fix-realtek-audio-drivers-with-bo... where you can read about my challenges with ALC4082 on Z790 DARK HERO motherboard.

Hope this helps.

Disclaimer: I am not an ASUS support person so my information may be incomplete. Always follow official documentation and material provided by ASUS representatives.

INTEL i9-14900K / CORSAIR VENGEANCE RGB 192GB (4x48GB) 5200 CAS38 / ROG Z790 DARK HERO / ROG TUF GAMING RTX 4090 OC / ProArt PA-602 Case / SEASONIC PRIME TX-1300 ATX 3.0 / CORSAIR MP700 PRO 2TB PCIe Gen5 / CRUCIAL T500 2TB PCIe Gen4 / EIZO CG2700X

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7 REPLIES 7

MasterC
Community Admin
Community Admin

I assume you are connecting a headset to the green 3.5 mm jack at the back of the motherboard, correct? Those 3 jacks (green, orange, black) are for 5.1 surround speakers (6 channels).

MasterC_0-1718772585775.png

Have you hooked up the front panel audio (AAFP)? Tried that instead?

MasterC_1-1718772768276.png


Can you not switch to headphones? Or can you not enable virtual surround? 

Is sound coming out of the headset?

_____________________________________________________________
FPS, Racing, and VR Gamer / Tech Enthusiast / ROG Admin

Yeah, the front panel defaults to headphones instead of speakers, but I get a lot of problems from the front panel such as the audio just cutting out. When using them as headphones I can also activate virtual surround sound, unlike speakers. When used as speakers they do make clear sound but imaging and spatial audio is noticeably better when used as headphones. So far I have narrowed my issue down to "connector retasting." For some reason it doesn't work like my last rog strix board.

Wocking_1-1718841002726.png

On my other pc I get a notification when connecting to an analog jack and there is an option to change it (like the blue jack in my screenshot).

 

achugh
Level 12

Hi @Wocking your motherboard uses the newer ALC4080 audio chipset. See the difference between the old and new at https://www.igorslab.de/en/the-old-alc4080-on-the-new-intel-boards-demystified-and-the-differences-f...

This new chipset works differently and the hardware is wired correctly with frontpanel only configured as Headphones and the REAR OUTS as Speakers. Only the frontpanel will use the built-in amplifier so your sound out level will be higher compared to REAR as that is meant to go into an external amplifier.

Some of these details and the issues with this chipset is what I am discussing in my post at https://rog-forum.asus.com/t5/gaming-motherboards/can-asus-support-fix-realtek-audio-drivers-with-bo... where you can read about my challenges with ALC4082 on Z790 DARK HERO motherboard.

Hope this helps.

Disclaimer: I am not an ASUS support person so my information may be incomplete. Always follow official documentation and material provided by ASUS representatives.

INTEL i9-14900K / CORSAIR VENGEANCE RGB 192GB (4x48GB) 5200 CAS38 / ROG Z790 DARK HERO / ROG TUF GAMING RTX 4090 OC / ProArt PA-602 Case / SEASONIC PRIME TX-1300 ATX 3.0 / CORSAIR MP700 PRO 2TB PCIe Gen5 / CRUCIAL T500 2TB PCIe Gen4 / EIZO CG2700X

Thank you so much. I wish customer support was as helpful as you. Do you think I could solve my problem with an external DAC? The front panel has a static noise that I can't figure out so I was hoping I could somehow remap the back panel?

achugh
Level 12

Hi@Wocking, I am not sure about your setup but I will share some general information which I have personally faced and solved hoping this will help you out. Anything, more will require me and others here on the forum to get a better understanding of your setup to help you better.

The REAR Speaker Out connection is typically meant to go into an external amplifier and that is ONLY needed if you feel your volume level in your headphone is lower than what you like at 100 level value or the maximum value Windows will allow. So, the answer to your 1st question is YES only if you feel the headphones are not loud enough for you at maximum value.

Now, the front panel connector has impedance sensing and a headphone amplifier. Impedance sensing means that your sound in terms of lower frequencies is not going to be artificially boosted or reduced as you connect different headphones from different manufactures. Each headphone provides a different level of impedance or resistance in a more layman terms. The more resistance it provides, the more current you need to make the same level of sound at a given frequency. This is what your headphone amplifier is trying to do for you so you don't have to buy an external headphone amplifier. Some of the more expensive headphones have impedance around 200-600 Ohms; while headphones meant to be used with mobile devices typically have lower impedance in the range from 14-60 Ohms. This is because mobile devices do not have enough battery or current to power the expensive headset hence when you read about the setup of expensive headsets, they always require an external headphone amplifier.

I am going to make a very basic assumption that your headset is not expensive and the current headphone amplifier in your motherboard is more than sufficient to power them properly. So let us focus on your issue with the front panel connector usage. You mentioned that you are hearing static noise in them.

The most common cause of the front panel connector having static noise or any type of noise in the headphone is because your front panel cable going into the motherboard is touching power cables coming from your power supply unit. This is where it gets very tricky because it now comes down to how well you can adjusting your cabling within your case so that your power cables and your front panel connector cable stay as far away from each other.

I have an older case from Lian-Li (EATX case). This case is huge and my front panel cable is routed in a way where I cannot get it positioned in a way to avoid this static noise.

My current or new case I built less than 3 months ago is ASUS ProArt PA-602 which an ATX case. Because this case is not as big as my older case, and it has slightly longer front panel cable, I am able to route this cable in a way to keep it away from the power cables. I can also confirm that when I started with this new case I had the same static noise as you.

HOW TO CONFIRM YOUR STATIC NOISE IS DUE TO CABLING

  1. If you have your cable tied up so that you do not have a cable mess in your case, first separate the front panel audio cable from the rest of them so it is lose and independent.
  2. Now connect your headphones to the front panel connector and max out the Windows Headphone Volume. Maxing out the headphone volume makes it easy to hear the static noise.
  3. Now start moving the front panel Audio Cable away from rest of the cables. The best way to explain is, you pull the cable towards you or away and out from the case and you HOLD it in your hand as you move this cable towards you.
    1. As you move this cable around, you will hear the static noise change. Sometimes getting louder and sometimes getting weaker.
    2. If your static noise changes, this confirms that the problem is not in the hardware but it is in the cable routing.
      1. Basically, it proves that the HD Audio Front Panel cable is picking up electronic interference signal from the other cables (typically power cables) around it.
      2. While the Front Panel HD Audio cable is typically shielded on newer cases, I cannot say the same for older case. This is why I am not able to get rid of this noise on my older case from 2009 as I believe that cable is not shielded but I am able to get rid of this noise on my newer case from 2024 as this cable is shielded.
      3. Please keep in mind that while shielded cable helps, it cannot fully shield the strong electrical interference signal. Hence, when you tie the cable along with power cable the shielding is not sufficient and we all hear this static noise because the cable are too close.
      4. If you have ever opened an expensive electronic device, you will see that it has lots of special shielding around various electronic parts to keep the digital signal clean. That is what we are trying to do here.
    3. Now assuming your problem is with the position or routing of the cable, there is no one here on the forum that can very easily help unless they have the exact same case as yours and the exact same motherboard ideally. It is exact same case that will be more important.
      1. Once you find someone with the same case and they have spent hours finding out the best way to route the Front panel HD Audio cable to avoid this noise, then they can give you exact guidance on what you need to do to solve your problem. Otherwise, the general advice I and anyone else can give you is for you to play around with the cable ties and how this cable goes from Point A (front panel) to Point B (motherboard Audio Connector).
    4. Regarding cable routing the only other information I can share is if your routing requires you to go over the power cable(s), you want to have this area where the two cables meet as short as possible. This typically means you have a 90 degrees path like + sign where say your power cable is going vertically from TOP to BOTTOM and your HD Audio cable is going horizontally like from LEFT to RIGHT so the point of intersection is the very small. Also having a 90 degree intersection gives you least electronic interference due to all the electromagnetic mathematics that happens in the real world.
      1. My case is not a perfect 90 degree but I got it as close as my case and cable allow and I have it very well zip tied so this angle does not change. 
      2. With this setup my static noise went from very noticeable to something I cannot even decern with my ears at 100 Volume on the headphones using my Sony MDR-XB950 headset (or any wired headset I have tried). This Sony Headset has 32 Ohms of impedance which is the most common value for cheap headset (under $100 when I purchased about 15 years ago) meant to be used with mobile devices.

I wish you luck in your journey to adjust your cables in your case and I hope this information will help you solve your problem without buying anything else as it is the cheapest solution for all of us.

NOTE: If you have a cheap case which does not have a shielded HD Audio cable all your efforts will only reduce the level of static noise. It will not fully remove it as is the case for my older case when cables were not shielded.

Disclaimer: I am not an ASUS support person so my information may be incomplete. Always follow official documentation and material provided by ASUS representatives.

INTEL i9-14900K / CORSAIR VENGEANCE RGB 192GB (4x48GB) 5200 CAS38 / ROG Z790 DARK HERO / ROG TUF GAMING RTX 4090 OC / ProArt PA-602 Case / SEASONIC PRIME TX-1300 ATX 3.0 / CORSAIR MP700 PRO 2TB PCIe Gen5 / CRUCIAL T500 2TB PCIe Gen4 / EIZO CG2700X

Wocking
Level 8

Sorry for the late reply, I had been away on vacation. The weird thing about the static is that it only happened during certain actions or in certain applications. Sometimes it would also come on and off for a couple hours at a time. I don’t know why it is so inconsistent but I am almost certain that the noise originated due to interference from the power supply as you said. After moving the cable away from the power supply, the noise was lessened substantially I still hear it occasionally. I’ll take your advice and try re-routing the audio cable away from  at a 90 degree angle to the power supply. Hopefully that fixes it completely because my case/cables should not be a limitation. Also, your responses have saved me so much time and anxiety. Finding you was the jackpot!

Hi @Wocking , I am glad I was able to help you out. Just like you, I have spent numerous hours trying figure out these electronic interferences.

On my older case with unshielded cables, I have the exact same situation where the front panel headphone connection will only make static sound when I use the scroll wheel of my mouse. I use Logitech MX705 USB Wireless Mouse. I am not sure if it is the wireless/bluetooth signal that interferes with the power signal that causes this static or the signal that goes to the USB port. Just like you, I have significantly reduce this noise but cannot get rid of it.

On my newer case, I am able to fully get rid of this noise and I attribute it to the shielded cables of my case. FYI, I am using ASUS ProArt PA602 as my case on the newer build.

Good luck with your cable re-routing!

Disclaimer: I am not an ASUS support person so my information may be incomplete. Always follow official documentation and material provided by ASUS representatives.

INTEL i9-14900K / CORSAIR VENGEANCE RGB 192GB (4x48GB) 5200 CAS38 / ROG Z790 DARK HERO / ROG TUF GAMING RTX 4090 OC / ProArt PA-602 Case / SEASONIC PRIME TX-1300 ATX 3.0 / CORSAIR MP700 PRO 2TB PCIe Gen5 / CRUCIAL T500 2TB PCIe Gen4 / EIZO CG2700X