cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

[DRIVERS] Intel Chipset/MEI/SATA (1xx/2xx/3xx/4xx/5xx)

MoKiChU
Level 40

Hi everyone,

- Intel Chipset Drivers :

Package : 10.1.19627.8423 WHQL [28/09/2023]
Download : Link

Install/Update Process :

Launch "CHIPSET_Intel_vxx.x.xxxxx.xxxx.exe"

- Intel MEI Drivers (Drivers Only) :

Drivers : 2406.5.5.0 WHQL [08/02/2024]
DAL SoftwareComponent Driver : 1.44.2023.710 WHQL [11/07/2023]
ICLS SoftwareComponent Driver : 1.71.99.0 WHQL [06/12/2023]
WMI SoftwareComponent Driver : 2408.5.4.0 WHQL [21/02/2024]
Download : Link
 
Install/Update Process :

Launch "Install.cmd" by right-click Run as admin > Automatic restart when install is done

- Intel SATA AHCI-RAID Drivers (Drivers Only) :

Drivers - 4xx/5xx : 18.37.7.1013 WHQL [06/02/2023]
Drivers - 2xx/3xx : 17.11.3.1010 WHQL [25/11/2022]
Drivers - 1xx : 16.8.5.1014 WHQL [13/12/2022]
Download - 4xx/5xx : Link
Download - 2xx/3xx : Link
Download - 1xx : Link

Install/Update Process :

- Press Windows key + X > Device Manager > Right-click on your Intel SATA device > Update driver > Browse my computer for driver software
- Browse... > Select the extracted drivers folder (SATA_AHCI-RAID_Intel_v...) > Next


OS requirements : Windows 10 64 bit or more recent.
Hardware requirements : Motherboards with Intel 1xx/2xx/3xx/4xx/5xx series chipsets (except Intel X299 chipset).


TIPS :

If you want to manage the drivers (remove old/unused drivers for example) that you have in your Windows DriverStore
Use Driver Store Explorer (Right click on "Rapr.exe" > Run as administrator).

If you want better interrupts delivery latency
Enable MSI (Message Signaled-based Interrupts) mode on all your supported devices (see the column "supported modes") with
MSI Mode Utility (Right click on "MSI_Mode_Utility_v3.exe" > Run as administrator).
543,045 Views
759 REPLIES 759

piratino wrote:
Thank you so much.

I have some doubts on which I'm using now. I have also some issues now in understanding what AHCI is and if I'm using it (or need it?!?).
I am not using any RAID, so if I have understood clearly, the SATA driver iaStorAC.inf is not needed in any case (mine and every other users) that does not use any RAID..correct?

I have an Intel NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSD, but you say to disable the SATA controller and uninstall the SATA driver...but at the end you say that "Only Intel NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs (via SATA RAID drivers in NVMe mode) .... have drivers dedicated to its controller".
So what does this exactly means? Do I have to uninstall the drivers for SATA controller and install some dedicated Intel NVMe PCIe 3.0 drivers, or that in this case I have to use the SATA iaStorAC.inf driver?

Sorry for the confirmations I'm asking, but this thing it is absolutely not explained by the manufacturers.

Thanks!


The answers to your questions are in my previous answers, I also told you in detail what to do in my previous answers ... Please read more carefully.

MoKiChU wrote:
The answers to your questions are in my previous answers, I also told you in detail what to do in my previous answers ... Please read more carefully.


I'm sorry...I am asking further questions as I was not getting your answers as for me this is totally new and mind-blowing.

Let me be more specific:

MoKiChU wrote:

If you are using one or more SATA HDD/SSHD/SSD in AHCI mode : You need to have your SATA controller active (AHCI mode).
If you are using one or more SATA HDD/SSHD/SSD in RAID/RST Premium mode (with/without Optane) : You need to have your SATA controller active (RAID mode).
If you use neither : You can disable your SATA controller.

So you can disable your SATA controller only if you only have NVMe SSDs (what is your case), and in this case, communication is done via PCIe lines (it is precisely the principle and the strength of NVMe compared to SATA).


In bios I have never disabled anything.

I do not use RAID or have any Optane drive installed, so the "iaStorAC.inf" driver is useless, right? Is this the exact reason why it should be uninstalled?

Regarding AHCI, why do I not use it? Is it because AHCI is useless when having NVMe drives as communication is done via PCIe lines? Is this the reason why "iaAHCIC.inf" should be uninstalled?

Summing up, having all NVMe drives and no RAID should imply that the SATA controller and AHCI can never be used and so disabled in bios and never install their drivers?


Regarding the other aspect fo your explanation here:
MoKiChU wrote:

Only Intel NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs (via SATA RAID drivers in NVMe mode) & Samsung NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs (via Samsung NVMe drivers) have drivers dedicated to its controller, most of all others NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs don't have drivers dedicated to its controller. To date, no NVMe PCIe 4.0 SSD has drivers dedicated to its controller (even Samsung 980 PRO NVMe PCIe 4.0 SSD don't have drivers dedicated to its controller), the drivers Microsoft Standard NVMe built-in drivers must be used.


When you say "Only Intel NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs (via SATA RAID drivers in NVMe mode) & Samsung NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs (via Samsung NVMe drivers) have drivers dedicated to its controller" you specifically stand that extra dedicated drivers are needed only if using SATA RAID functionality with an Intel (or Samsung) PCIe 3.0 NVMe drive, as if using SATA RAID with PCIe 4.0 drives it can be used the standard Microsoft built-in driver, right?


I'm sorry but I shall need extra confirmation as I have several machines where I have NVMe drives with no RAID and keeping on installing SATA and AHCI drivers.
Thank you.

piratino wrote:
I do not use RAID or have any Optane drive installed, so the "iaStorAC.inf" driver is useless, right?

Is this the exact reason why it should be uninstalled?


Wrong, again, you haven't read carefully :

MoKiChU wrote:
...
- Remove the old version from 17.9 drivers branch of the SATA RAID/Optane drivers (iastorac.inf).
- You still need the current version from 18.3x drivers branch of the SATA RAID/Optane drivers (iastorac.inf) used in NVMe mode for your Intel NVMe SSD.
...


piratino wrote:
Regarding AHCI, why do I not use it? Is it because AHCI is useless when having NVMe drives as communication is done via PCIe lines?


Correct.


piratino wrote:
Is this the reason why "iaAHCIC.inf" should be uninstalled?


Only if you disable your SATA controller :

MoKiChU wrote:
Once your SATA controller is disabled in your BIOS :

- Remove all versions of the SATA AHCI drivers (iaahcic.inf).

You don't have to disable your SATA controller, it's just optimization, you can if you want leave your SATA controller active, even if you are not using it, and in this case you only need to remove the old version from 17.9 drivers branch of the SATA AHCI drivers (iaahcic.inf).


piratino wrote:
Summing up, having all NVMe drives and no RAID should imply that the SATA controller and AHCI can never be used and so disabled in bios


Correct.


piratino wrote:
and never install their drivers?


Correct but not in your case. I repeat that you still need "the SATA RAID/Optane drivers (iastorac.inf) used in NVMe mode for your Intel NVMe SSD".


piratino wrote:
Regarding the other aspect fo your explanation here :

When you say "Only Intel NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs (via SATA RAID drivers in NVMe mode) & Samsung NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs (via Samsung NVMe drivers) have drivers dedicated to its controller" you specifically stand that extra dedicated drivers are needed only if using SATA RAID functionality with an Intel (or Samsung) PCIe 3.0 NVMe drive, as if using SATA RAID with PCIe 4.0 drives it can be used the standard Microsoft built-in driver, right?

I'm sorry but I shall need extra confirmation as I have several machines where I have NVMe drives with no RAID and keeping on installing SATA and AHCI drivers.
Thank you.


Do not mix everything up, SATA RAID and NVMe have nothing to do (except in the specific case of an Intel Optane).

The thing that seems to mislead you and that you don't seem to understand is that Intel has decided not to create dedicated Intel NVMe drivers for its NVMe SSDs, and therefore SATA RAID Drivers = Intel NVMe Drivers (hence, "SATA RAID drivers in NVMe mode").

MoKiChU wrote:
Wrong, again, you haven't read carefully :





Correct.




Only if you disable your SATA controller :


You don't have to disable your SATA controller, it's just optimization, you can if you want leave your SATA controller active, even if you are not using it, and in this case you only need to remove the old version from 17.9 drivers branch of the SATA AHCI drivers (iaahcic.inf).




Correct.




Correct but not in your case. I repeat that you still need "the SATA RAID/Optane drivers (iastorac.inf) used in NVMe mode for your Intel NVMe SSD".




Do not mix everything up, SATA RAID and NVMe have nothing to do (except in the specific case of an Intel Optane).

The thing that seems to mislead you and that you don't seem to understand is that Intel has decided not to create dedicated Intel NVMe drivers for its NVMe SSDs, and therefore SATA RAID Drivers = Intel NVMe Drivers (hence, "SATA RAID drivers in NVMe mode").


Now it is perfectly clear. At the end you center the issue in my case, as I was indeed mislead about this SATA/Intel driver's thing.

For optimization I like my self to have active/installed only what is used. I'll try to disable the SATA controller and remove the SATA AHCI drivers (iaAHCIC.inf), and of course keep the SATA RAID/Optane drivers (iastorac.inf) as used by my Intel NVMe drive.

The curious thing is that I will keep a driver installed even if the intended hardware for which it should be installed is disabled (SATA controller), as it is used by another hardware (Intel NVMe drive).

Again, you are very nice and thank you so so much.

MoKiChU wrote:

....


Quick question regarding SATA controller: in case of having a classic sata hdd attached to one of the sata connectors to the motherboard, placed as an extra storage next to the NVMe dedicated to Windows, would this hdd need to have the SATA controller active in bios so for it to regularly be seen by Windows at boot?

I haven't tried to disable the SATA controller in this machine to see if the hdd doesn't show up at boot, as I have some tasks on that disk ruining at startup that is a bit complicated to pause, so sorry for maybe asking a silly and rather easy question to check my self.

Thank you.

piratino wrote:
Quick question regarding SATA controller: in case of having a classic sata hdd attached to one of the sata connectors to the motherboard, placed as an extra storage next to the NVMe dedicated to Windows, would this hdd need to have the SATA controller active in bios so for it to regularly be seen by Windows at boot?

I haven't tried to disable the SATA controller in this machine to see if the hdd doesn't show up at boot, as I have some tasks on that disk ruining at startup that is a bit complicated to pause, so sorry for maybe asking a silly and rather easy question to check my self.

Thank you.


Hi,

If an SATA HDD is used, of course, SATA controller must keeped enabled (and therefore the SATA AHCI drivers is needed).

MoKiChU
Level 40
Hi everyone,

- Intel SATA AHCI-RAID Drivers (Drivers Only) :
Drivers - 1xx*/2xx/3xx : 17.9.5.1018 WHQL [10/11/2020]
Download - 1xx*/2xx/3xx : Link


* Only some chipsets from the series are supported.



Thread updated.

MoKiChU
Level 40
Hi everyone,

- Intel MEI Drivers (Drivers Only) :
Drivers : 2108.100.0.1053 WHQL [16/02/2021]


SoftwareComponent Drivers :

DAL SoftwareComponent Driver : 1.41.2021.121 WHQL [21/01/2021]
ICLS SoftwareComponent Driver : 1.62.321.1 WHQL [17/09/2020]
LMS SoftwareComponent Driver : 2122.0.62.0 WHQL [23/06/2021]


Download : Link



Thread updated.

MoKiChU wrote:
Hi everyone,

- Intel MEI Drivers (Drivers Only) :
Drivers : 2108.100.0.1053 WHQL [16/02/2021]




Download : Link



Thread updated.


Also SATA drivers: Thank you @MoKiChU. STAY WELL!

MoKiChU wrote:
Hi everyone,

- Intel MEI Drivers (Drivers Only) :
Drivers : 2108.100.0.1053 WHQL [16/02/2021]




Download : Link



Thread updated.

Thanks as usual MoKiChU:)
It is important to get the latest from MEI and ME firmware updates, as Intels CSME is an evil thing for the normal consumer(it's actually designed for company admins in mind) as it is a possible hacker attack vector. CSME attacks can even be done on PC's that are turned off.