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[DRIVERS] Intel Chipset/MEI/SATA (1xx/2xx/3xx/4xx/5xx)

MoKiChU
Level 40

Hi everyone,

- Intel Chipset Drivers :

Package : 10.1.19627.8423 WHQL [28/09/2023]
Download : Link

Install/Update Process :

Launch "CHIPSET_Intel_vxx.x.xxxxx.xxxx.exe"

- Intel MEI Drivers (Drivers Only) :

Drivers : 2345.5.3.0 WHQL [08/11/2023]
DAL SoftwareComponent Driver : 1.44.2023.710 WHQL [11/07/2023]
ICLS SoftwareComponent Driver : 1.71.99.0 WHQL [06/12/2023]
WMI SoftwareComponent Driver : 2338.5.1.0 WHQL [20/09/2023]
Download : Link
 
Install/Update Process :

Launch "Install.cmd" by right-click Run as admin > Automatic restart when install is done

- Intel SATA AHCI-RAID Drivers (Drivers Only) :

Drivers - 4xx/5xx : 18.37.7.1013 WHQL [06/02/2023]
Drivers - 2xx/3xx : 17.11.3.1010 WHQL [25/11/2022]
Drivers - 1xx : 16.8.5.1014 WHQL [13/12/2022]
Download - 4xx/5xx : Link
Download - 2xx/3xx : Link
Download - 1xx : Link

Install/Update Process :

- Press Windows key + X > Device Manager > Right-click on your Intel SATA device > Update driver > Browse my computer for driver software
- Browse... > Select the extracted drivers folder (SATA_AHCI-RAID_Intel_v...) > Next


OS requirements : Windows 10 64 bit or more recent.
Hardware requirements : Motherboards with Intel 1xx/2xx/3xx/4xx/5xx series chipsets (except Intel X299 chipset).


TIPS :

If you want to manage the drivers (remove old/unused drivers for example) that you have in your Windows DriverStore
Use Driver Store Explorer (Right click on "Rapr.exe" > Run as administrator).

If you want better interrupts delivery latency
Enable MSI (Message Signaled-based Interrupts) mode on all your supported devices (see the column "supported modes") with
MSI Mode Utility (Right click on "MSI_Mode_Utility_v3.exe" > Run as administrator).
256 Views
749 REPLIES 749

MoKiChU wrote:
Hi,

Because the compatibility depends on the Hardware Id of your SATA controller.

The simplest method to adopt, is to install the drivers branch without asterisk for your chipset series (17.7), and to try to go up to the drivers branch above (17.9), if you can install it, try to go up to the drivers branch above (18.3x) and so on ...

Concrete example : the Hardware ID of my Z370 SATA AHCI controller is compatible with the 18.3x drivers branch while the Hardware ID of my friend Z390 SATA AHCI controller is not compatible.


Same for my Z390 Rog Strix. The v17 drivers work fine but not go on the v18. I didn't try actually installing them via the cmd, but unzipped and then tried updating via Browse for Updated Drivers. It said I already the best ones installed, ie. v17

Thanks MoKiChU. That's makes sense. I already have it installed 17.9.xxx I will try 18.3xxx.
Regards

MoKiChU wrote:
Hi,

Because the compatibility depends on the Hardware Id of your SATA controller.

The simplest method to adopt, is to install the drivers branch without asterisk for your chipset series (17.7), and to try to go up to the drivers branch above (17.9), if you can install it, try to go up to the drivers branch above (18.3x) and so on ...

Concrete example : the Hardware ID of my Z370 SATA AHCI controller is compatible with the 18.3x drivers branch while the Hardware ID of my friend Z390 SATA AHCI controller is not compatible.


Hello there and thank you very much for this new update.

Does this case of mine means that my controller is compatible? (see attached image)

Eventually, can I delete the old drivers? Drive Store Explorer didn't recognized any old drivers so in case I should select them manually.


Thank you very much!

MoKiChU
Level 40
piratino wrote:
Hello there and thank you very much for this new update.

Does this case of mine means that my controller is compatible? (see attached image)


Hi,

Yes, your SATA controller is compatible.

piratino wrote:
Eventually, can I delete the old drivers? Drive Store Explorer didn't recognized any old drivers so in case I should select them manually.

Thank you very much!


Yes, you can.

However, I would like to draw everyone's attention to the fact that in a standard and most common configuration, only the SATA AHCI drivers need to be installed. SATA RAID drivers should only be installed if you have configured a RAID (RST Premium) in your BIOS (using Intel Optane or not) or for Intel NVMe SSD.

To avoid any risk of conflict, install only what you need. Here are the drivers you must use depending on the case :

- SATA HDD/SSHD/SSD in AHCI mode : You need Intel SATA AHCI drivers.
- SATA HDD/SSHD/SSD (with/without Intel Optane) in RAID/RST Premium mode : You need Intel SATA RAID/Optane drivers.
- Intel Optane or others Intel NVMe SSD : You need Intel SATA RAID/Optane drivers (used in NVMe mode).
- Samsung NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSD : You need Samsung NVMe drivers : [DRIVERS] Samsung NVMe.
- Samsung NVMe PCIe 4.0 SSD & all others brands NVMe PCIe 3.0/4.0 SSD : You don't need any drivers, Microsoft NVMe built-in drivers will be used.

MoKiChU
Level 40
piratino wrote:
Hello there and thank you very much for this new update.

Does this case of mine means that my controller is compatible? (see attached image)


Hi,

Yes, your SATA controller is compatible with 18.3x drivers branch, but not officially.

piratino wrote:
Eventually, can I delete the old drivers? Drive Store Explorer didn't recognized any old drivers so in case I should select them manually.

Thank you very much!


Yes, you can.

However, I would like to draw everyone's attention to the fact that in a standard and most common configuration, only the SATA AHCI drivers need to be installed. SATA RAID drivers should only be installed if you have configured a RAID (RST Premium) in your BIOS (using Intel Optane or not) or for Intel NVMe SSD.

To avoid any risk of conflict, install only what you need. Here are the drivers you must use depending on the case :

- SATA HDD/SSHD/SSD in AHCI mode : You need Intel SATA AHCI drivers.
- SATA HDD/SSHD/SSD (with/without Intel Optane) in RAID/RST Premium mode : You need Intel SATA RAID/Optane drivers.
- Intel Optane or others Intel NVMe SSD : You need Intel SATA RAID/Optane drivers (used in NVMe mode).
- Samsung NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSD : You need Samsung NVMe drivers : [DRIVERS] Samsung NVMe.
- Samsung NVMe PCIe 4.0 SSD & all others brands NVMe PCIe 3.0/4.0 SSD : You don't need any drivers, Microsoft NVMe built-in drivers will be used.

MoKiChU wrote:
Hi,

Yes, your SATA controller is compatible with 18.3x drivers branch.



Yes, you can.

However, I would like to draw everyone's attention to the fact that in a standard and most common configuration, only the SATA AHCI drivers need to be installed. SATA RAID drivers should only be installed if you have configured a RAID (RST Premium) in your BIOS (using Intel Optane or not) or for Intel NVMe SSD.

To avoid any risk of conflict, install only what you need. Here are the drivers you must use depending on the case :

- SATA HDD/SSHD/SSD in AHCI mode : You need Intel SATA AHCI drivers.
- SATA HDD/SSHD/SSD (with/without Intel Optane) in RAID/RST Premium mode : You need Intel SATA RAID/Optane drivers.
- Intel Optane or others Intel NVMe SSD : You need Intel SATA RAID/Optane drivers (used in NVMe mode).
- Samsung NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSD : You need Samsung NVMe drivers : [DRIVERS] Samsung NVMe.
- Samsung NVMe PCIe 4.0 SSD & all others brands NVMe PCIe 3.0/4.0 SSD : You don't need any drivers, Microsoft NVMe built-in drivers will be used.


Thank you very much for your reply and thank you for the exhaustive explanation.

I have a following question regarding your instructions:

As I do not have any internal raid with NVMe or any kind of other raid inside my computer, can I simply remove both the SATA drivers up here that are shown as installed in my system?
In case, will Windows then substitute them with its internal standard SATA driver?
Will this be ok?

I have an Intel NVMe SSD as my C: drive with Windows on it, and I'm just getting now an extra NVMe from Seagate, model FireCuda 520 NVMe PCIe 4.0, or the FireCuda 510 NVMe PCIe 3.0, still deciding, to place it next to the Intel NVMe just for increasing my overall storage.
Should I install also the SATA driver as I have an Intel NVMe?
Buy what if I will go then for a PCIe 4.0 NVMe? As you mention, not one driver should be installed. What to do?


Thank you.

piratino wrote:
Thank you very much for your reply and thank you for the exhaustive explanation.

I have a following question regarding your instructions:

As I do not have any internal raid with NVMe or any kind of other raid inside my computer, can I simply remove both the SATA drivers up here that are shown as installed in my system?
In case, will Windows then substitute them with its internal standard SATA driver?
Will this be ok?


Hi,

Since you are not using your SATA controller at all, in order to save energy and relieve your system, you can disable your SATA Controller in your BIOS (Avanced > PCH Strorage Configuration > SATA Controller : Disabled then F10 to save & exit). I will tell you what drivers to install and what drivers to remove just below.

piratino wrote:
I have an Intel NVMe SSD as my C: drive with Windows on it, and I'm just getting now an extra NVMe from Seagate, model FireCuda 520 NVMe PCIe 4.0, or the FireCuda 510 NVMe PCIe 3.0, still deciding, to place it next to the Intel NVMe just for increasing my overall storage.
Should I install also the SATA driver as I have an Intel NVMe?
Buy what if I will go then for a PCIe 4.0 NVMe? As you mention, not one driver should be installed. What to do?


Thank you.


Once your SATA controller is disabled in your BIOS :

- Remove all versions of the SATA AHCI drivers (iaahcic.inf).
- Remove the old version from 17.9 drivers branch of the SATA RAID/Optane drivers (iastorac.inf).
- You still need the current version from 18.3x drivers branch of the SATA RAID/Optane drivers (iastorac.inf) used in NVMe mode for your Intel NVMe SSD.
- You don't need any others drivers for your Seagate FireCuda 510/520 NVMe SSD, Microsoft Standard NVMe built-in drivers will be used.

MoKiChU wrote:
Hi,

Since you are not using your SATA controller at all, in order to save energy and relieve your system, you can disable your SATA Controller in your BIOS (Avanced > PCH Strorage Configuration > SATA Controller : Disabled then F10 to save & exit). I will tell you what drivers to install and what drivers to remove just below.



Once your SATA controller is disabled in your BIOS :

- Remove all versions of the SATA AHCI drivers (iaahcic.inf).
- Remove the old version from 17.9 drivers branch of the SATA RAID/Optane drivers (iastorac.inf).
- You still need the current version from 18.3x drivers branch of the SATA RAID/Optane drivers (iastorac.inf) used in NVMe mode for your Intel NVMe SSD.
- You don't need any others drivers for your Seagate FireCuda 510/520 NVMe SSD, Microsoft Standard NVMe built-in drivers will be used.


Hello again and thank you.

This is very interesting. I have never though (and I bet a lot of other users as well) that if not using any RAID options with ssd/hdd drives inside the computer, the SATA controller should be/could be disabled in bios.
I have always though that it is still used by the hardware for correctly comunicate with all the drives, and (plus to that) it also has a RAID function, that can or cannot be used, as for user needs/personal preferences.

But let me understand this thing: if I disable the SATA controller, how does the ssd/hdd communicate with the other parts of the hardware? I supposte that the SATA controller, as I will disable it, it is only used for RAID functions and not any other vital functions for hardware communication between the drives and the motherboard/etc., right?
If so, motherboard producers do not explain this, as again I bet a lot of people just thinks that the SATA controlled should be kept on in the bios and install all its drivers.

Said so, I think it might be nice to add this in your first post, as for me for example, I'd like to install (and have things active in the bios) only if strictly necessary/if I use them.



Regarding the NVMe FireCuda 520 and 510, as they are respectfully PCI3 4.0 and 3.0, you say to use Microsoft's Windows built it drivers.
Just for personal knowledge, can you explain why for such evolute drives we shall use a standard driver?
Theoretically I would think that newer technologies might be better using the appropriate driver (like for example for the PCIe 3.0 Samsung drives that has dedicated drivers, as you also mention to use).


Ending this post, thank you for everything. I think that your answers might help a bunch of people, as drive's drivers are always that something I have personally experienced that people do not put too much effort in having them correctly installed.

piratino wrote:
Hello again and thank you.

This is very interesting. I have never though (and I bet a lot of other users as well) that if not using any RAID options with ssd/hdd drives inside the computer, the SATA controller should be/could be disabled in bios.
I have always though that it is still used by the hardware for correctly comunicate with all the drives, and (plus to that) it also has a RAID function, that can or cannot be used, as for user needs/personal preferences.

But let me understand this thing: if I disable the SATA controller, how does the ssd/hdd communicate with the other parts of the hardware? I supposte that the SATA controller, as I will disable it, it is only used for RAID functions and not any other vital functions for hardware communication between the drives and the motherboard/etc., right?
If so, motherboard producers do not explain this, as again I bet a lot of people just thinks that the SATA controlled should be kept on in the bios and install all its drivers.

Said so, I think it might be nice to add this in your first post, as for me for example, I'd like to install (and have things active in the bios) only if strictly necessary/if I use them.


If you are using one or more SATA HDD/SSHD/SSD in AHCI mode : You need to have your SATA controller active (AHCI mode).
If you are using one or more SATA HDD/SSHD/SSD in RAID/RST Premium mode (with/without Optane) : You need to have your SATA controller active (RAID mode).
If you use neither : You can disable your SATA controller.

So you can disable your SATA controller only if you only have NVMe SSDs (what is your case), and in this case, communication is done via PCIe lines (it is precisely the principle and the strength of NVMe compared to SATA).

piratino wrote:
Regarding the NVMe FireCuda 520 and 510, as they are respectfully PCI3 4.0 and 3.0, you say to use Microsoft's Windows built it drivers.
Just for personal knowledge, can you explain why for such evolute drives we shall use a standard driver?
Theoretically I would think that newer technologies might be better using the appropriate driver (like for example for the PCIe 3.0 Samsung drives that has dedicated drivers, as you also mention to use).

Ending this post, thank you for everything. I think that your answers might help a bunch of people, as drive's drivers are always that something I have personally experienced that people do not put too much effort in having them correctly installed.


Only Intel NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs (via SATA RAID drivers in NVMe mode) & Samsung NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs (via Samsung NVMe drivers) have drivers dedicated to its controller, most of all others NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs don't have drivers dedicated to its controller. To date, no NVMe PCIe 4.0 SSD has drivers dedicated to its controller (even Samsung 980 PRO NVMe PCIe 4.0 SSD don't have drivers dedicated to its controller), the drivers Microsoft Standard NVMe built-in drivers must be used.

MoKiChU wrote:
If you are using one or more SATA HDD/SSHD/SSD in AHCI mode : You need to have your SATA controller active (AHCI mode).
If you are using one or more SATA HDD/SSHD/SSD in RAID/RST Premium mode (with/without Optane) : You need to have your SATA controller active (RAID mode).
If you use neither : You can disable your SATA controller.

So you can disable your SATA controller only if you only have NVMe SSDs (what is your case), and in this case, communication is done via PCIe lines (it is precisely the principle and the strength of NVMe compared to SATA).



Only Intel NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs (via SATA RAID drivers in NVMe mode) & Samsung NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs (via Samsung NVMe drivers) have drivers dedicated to its controller, most of all others NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs don't have drivers dedicated to its controller. To date, no NVMe PCIe 4.0 SSD has drivers dedicated to its controller (even Samsung 980 PRO NVMe PCIe 4.0 SSD don't have drivers dedicated to its controller), the drivers Microsoft Standard NVMe built-in drivers must be used.


Thank you so much.

I have some doubts on which I'm using now. I have also some issues now in understanding what AHCI is and if I'm using it (or need it?!?).
I am not using any RAID, so if I have understood clearly, the SATA driver iaStorAC.inf is not needed in any case (mine and every other users) that does not use any RAID..correct?

I have an Intel NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSD, but you say to disable the SATA controller and uninstall the SATA driver...but at the end you say that "Only Intel NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSDs (via SATA RAID drivers in NVMe mode) .... have drivers dedicated to its controller".
So what does this exactly means? Do I have to uninstall the drivers for SATA controller and install some dedicated Intel NVMe PCIe 3.0 drivers, or that in this case I have to use the SATA iaStorAC.inf driver?

Sorry for the confirmations I'm asking, but this thing it is absolutely not explained by the manufacturers.

Thanks!